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So the title is pretty explanatory. My family wanted a puppy so after a lot of research we identified the breed etc. I (the potentially allergic person) even had a skin allergy test done. The tests came back negative, but the allergist cautioned me and said basically they only test for major proteins and it was possible I was reacting in the real world to proteins that they dont test form.


I met with multiple breeds. In the process of meeting the dogs at different breeders I did feel some allergic symptoms, but I chalked that up to other environmental allergens like pollen etc. We picked the dog based on temperament, non shedding criteria.

Knowing this we decided to go ahead with getting puppy. Of course as soon as we got it home, I started to have symptoms (itchy eyes, nose, mouth, the whole nine yards). My kids of course are already in love and so excited. So far there are hepa filters going, the dog isnt allowed in the bedroom or on furniture. We dont have carpet.

So now I'm real tough spot. Do I tough it out and hope they go away, while my kids get attached? As a side note, antihistamines and I dont do well together. It feels like I'm either on speed or I'm dead asleep. There is no non itchy lucid medium.
 

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When I married, my wife was violently allergic to dogs - as in can't breath and rush to the ER. She went through a long series of allergy shots and 17 years after we were married we got a gigantic, double-coated black lab - possibly the worst possible dog for someone who is/was allergic. Since then, we've had as many as five dogs in the house at-a-time and they all sleep in our bedroom. She is not exactly symptom-free, but the symptoms are not so serious that she has ever suggested returning to a dog-free household.

FWIW, she seems to tolerate the dogs who are permanent residents (even the 116# lab) better than visiting dogs, so I'm thinking she builds up a certain amount of immunity.

Since the dog is already in your house, I guess you can't wait 17 years, but check on the shots. There is some question regarding the effectiveness of the sub-lingual drops that some clinics offer as an alternative.
 

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My husband has always been quite allergic to just about everything. When we got our pup he went through many of the same symptoms you are describing. But after a couple months things calmed down and now he tolerates her very well. We have a bichon so they do not shed much. Good luck.
 

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Something to try. I'm allergic to dogs, cats, pollen (all the trees and grasses), etc.. Basically just about everything. I have two dogs and a cat. Fortunately I am able to take Claritan and the like when needed. The thing I found helped the most however, by accident really, is a green smoothie everyday. I was drinking one for general health every day a few years ago, and having (forcing?) my husband to drink some. Basically lettuce, spinach, kale, cucumber and an apple with a glass of water. Sometimes I add flaxseed.
One day a couple of months after we started this I noticed my boss was suffering terribly from spring allergies. It dawned on me that usually I'd be right there with her blowing my nose, sneezing, headaches, the whole shebang. I was blown away. I hadn't even taken anything. Green smoothies were the only thing I'd added.
Something to try!
Good luck with the puppy.
 

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Fortunately, I'm not allergic. But from what I understand, the allergy is triggered by the hair and dander mixed with the dog saliva. The method to mitigate some of the problem is at the source. Breed is first step, next step is a solid and consistent grooming routine for the dog. Regular brushing, bathing, teeth brushing, parasite treatments. Then the next is to keep the home a free from hair and dander. Frequent vacuum, dusting, mopping, washing.

Good luck, I wish you the best. BTW, what is the breed you brought home?
 

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Fortunately, I'm not allergic. But from what I understand, the allergy is triggered by the hair and dander mixed with the dog saliva. The method to mitigate some of the problem is at the source. Breed is first step, next step is a solid and consistent grooming routine for the dog. Regular brushing, bathing, teeth brushing, parasite treatments. Then the next is to keep the home a free from hair and dander. Frequent vacuum, dusting, mopping, washing.

Good luck, I wish you the best. BTW, what is the breed you brought home?
Thanks. We got an Australian labradoodle/cobberdog. I realize there is a lot of scuttle around poodle crosses, but we chose it for temperament and then non shedding qualities.
 

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Scuttle is no concern. It is your dog selected based on your needs, desires or wants.

Non-shedding is a good step. I'm not sure about the shed characteristics of that mix. Even so, the dog will lose hair. No dog is 100% non-shedding. Frequent brushing and combing is likely to become part of the daily/weekly routine. Get a deshedding rake, slicker brush and a greyhound comb.

My mini-schnauzer gets a grooming 2-3X each week. The routine begins with the deshedding rake, then the slicker brush, then the comb to work his legs and face. I always get some hair from his undercoat. I have to do the grooming often because the little twerp manages to collect all sorts of sidewalk debris in his coat. It also gives me time to examine his coat and body closely, plus when I'm done.......he is so happy and excited for a good play, then I pay about 20 minutes of belly-rub tax.
 

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I too went to an allergist and got tested. Turns out I am allergic to pretty much all trees & grass pollens in my area, along with cats and dogs. I have been getting shots every week for the past 3 months and adopted a dog (shedding) during that time. I can tell you my allergies have lessoned considerably just in that short amount of time. Even if you are only slightly allergic to dogs and say VERY allergic to the common pollens in your area, your immune system response could be constantly battling these allergens, causing a worse reaction to your dog. If it's something you can afford to do, I suggest getting a full panel allergy test and going for the shots.
 

