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Discussion Starter #1
I love my dogs very much and love to spend time with them, but sometimes me and my boyfriend just want to be alone. Banjo jumps on us and needs constant attention for the most part. Sometimes she'll go lie down but if we start showing affection for each other, she's like a little kid when their parents start kissing, and jumps in between us and licks and scratches and all. Aurora gets very uncomfortable, and has snapped at my boyfriend a couple of times when he's shown affection for me (this hasn't happen since the first week we had her). She also tends to eliminate on the floor, if we kick her out of the room, almost immediately. Other than that, she doesn't go on the floor when we're home (we crate her when we leave). If we kick both of them out of the room (putting Aurora in her crate and Banjo loose, since she hates her crate and does fine loose) they bark and scratch at the door and howl. I really really love them and love having dogs, but this is the only problem I'm having with the whole experience. The housetraining has been a struggle, but tolerable. Banjo's over-excitement, Aurora running away, there have been difficulties, but this is the only thing I can say, that I can't stand about having dogs. It kind of upsets me that it bothers me so much.
How can we get them comfortable with us being alone at home?
BTW, kicking not physically, just figuratively...lol.
 

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I'm lucky I have fairly quiet breeds. My dogs don't care if I ignore them. We did have an issue with Ridik scratching and whining, but a few quickly opened doors in his face later, all was well. I'm sure there's a way to go about it, just thought I'd give your thread a bump and see if anyone else chimes in.
 

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Thats when crates and marrow bones come in handy:) Or toys you can feed them out of (just got a new one they LOVE called the bob a lot, keeps them busy for 20-30 minutes). When Julie and I want some time just the 2 of us, the dogs get put somewhere with some marrow bones, the food toys or bully sticks and it usually keeps them quiet.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Alright. I'll try that. The thing with Banjo is that she is still very wary of crates, so we let her have the run of the house, instead of freaking her out more. Should I feel bad about having one dog in the crate and the other one allowed to run free? During the day, I usually seperate them so the one in the crate can't see the one loose, but I put the loose one in the bedroom, which is the only room in the house with a place to sit/lay down, and is the place we go to cool off when we need space from the dogs. Maybe I could gate her in the kitchen or something. I just hope they are interested in the bones enough. These two thrive on human attention and usually will leave their bone/toy etc for attention. Marrow bones are the ones with stuff inside them that keep them going for awhile, right?
 

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Marrow bones are sometimes sold as soup bones. The big grocery store here sells 4 of them for like $2. Good deal. They have marrow inside the bone, and they usually have a small amount of meat left on them. You give them raw (don't cook them, a cooked bone could damage their teeth). You can also go to a butcher and just ask if they cheap bones you can buy for your dogs.

Having one dog crated and one not is no big deal. Dogs just deal with what is. If you don't make a big deal out of it they won't either.
 

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Can you leave the door open but put a pet gate in front of it so that they can still see you? Or pen them in the room with you? Gradually you can work your way up to a closed door. Our nosy girl didn't like being shut out either, so we started with the baby gate. Now she doesn't care at all if we leave her out in the hall, esp. if we give her a kong to slurp.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
It doesn't seem to matter whether they can see us or not. They're fine with us being alone with the door shut, but they seem to be able to tell when we start being affectionate with each other, and that's when they start barking and growling.
 

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=BanJojo;480047]The thing with Banjo is that she is still very wary of crates, so we let her have the run of the house, instead of freaking her out more.
All the more reason to crate her, so that she becomes used to it. My (3) adult dogs have earned freedom of the house long ago, but their crates are still up, and I will still ask them to "kennel up" when I want them out of the way for whatever reason. The puppy is still crated with the gate locked, to keep her safe, and my things safe (she likes to chew).


I just hope they are interested in the bones enough. These two thrive on human attention and usually will leave their bone/toy etc for attention.

Your dogs are demanding your attention, and you give it, so, you're teaching them to continue to do it, because it works. I ignore a demanding dog because I find that behavior very annoying. Implement NILIF into daily life, and teach your dogs to go to their mats for "quiet time," with a chewie or Kong. I require daily 30-min. down/stays from my (already trained) dogs, just to keep the status quo. Start with 5 minutes, and work your way up. I have 4 dogs and two cats, and live alone. If I let them, they'd demand my attention non-stop! When I have company, they're allowed to say their hello's, but that's it. I'll either send them to their crates (open), or let them remain in the same room, but they're not to bother us, unless invited.
 

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This is not a dog problem, this is a people problem. Many years ago more than I care to mention I had to go to work. Trust me I was wary of a job and some jobs were worse than others(until I turned dog professional)but it was not a perfect world. Your dogs must also learn it is not a perfect world. Problems like this are like a snowball rolling downhill the further it rolls the bigger it gets. Like everything in life these are your personal choices to make, to train or not to train.
Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I am planning on using the crate as soon as she is comfortable around it. If you force her too fast, it can be damaging and then they won't ever go in it again. As soon as she gets comfortable, we will use it again, but last time we moved too fast and she woudn't even go near it, so we're taking it easy this time.
As for demanding our attention, we don't give them attention unless they sit, or whatever we ask them to do before giving them attention, and if they are barking and scratching at the door, we won't come out until they calm down. We stand at the door telling Banjo to sit, and as soon as she's quiet and not against the door, we figure she's sitting (we're usually right) and come out, if she continues to jump, we ignore her until she calms down, or we tell her to sit and she will, and then we pet her. Banjo seems to have a lot of emotional problems, and sometimes she is trying so hard to sit, but her but keeps wiggling and she has trouble...lol. It's really cute. I worry, though, about what she must have gone through before we got her, and we're taking it slow, not expecting too much out of her too fast, because when we did at first, she freaked out.
 

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=BanJojo;481489]I am planning on using the crate as soon as she is comfortable around it. If you force her too fast, it can be damaging and then they won't ever go in it again. As soon as she gets comfortable, we will use it again, but last time we moved too fast and she woudn't even go near it, so we're taking it easy this time.
If you wait until she's "ready," it's never going to happen. Dogs, just like children, thrive on structure and routine. Establish a daily routine with crate times included, gradually extending the length of time she's actually in the crate. If you don't make it a big deal, the dog won't. If you don't make the house rules, your dog(s) will.

As for demanding our attention, we don't give them attention unless they sit, or whatever we ask them to do before giving them attention, and if they are barking and scratching at the door, we won't come out until they calm down. We stand at the door telling Banjo to sit, and as soon as she's quiet and not against the door, we figure she's sitting (we're usually right) and come out, if she continues to jump, we ignore her until she calms down, or we tell her to sit and she will, and then we pet her.
Well, then, I guess you don't have a problem after all.


Banjo seems to have a lot of emotional problems, and sometimes she is trying so hard to sit, but her but keeps wiggling and she has trouble...lol. It's really cute. I worry, though, about what she must have gone through before we got her, and we're taking it slow, not expecting too much out of her too fast, because when we did at first, she freaked out.

I've worked with rescues for years. The kindest thing you can do is to forget about what may have happened to the dog before the dog came to you, otherwise, you can actually reinforce the "emotional" and/or behavioral problems. Structure and routine makes them feel secure; letting them do as they will helps no one. Establish a daily routine, provide structure with times for running off the zoomies, meals, walks, play, naps, training, quiet time, grooming, and bedtime.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
We tried not waiting till she was ready and she got so scared that she refused to go near the crate, and I always heard you never physically force a dog into a crate. As for daily structure, we are both students and or daily schedule is different each day. some days we are home all day, and some days we are gone for anywhere from 4 to 13 hours during the day.
 
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