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Discussion Starter #1
My bf is technically allergic to dogs and cats. He was highly allergic to our cat but has never had any problems with Sydney. We figured he had outgrown that allergy, but discovered recently that he has a slight allergic reaction to every longhaired dog he has met. He hasn't noticed any reaction to the shorthaired ones.

Breeds he wasn't allergic to:
- Sydney (shorthaired mix)
- Italian greyhound
- JRT
- terrier mix
- APBT mix

Breeds he was slightly allergic to:
- shih-tzu
- maltese
- poodle
- American eskimo dog
- border collie mix
- springer spaniel

What struck me is that many of the dogs that give him issues are considered "hypo-allergenic" because they don't shed. Could this be because long fur traps more dander? Or could it be a different allergen that is getting trapped in their long fur?

Just curious if anyone has experienced this type of allergy or has any knowledge as to why it's just the longhaired dogs, since this seems to go against conventional wisdom regarding dog allergies.
 

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I read somewhere that a true allergy to dogs is veryvery rare, and most of the reactions people have are to the pollen, dust, etc. trapped in the dog's fur. So for him that's probably true. Little mop dogs pick up a lot of floor dust and grass pollen :p.
 

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I am going to take a stab at this and say it is environmental pollens being carried in the longer fur as it may be embedded deeply within it? I have never heard of anyone allergic to different lengths of actual hair ... but the skin of the dog and it's dander. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Huh, that makes a lot of sense. Throws the whole hypoallergenic dog thing out the window for us, though. I was seriously considering a Havanese for our next dog think it would be a good compromise, but I might just get my rat terrier after all! ;) He wanted a fluffy dog but I'd rather not have to be constantly after the dog's fur to keep the environmental allergies out. And I'm sure he would too.
 

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Those dogs you named, only the Maltese is hypoallergenic. And no true breed of dog is as all dogs shed, but there are ones that shed less than others. Some dogs don't shed at all unless combed, Luke's breed is considered hypoallergenic because he's a single coated dog. Single coated breeds would be better to get since your bf is allergic. I'm allergic to dogs, cats, dust, smoke, you name it...I've probably sneezed, wheezed, etc from it. Don't get a fluffy dog as they'll be more likely to shed.

So yeah, go with a single coated dogs, there are whole lists of them on the internet. Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Those dogs you named, only the Maltese is hypoallergenic. And no true breed of dog is as all dogs shed, but there are ones that shed less than others. Some dogs don't shed at all unless combed, Luke's breed is considered hypoallergenic because he's a single coated dog. Single coated breeds would be better to get since your bf is allergic. I'm allergic to dogs, cats, dust, smoke, you name it...I've probably sneezed, wheezed, etc from it. Don't get a fluffy dog as they'll be more likely to shed.

So yeah, go with a single coated dogs, there are whole lists of them on the internet. Good luck.
Poodles aren't considered hypollergenic?
 

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Oh sorry, must've skipped that breed. Yes, they are considered hypoallergenic. But I would do your research on it as I've come across insane posts like, "I have a hypoallergenic Samoyed." Yeah...right, that dog is a shedder.

Whoa, here's a good site I found: http://www.dog-obedience-training-review.com/hypoallergenic-dogs.html
And another that mentions some breeds (large and small, common and rare): http://www.dogguide.net/dog-breeds-for-allergies.php
Again there are many sites to go to, when researching the breeds you and your bf want. :)
 

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Both of my Schnauzer/Poodles did /do not shed. They were they only dogs my Mother could be around as she was highly allergic and also had severe copd. They have/had a single coat also. But white dogs show all the carpet fuzz colors! Lol! I always bathed them weekly. :) It helped to keep the dust mites down.
 

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Fyi, some breeds with a single coat DO shed. Papillons are one such example of a single long coat that sheds.
 

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It may be environmental things like pollen getting caught in the fur. My husband's best friend thought he was allergic to dogs for years. My double coated, long haired GSDxGR he didn't react to. (He's allergic to everything and ends up in the hospital all the time. Once from rhubarb.) He had a full allergy panel done and it turned out dogs were about the only thing he wasn't allergic to. I think the reason he didn't react to Muggsy is because I'm a freak about brushing my dogs every day. Most people don't do that, so pollen, etc. gets caught in their coats.
 

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I always bathed them weekly. :) It helped to keep the dust mites down.
I do the same thing with mine too, although I was kinda scared at first..I was told that we're not supposed to bath them weekly cuz it may cause them dryness and some other reasons.

I've got asthma (mild) so I need to vaaccum/dust my house at least every other day, or I will start wheezing. We don't really let them sleep with us...well, once in awhile is ok :D
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Fyi, some breeds with a single coat DO shed. Papillons are one such example of a single long coat that sheds.
Well, in this particular case, shedding does not appear to be the problem. He's doesn't get allergy symptoms around Sydney and other short-haired (shedding) dogs.
 
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