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First post... My dog is a little over a year old and she is perfectly fine with me, wife and select family members. But when we take here out she is somewhat shy with others. If someone places their hand down, she will sniff and then try to bite (more than nip) then follow it by growling and barking. We tend to grab her in time but I believe she would continue to try an bite the individual if given the chance. Any ideas on how to work on this. We do take her out and about quite often.
 

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Do not let people pet her. Pay attention and get between her and other people. ADVOCATE for your dog. Let her know you have her back. If people want to pet your dog say "No. She would prefer you did not." I will say it again, pay attention... Do not let random people approach or touch your dog. She has a nerve issue so protect her.

Most pet owners think their dog must be friends with every human the dog meets. They walk with their dog and stop and look at their phone and the dog is just hanging out at the end of the leash.. and has not advocate. I see it all the time. NO you may NOT pet my dog and then get between your dog and the person.

If random people want to pet a dog they can get their own dog to pet.
 

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Agree with 3GSD,

Although there can be a different tact with people you know. If they ask to pet the dog, then you need to instruct them about proper greeting of the dog. YOU need to control the "meeting".
First, instruct the friend to ignore the dog. No look, no talk, no touch. The indication will come from the dog. The dog may become curious and approach the person to smell. Still the person is No look, no talk, no touch. If the dog shows no signs of reluctance, then you can instruct the person to slowly kneel down on one knee, offer the dog one hand palm up for the dog to smell (this is for small dogs). Large dogs the person does not need to kneel. Here again take your cues from the dog's behavior. If the dog remains in calm state without reluctance, then the person can pet the dog. Instruct the person DO NOT PET THE HEAD OR COME FROM ABOVE, ONLY pet the BODY.

My point is all the cues come from the dog's behavior. The human does not approach first.

My silly mini-schnauzer wants to meet everyone. I always follow this guideline. There have been a few times when my dog has shown the first curious sniff, then backed away. This was the cue to stop the meeting. Other times, people have rushed up to pet my dog, I stepped in to halt their approach and prevent the meeting. One of my most difficult encounters was with some kids that would not accept NO when they were rushing in on my dog. I tried to be polite to reject their advances, finally I told the kids "My dog bites". They gave me a strange look, mumbled something then left us alone.
 
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