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Has this happened to anyone else ? I have a 10 month old red merel australian shepherd that i had neutered at 5 months. I got him at 3 months and he was a happy, loveable puppy. It seems the neuter brought out aggressive/anxious tendencies in him. Hes loveable to me and my boyfriend, but sometimes he does a quick nip at people he doesn't see daily. For instance, he's spent time with my dad every few weeks since I got him, but when my dad walks in the door he still acts unsure of nervous (barking, growling, even nipping). Also, when I bring him to the dog park, he mostly plays nice but will nip at other dogs from time to time in an aggressive manner. It's almost like a response to anxiety or being unsure. He has also expressed submissive tendencies (peeing when hes in trouble, putting ears down, avoiding eye contact). All of these behaviors started post-neuter. Hes such a sweet boy, I want him to have the happy life he deserves. I'm just not sure what more I can do for him. His vet put him on anti anxiety meds that we tried for months with no avail. Hes well exsersized and is shown lots of love. Any ideas ?
 

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Australian Shepherds are known for their tendency to be wary of strangers. In well bred dogs, it typically manifests as aloofness and a general disinterest in anyone who is not family. In not so well bred dogs, it manifests as true anxiety, which can lead to displays of aggression. Its in their genetics, and you can't really fix it. Anxiety medication can help. Have you got a second opinion from another vet you can maybe suggest a different type of medication?

Aussies are herders, and nipping at other dogs and trying to 'herd' them around is a common behavior. Dog parks are often not the best place for herding breeds because of this.

Herding breeds are often very sensitive and take it personally when they are corrected or receive what they perceive as harsh punishment. I'm not saying that you beat your dog or anything, but a raised voice, loud clapping, a stern 'no', or even a disappointed facial expression can be 'harsh punishment' in their eyes. Instead of punishing him after the fact, set him up for success by managing his environment so he can't get into trouble. That might be picking up shoes and other inappropriate items that your dog might want to make his chew toy, locking up trash, or simply crating so he can't make bad decisions and create bad habits. Then, you never have any need to punish him or make him afraid of you.
 
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