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Discussion Starter #1
Hi, new to this forum and wanted to find out about American Eskimo Breeders.

I live in California and it's been really hard for me to find good American Eskimo Breeders. I emailed a couple of them but none of them responded. I've checked shelters located within my area (daly city) but have not found one to my liking.
I prefer a puppy because I want to be able to build a bond with it along with the rest of my family members and watch it grow.
Can anyone recommend a reputable American Eskimo Breeder that is located in California? I'm located in Daly City but will travel, i.e plane or drive to check out the puppy myself.
Or if you guys could recommend a breeder out of state that would also be helpful. A little skeptical about ordering a puppy online and having it sent here without me meeting it in person makes me kind of nervous if you know what I mean.
 

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I would suggest you contact the National American Eskimo Dog Association or one of the state clubs. There is a club in Nevada, which probably would be the closest to you.
 

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First off, do not 'order' a puppy online. Read up on puppy mills, that's what you're getting if you do that.

Second, do some homework on the breed as far as health clearances go, check out www.caninehealthinfo.org - it has a list of 'suggested' clearances, as well as dogs that have all of them completed. There's only 27 for eskies so I'm guessing there's lots of breeders who don't do clearances, up to you on if you want to support one who doesn't or not. Since there's not many you can figure out what kennels to contact (each dog's name will start with the kennel name usually). They may not be near you but it doesn't hurt to ask for help! When you do contact a breeder, ask them what clearances they do, when they are planning their next litter, and if there are other breeders they can suggest you check out as well. Don't rush into getting a puppy next week, that often means you're getting what you can find. Most GOOD breeders will take a list and plan to breed later on, not breed then scramble for homes.

If you simply email and say 'do you have puppies right now' often breeders won't bother since it tends to be the person who wants a puppy NOW and has not done any homework. A friend of mine breeds goldens and she does send a form letter with information on the next litter she's planning, including pictures of the sire and dam and information on each, pictures of any related dogs to the breeding and a whole page on what she does as a breeder and what she expects from puppy owners. Often she doesn't get a response from the 'puppies now' emails, other than things like 'we found xxxx breeder and we got a puppy already' type responses - often they'll go on kijiji or the newspaper ad and pick up a pup after emailing breeders the same day.

You can also call local dog training centers or clubs and ask for suggestions, as well as your local kennel club, attend dog shows or events and ask for help too.
 

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I have to disagree Bordermom about looking online. Most of the top kennels have web pages with all their contact information and photos of their dogs and usually they have posted their breeding schedules so you'll know when the next puppies will be available. I agree that they will rarely have puppies available to those not on waiting lists. I researched for a full month online before chosing my breeder. I was able to research her dogs and their pedigrees as far back as I wanted to go. She is a small breeder whose breeding dogs all came from top kennels, and who does the appropriate testing and shows her dogs. Puppies were all raised inside her home, etc. She welcomes people to come see the puppies. She will not ship puppies. You must come and get them. Nearly a year and a half later we communicate regularly and I consider her a friend.

Also, if the OP is looking for a miniature or a toy, it might be a longer wait. Many times there are only 2-3 puppies to a litter, and rarely more than 4. That even makes it more difficult to get the sex you want. If the OP is having problems with getting answers to e-mails, call on the phone or send snail mail.

Warning to the OP - be ready for your house to look like it was hit by a snowstorm. Double-coated dogs are not meant for fastidious housekeepers!
 

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That's a good site. The trouble with it is that there is not a whole lot going on there. Four or five posts down and posts are a year old. Lots of good information on Eskies there though and a few breeders.
 

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I don't have a problem with looking online, but 'ordering' a dog off of a website is a different story. There are a lot of good breeders online, and a lot of 'puppies for you' type sites too - I wouldn't want the OP to think it's ok to just rush into things and assume a puppy off a website is totally fine.

I have not met my puppy's breeder in person, only online, but it was after talking to a lot of breeders and doing a lot of homework, and then getting onto her waiting list about six months ago. We're driving down next weekend to pick her up and will meet the breeder, possibly dad and some littermates in the process (breeder is meeting us halfway as she drops off the other puppies). So I'm not opposed to doing online research but it should be with some education as to what to look for and not just the first breeder who contacts them back.
 

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I agree with everything you say, but the OP stated she/he was looking for a good breeder and was skeptical about buying online so I figured she didn't need the cautioning.

If you find a really good breeder with excellent references, buying sight unseen is okay if the breeder knows what you are looking for and understands your experience and knowledge of the breed (or dogs in general).

In fact, with American Eskimos and other breeds that are aloof, tend to guard, and are extra vigilent, the breeder is probably the best person to chose the dog for an inexperienced buyer. AED's are always recommended for inexperienced owners, but I think that is a big mistake. I think they need more experienced owners as many of them are high strung. Although some are mellow, the breed is not known for loving everyone that crosses their path. :)
 

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I think they need more experienced owners as many of them are high strung. Although some are mellow, the breed is not known for loving everyone that crosses their path. :)
I've met eskies that are very indifferent to strangers, ones that are psychotically high strung/hyper and then there is my Chloe - the oddball. She is super sweet, super social, LOVES everyone & believes that everyone is here on earth to chase & run with her. She is unique from other eskies we've met & often hear it from owners we meet. She is a love. Most eskies are happy to hang with their peeps & briefly, at best, acknowledge new comers. They also can be super barky dogs. My Chloe barks far far far more than our other dog but far less than the avg eskie. She will bark if there is a boogie man outside then run to sit by me to protect me (while she is wagging her tail & waiting for the moment to lick the boogieman to death).
 

