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Discussion Starter #1
Hello all. I posted this is another thread but it was out of context. Thought I would post here to see what you all had to say




I am really trying to get a jump start on Lucy,s play biting and tugging before we can start training in 4 weeks . Here is what I am doing and please tell me if this right.

I sit with her to play and if she pounces me and or bites me I say leave it. Note: we have practiced the leave it command by offering her a treat in one hand and throwing her a small treat when she leaves the one in my hand offered to her alone. So after a bit of that training I have tried to transfer it to the biting. So if she is biting and I say leave it and she backs off I give her a small treat and praise. I try to have sessions where we play and work on this for bits of time at a time. I am also trying to use this for her biting and tugging my pants and socks when we play in the yard.

Am I doing it right at this stage of the game? What I fear is that I am reinforcing her to nip then stop to get a treat rather than not to nip at all. Kind of the same thing with pawing up on my chair while I am sitting at the kitchen table.

I really have no idea what I am doing! Lol

Thank you for any advice you can give.
 

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There's a sticky in this forum or the first time owner forum called "The Bite Stops Here". Read that.
 

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If it works, keep trying it.

However, as Amaryllis wrote, check out the Sticky: The Bite Stops Here. This will teach you about Bite Inhibition, which is a little different than stopping the nipping. With Bite Inhibition training, you are teaching the puppy to control how hard she bites, both in play and in other circumstances. So, if your dog is hurt or scared, she will inhibit her bite rather than just react and chomp to bleeding.
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
I have read the thread. I have tried the ouch or yelp for quite a few times and it appears that just works her up more. She revs up to bark and comes in for another bite. If I turn my back she will bite my clothes on my back or anything she can get. The only recourse I have is to get up and leave her very singe time she bites me too hard. Should I do that rather than teaching the leave it with treats when biting?

It is very possible I am not doing the bite stops here technique correctly. It is very possible i am not teaching the leave it command correctly either.

We will be going to training in about 5 more weeks but I wanted to start working on this now. I am such a newbie and on such a huge
Learning curve. But I very much want to train her in an effective but loving and respectful way. I hope I'm not making things worse by trying these things on my own before I have the advice of a trainer.
 

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I have read the thread. I have tried the ouch or yelp for quite a few times and it appears that just works her up more. She revs up to bark and comes in for another bite. If I turn my back she will bite my clothes on my back or anything she can get. The only recourse I have is to get up and leave her very singe time she bites me too hard. Should I do that rather than teaching the leave it with treats when biting?
Different dogs are different - maybe your ouch or yelp sounds more like a play bark, or in the context (you two are playing) she just thinks you're doing some vocal play (like how some dogs growl during play, etc)

I would try the get up and leave. What the 'leave it' cue might be doing is that you're just asking her to back away (which she does - nice job, btw), but she doesn't understand it's supposed to stop her nipping. She's not grasping that part from what it sounds like.

Getting up and leaving, totally ending the whole interaction, play, training, treats, all of it is gone, that might help her understand. All food and fun stops if puppy's teeth touch mom's skin.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Different dogs are different - maybe your ouch or yelp sounds more like a play bark, or in the context (you two are playing) she just thinks you're doing some vocal play (like how some dogs growl during play, etc)

I would try the get up and leave. What the 'leave it' cue might be doing is that you're just asking her to back away (which she does - nice job, btw), but she doesn't understand it's supposed to stop her nipping. She's not grasping that part from what it sounds like.

Getting up and leaving, totally ending the whole interaction, play, training, treats, all of it is gone, that might help her understand. All food and fun stops if puppy's teeth touch mom's skin.

Thanks I will do that. She is learning to back off when I say leave it. (She's pretty smart as far as I can tell.) And I am teaching it with a lot of different things. My hands. My clothes. Socks. Shoestrings. The cats. Lol. She does a good job when she is very focused during the training session. However She is rather obsessed with the treats and she will often approach the item then back off quickly, and sit down before I even say leave it. Then look at me waiting for the treat. It's hysterical but I'm no sure I am teaching her the right things. Lol
 

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However She is rather obsessed with the treats and she will often approach the item then back off quickly, and sit down before I even say leave it. Then look at me waiting for the treat. It's hysterical but I'm no sure I am teaching her the right things. Lol
Nice, she's offering the 'leave it' and is waiting for the reward. Confident :) As you two get to know each other and she matures some, you might want to consider shaping. She seems like she's already feeling out offering behaviors to see if she can't win a reward. You might want to consider rewarding that thought process now and then.

Good idea with teaching the leave it with so many different things. Generalization is going to happen faster and all of that practice is just building up how strongly it's conditioned and building up a reward history.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Nice, she's offering the 'leave it' and is waiting for the reward. Confident :) As you two get to know each other and she matures some, you might want to consider shaping. She seems like she's already feeling out offering behaviors to see if she can't win a reward. You might want to consider rewarding that thought process now and then.

Good idea with teaching the leave it with so many different things. Generalization is going to happen faster and all of that practice is just building up how strongly it's conditioned and building up a reward history.
What is shaping? And u mean to give her a treat when she does her faux leave it maneuver? Lol

She's really smart I tell you. The few little things I am fumbling to teach her she learns really fast.

Ps. Thanks for all the help here on these forums. I am learning so much. ( I educated the vet today that angel eyes had typos in in it. Oopsie )
 

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What is shaping? And u mean to give her a treat when she does her faux leave it maneuver? Lol
I would occasionally because she's offering you a behavior chain. She's "playing out" the leave it behavior, offering it to you on her own. That's a key part of shaping, a dog offering an action on her own like that as she tries to discover the solution to the puzzle, so to speak.

Shaping is where you take a behavior and break it down into small steps or pieces (smaller the better, the dog can always "skip steps" if she catches on), then reward the dog as she get each step right or otherwise moves towards your goal. For example, when I did it for Wally sitting on his scale, I took a paw on the scale, then two paws, etc, until he did the whole behavior in one action. It's not hard to do, just a different way of thinking and working.

Then there's free shaping where you just take whatever the dog initiates on her own (as long as it's safe/acceptable). So if she sits, you reward that. Then maybe she'll lift a paw, lie down, nose target something. It's more an exercise to encourage the dog to take initiative in trying to figure something out and offer something in the possibility that it's something you'd reward. Usually, you'll get mostly behaviors she's already learned/been rewarded for, at least initially.

Here's some links on it if you're interested down the line.

101 things to do with a box
Shaping Dog Behavior - Keep it Fun
Youtube video of a dog being shaped to turn on a light switch
 
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