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I too went to an allergist and got tested. Turns out I am allergic to pretty much all trees & grass pollens in my area, along with cats and dogs. I have been getting shots every week for the past 3 months and adopted a dog (shedding) during that time. I can tell you my allergies have lessoned considerably just in that short amount of time. Even if you are only slightly allergic to dogs and say VERY allergic to the common pollens in your area, your immune system response could be constantly battling these allergens, causing a worse reaction to your dog. If it's something you can afford to do, I suggest getting a full panel allergy test and going for the shots.
Thanks. I think what I am struggling to figure out is I technically tested negative for the dog allergens, so I'm not sure if that means the shots will have a meaningful affect. I guess the only way is to try really.
 

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Ok....paint me with the confused brush.

Your opening question states you are allergic to dogs. Now, you state your test for dog allergens is negative.

You may be chasing the wrong allergy problem by focusing on the dog. Anyhow, a low shedding dog, frequent grooming and bathing will help to control the dog hair and dander.
 

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Ok....paint me with the confused brush.

Your opening question states you are allergic to dogs. Now, you state your test for dog allergens is negative.

You may be chasing the wrong allergy problem by focusing on the dog. Anyhow, a low shedding dog, frequent grooming and bathing will help to control the dog hair and dander.
It is a confusing story. My family wanted a dog, but I had noticed I was slightly allergic around some other family members dogs. So I got an allergy test. The test came back negative. I thought we were in the clear. We also got a low shed dog. But as soon as we picked up the dog I have been having awful symptoms. Running nose, itchy eyes, itchy skin etc. It has been below freezing a bit so there are no active pollens or other environmental allergens, so the only thing is I am allergic to something dog related.
 

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As Knute suggested, the allergen may be dander and saliva, not fur. Also, Labs (even Lab mixes) may be the most problematic. So, in addition to your treatments, you may want to try avoiding being licked or nuzzled by the dog ... or at least reduce exposure to his nose and tongue. And, try washing him once a week [or twice a month] in different types of dog-friendly soaps, and making a note of your reactions ... and how long it takes before you have a strong reaction? By soaps, I mean Oatmeal soap, medicated soap, flea shampoo etc.... be sure that these are all dog soaps & shampoos from the pet store or the Vet .... You might ask the Vet and the allergist for their opinions with this approach.

Also, you might ask about giving the dog Omega-3 fish oil to increase the oil In his coat ... maybe a shinier coat has less free dander? And, be sure to have someone brush the dog once or twice a day ... outside.
 

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No matter what type of dog you might have, taking good care of him will help relieve some of your allergic reactions. Through making positive your dog is bathed and groomed faithfully, you may free him of large amounts of dander. In addition, you can make modifications to your house, like covering your mattress with a vinyl cover and transforming all bedding at least once every week. Carpeting harbors large amounts of dust, dander, along with other contaminants, regardless of how often you vacuum, hardwood and vinyl, or linoleum flooring are much much better selections for allergic reaction victims.
 

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Hello, fellow allergic dog owner here. Your allergies will get better over time once you get acclimated to the dog (they won’t disappear but i have seen that my symptoms have diminished over time). Just make sure to be cautious. Don’t rub your eyes after touching the dog, try not to let the dog lick you (personally i’m allergic to dog saliva i don’t know if you are too) and also someone earlier mentioned bathing him more often and i would recommend wearing gloves to bath him. Also i would recommend using a de shedding shampoo or conditioner as dogs tend to shed more directly after a bath. With all the positive things a dog brings a few allergy symptoms are totally worth it.
 

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Hello, fellow allergic dog owner here. Your allergies will get better over time once you get acclimated to the dog (they won’t disappear but i have seen that my symptoms have diminished over time). Just make sure to be cautious. Don’t rub your eyes after touching the dog, try not to let the dog lick you (personally i’m allergic to dog saliva i don’t know if you are too) and also someone earlier mentioned bathing him more often and i would recommend wearing gloves to bath him. Also i would recommend using a de shedding shampoo or conditioner as dogs tend to shed more directly after a bath. With all the positive things a dog brings a few allergy symptoms are totally worth it.
Thanks! How long did it take for you to notice a reduction in your symptoms?
 

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Hello, fellow allergic dog owner here. Your allergies will get better over time once you get acclimated to the dog (they won’t disappear but i have seen that my symptoms have diminished over time).
I don't want to be a downer, but I also don't want to foster false optimism that could be bad for your dog in the long run. I have had exactly the opposite experience - I had mild allergies as a kid, and as I've gotten older they've gotten worse and worse, to the point that they actually cause me dangerous breathing trouble. With medication I can tolerate non-shedding dogs like poodles so long as they're frequently groomed (most doodles are more allergenic than purebred poodles despite breeders' claims). Anything more provokes a serious reaction. For comparison, when I was a teen I could tolerate any dog or cat without medication, experiencing just mild sneezing and itching.

If you're keeping the dog, I'd create a dog-free space in the house where he is not permitted, and get air purifier units, and invest in a very good vacuum. I'd also have the dog frequently groomed by a professional OUTSIDE your home so grooming doesn't just, like, transfer the dander from the dog to the kids and the floor. I'd also see a professional about med options - OTC antihistamines screw me up, too, but my doc has me on a regime that's pretty effective. Good luck!
 
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