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Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
Thanks for your input guys.
I've contacted one breeder in Indiana according the akc site and another Yucca Village in Calfornia (http://www.littlesugarbabys.com)
They both said they have puppies available within 1-2weeks.

I've done many hours of research on the breed itself but looking for breeders is a whole other story and I can't tell if they are reliable or not. I've emailed shelters and other breeders but they have not responded. Maybe I should be more careful about the the content of the email =/.
Majority breeders are out of state and I wouldn't mind having it shipped here if its from a reputable breeder since plane tickets are pretty expensive especially to the other side of the U.S. =/

**How do you think I should start the email?
 

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If they have puppies available in 1-2 weeks, I would not think they are "respected" breeders even if they do advertise on the AKC site. They obviously do not have a waiting list. The best breeders nearly always have a waiting list and usually have people on the list even before the dogs are bred. Be patient and keep trying. Most good breeders only have 2-3 litters per year.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
^^
Only problem is its nearly impossible to identity "respectable" breeders. I've checked akc, google, other dog forums and none of them have been helpful. Even emailing shelters and vets didn't help because they never replied, and I usually don't call because I not very good with words unless I thought it through long enough. It's not I'm impatient but I've hit so many dead ends and people make it sound so easy looking for these things.

On the other handthe Akc eskie father site sent me a reply message of various breeders nationwide along with their numbers/location but no website or referrals/recommendations.

Btw are there specific times of the year breeders start breeding?
 

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Things to look for on reputable breeders' websites:

Pictures of titled dogs (usually stacked) with their full names & handlers, etc. A page dedicated to talking about where they started off, when, which were their foundation dogs, etc. etc. and what their goal is with the breed. Sometimes they will have pages of previous litter pics etc. They'll have some sort of instruction on how to contact them about a puppy, and will usually have a clause about waiting lists. Pedigrees of their breeding stock (usually Championed) can usually be found on the site too.

That website you found, I'll bet my money on it that it's some sort of BYB or puppy broker/farm. I'd definitely stay away from them.

ETA: Good breeders will 95% of the time have a page dedicated to health. They will mention health tests that they do on their dogs (PRA, luxating patellas, heart, hip dysplasia, etc. etc.) and their OFA numbers.
 

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**How do you think I should start the email?
When I emailed a handful of SS breeders (and got a response from everyone of them) I stated that I was looking into the breed, considering getting one at some point in the future. I stated my previous dog training and care experience. And I was extremely honast and upfront about my lifestyle and how the dog would fit in. I specifically asked if the breeders were comfortable placing a dog in a house with small children (my daughter was 2.5yo at the time) OR at what age did they want my dd to be before I got a puppy. In essence I didn't ask them if they had a puppy for me, instead I described my lifestye and expereince and expectations of a dog in detail and asked them if they would consider selling me a puppy at some time.... everyone I emailed contacted me back.

Once I got that first email response from them I called them up and asked them a slew of questions about their dogs,most of these questions are found in a thread on this forum. Or also found on most breed websites under "what a responsible breeder should look like" types of statements. Ask about the health certs, what the parents, the grandparens did, what do thier puppies go on to do, temperments, how often do the breed, what age is the bitch at first litter and how many litters will she have in her lifetime. What their training philosophies aare, how much socilization have they done, how they keep the puppies and potty training, do they crate train? How they manage their other dogs and etc etc.
 

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^^
Only problem is its nearly impossible to identity "respectable" breeders.
You can do some internet snooping. Do the breeders hold positions in the local or national breeders clubs? Are they past presidents of the national clubs? Are they well respected within their own community? Do they have 20 yrs or 2 yrs experience? Who was their mentor? It does take time, but if you pick up the phone and talk to enough people you can get a feel for a breeder.
 

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Things to look for on reputable breeders' websites:

Pictures of titled dogs (usually stacked) with their full names & handlers, etc. A page dedicated to talking about where they started off, when, which were their foundation dogs, etc. etc. and what their goal is with the breed. Sometimes they will have pages of previous litter pics etc. They'll have some sort of instruction on how to contact them about a puppy, and will usually have a clause about waiting lists. Pedigrees of their breeding stock (usually Championed) can usually be found on the site too.

That website you found, I'll bet my money on it that it's some sort of BYB or puppy broker/farm. I'd definitely stay away from them.

ETA: Good breeders will 95% of the time have a page dedicated to health. They will mention health tests that they do on their dogs (PRA, luxating patellas, heart, hip dysplasia, etc. etc.) and their OFA numbers.
This.


A Reputable Breeder will:
- Do health checks specific to the breed. This is not just a vet check of the puppies/parents for adults. They are specific tests looking for specific health problems because the health issue exists in the breed not that a specific dog has shown any symptoms. One example is testing all breeding stock of the Australian Shepherds (an example even though this isn't your breed) for the MDR1 mutation. The breeder will readily disclose the health testing they do and be proud of it - they have healthy stock and they aren't afraid to prove it.

Red Flag: Any breeder saying their vet has checked the dog as the only form of health testing, testing only for worms/parasites (and not other health issues), defensiveness about the level health testing they do when questioned about it

- Be active in the breed. Conformation showing (AKC show ring), agility, herding, mushing, etc all count. The activities of the breeder will vary with the purpose of the breed and the preference of the breeder. For Eskies - they are primarily companion dogs so activities such as agility, conformation, obedience is expected but you probably won't see any of the breeders competing in herding. Titled stock is expected with champions in the pedigree frequently - non-reputable breeders frequently advertise "champion bloodlines." The difference is that reputable breeders use champion dogs as their breeding stock and do not advertise they do (besides displaying the dog's championships, titles, etc) as a selling point. Non-reputable breeders will use "champion bloodlines" as a selling point

Red Flag: "Champion Bloodlines" as a selling point for the dogs, very few champions or only several generations back in the pedigree, no dog activities past or present (occasional breeders must stop competing personally due to health issues)

- Reputable breeders have a contract concerning pet dogs and show dogs. A reputable breeder does not sell an unaltered show quality dog to just anyone able to pay them. Unless you prove yourself a good, worthy home of a show quality unaltered animal the breeder is very unlikely to sell one to you. Although breeders may rehome retired champions they are almost always required to be altered. Reputable breeders will also match the pups to homes not just allow you to walk in and pick one without knowing them. The breeder knows the pups best and will work with you to determine which pup is the best match to your lifestyle and reason for acquiring the dog. The breeder also reserves first choice for themselves as they breed to better the breed not to sell pups. One of the very few exceptions is if the breeder thinks Puppy 1, Puppy 2 and Puppy 3 are all good matches for your home and then will let you pick the puppy you want. The breeder will then have a contract often outlining the dog will be returned to them if you are ever unable to keep it, you cannot breed the dog and that the dog must be altered within a specific time frame.

Red Flags: No contracts, no concern of the dog being altered, letting you pick just any pup you want, letting you pick based only on color

- Reputable breeders will encourage you to see the actual parents on site. You should be able to see at least one parent (and pics/information of the other parent) along with any siblings left. Although some breeders do not allow early visits to protect the pups from Parvo and other diseases however you should be able to get pictures (clear pictures with markings obviously visible) if you are taking a pup from the litter even if you don't know which is yours yet. Breeders may not make the decision for several weeks until they are able to clearly see the pups personalities and tendencies.

Red Flags: Meeting on neutral territory, not having any parent to see/interact with, not sending clear pictures of the pups

Being listed on the AKC, breed websites, breed forums, etc does not guarantee reputability. In fact the AKC will register any litter of pups born to purebred parents regardless of the condition of the parents or pups.

Do not e-mail asking "Do you have any puppies?" or "When will you have puppies available?"
E-mail telling about yourself, what you are looking for in a dog, why you are looking for a dog and what you intend to with the dog. Include as many specifics as you can.
 

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Here is a place to start. These are this year's entries at Westminster. Look at the dog's names to find the kennel name. Then google them. You can do a search for other dog shows and find the entries and final standings and the owners' names.

http://www.westminsterkennelclub.org/2011/entries/breed/amesk.html

I pm'd you with some examples of reputable breeders' sites. My dog's breeder is the last one, but I left off the end of the address by mistake so add "americaneskimos" to the end of it. I liked her site because she posts so many photos of her puppies and you can watch them grow week by week. Nearly a year and a half later and we still communicate weekly at least. I researched the sire and dam's pedigrees and I also liked the "look" of her dogs. My dog's dam had her 4th and last litter this year and is now retired - she had four little girls. It takes a lot of research and dedication to find a good dog, but you will be glad you made the effort. Eskies are extremely smart and can be a handful, so be sure to come here for help when you need it. Since you are a first time owner, it may be better if you go to an Eskie rescue and get an older dog - one who is over puppyhood and has mellowed out a bit.

You haven't mentioned your housing situation. Eskies are not a good choice for apartment living - they like to bark at every little thing. It can be trained out somewhat but in the meantime might get you evicted.

Healthwise - American Eskimos should be tested for PRA and hip/elbow dysplasia. They are a healthy, long lived breed, and these are the only two kinds of tests usually done on them.
 

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Discussion Starter #18 (Edited)
Thank you everyone for your help.
This has been the most helpful forum I've encountered so far. You guys are great!
I'll keep you guys updated onto what I've encountered in regards to breeders/shelters.

**Edit** Oh as for the housing I live in a house. 4 bd 3upstairs/1 downstairs, 2.5 bathrooms 1.5 upstairs/1 downstairs, a living room, dining room, kitchen, 1 car garage but we just leave it as empty space and park the cars outside and a backyard about the size of 1-1.5 times a basketball court.
 
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