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Discussion Starter #1
I have a 9 month old Black Lab/Plott hound mix.

Lately, he's been becoming aggressive towards me while walking him on the leash. He'll either try to bite at my ankles or begin biting the leash and pulling away from me and when I reel him in he begins to mouth me. At first, he never bit hard but the last few times it's left a bruise and mark on my left shoulder and finally today he drew blood.

To correct it, I've been pulling him and and then turning him around and holding his back against my chest in the upright setting and saying "NO" firmly. I then wait for him to settle down and we would continue on our walk. This worked at first, but now it's only working half of the time and it's making walks nearly impossible. I tried tipping him onto his side and saying no and holding him on his side until he calms down.

This seemed to work for today, but near the end of the walk, he got mouthy again.

I need help!
 

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What sort of techniques did they teach at doggy daycare? Did they spout a bunch of pack leader and dominance stuff?

I myself have never experienced this issue, so I think it would be best if someone else advised you on what to do.

A few questions that may help people out though. How long has this been going on? How does he walk on the leash otherwise? How is his behavior outside of this?

Sorry if I offended you. It's just that aggression is a very tricky thing to deal with and you don't want to accidentally make it worse.

Do you have any "less aggressive" options? I've been doing this since doggy day care.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Sorry, I meant dog training not dog day care.

He is 100% fine at dog day care, no complaints.

But to answer your questions:

1) This has been going on for roughly two weeks now
2) He walks decent on his leash, usually by my side, but a little ahead of me. Pulls sometimes but I can correct that easily.
3) Outside of this, he's a doll. He sleeps next to me every night and cuddles. Never aggressive towards me or anyone, even when I am not around. He goes to doggy day care at least twice a week.

It's just this situation that is making it rough. I'd rather correct it myself than pay for the half hour sessions at my local dog training facility.
 

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Okay, how do you correct the leash pulling? (That may have something to do with the aggression)

I can understand wanting to correct the issue yourself. I think a good way to start fixing this issue is to teach him that biting and being aggressive doesn't work. When he starts to be aggressive, or even pull "be a tree" http://www.dogforums.com/dog-training-forum/93181-tree.html

Chances are, things are likely to get worse before they get better. Your dog has most likely turned aggressive because he either wants you to do something, or he wants you to stop doing something. Try to wear long sleeves and pants, to protect you a bit.

If he is SUPER aggressive, this method may not be the best because he may become more aggressive and in turn hurt you worse.

When he starts acting up you could put him in a time out. You could have him sit for a few seconds, and then try walking again.

Also, perhaps he has a negative association with the leash and therefore turns aggressive. You could try walking around the house with it on and treating him for behaving well.

You're just going to have t be super consistent with whatever you do and keep your temper. You becoming flustered, or annoyed with the dog will simply rub off on him and make him act worse. You need to learn to calm down before you can expect it from your dog, basically.

I wish you good luck! =]
 

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Will your dog carry a favourite toy in his mouth while he is being walked ? Lots of labs like to do that.

You could also try using a chain-link leash instead of the typical nylon or leather. That may help to deter some of the leash biting, since most dogs don't like the metallic mouth-feel of them.


A better choice might be to incorporate lots of +R when walking, (ie. throw hotdog slices on the ground as you go) for the moments when he isn't misbehaving and is walking politely. IMO you have two basic options: correct the unwanted behaviours and / or reinforce the desired behaviours. You'll likely see as you employ frequent +R that the unwanted behaviours will diminish over time, and therefore as a result, so will the need to correct. Once you have established your expectations clearly, you can cut back to more random and occassional dispensing of treats. Be consistent, and patient, and I believe you will see improvement.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thank you so much for the responses everyone.

Tonight I'll try the "be a tree" thing. That sounds awesome!

I'll bring his toy and chopping up a hot dog is a great idea!

I'll keep everyone up to date!
 

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Discussion Starter #10
not there, but it does not sound like he is "aggressive"
Maybe... aggressive was the wrong word? It just scared me a little bit when he actually mouthed me hard enough to bruise my arm and draw a little blood.

I'm excited to try these new exercise when I take him for a walk when I get done with work.
 

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Try taking your dog to a new location.
A place that he is totally unfamiliar with ...
Example: A Carnival full of sounds and tons of activity.

Now clip on the leash.. and lets go for a walk!!!

The dog doesnt know what to do.. or how to behave...and is probably looking up at you for guidance.
Thats basically the idea .
Getting the dog to look up to you... for instruction and leadership.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Try taking your dog to a new location.
A place that he is totally unfamiliar with ...
Example: A Carnival full of sounds and tons of activity.

Now clip on the leash.. and lets go for a walk!!!

The dog doesnt know what to do.. or how to behave...and is probably looking up at you for guidance.
Thats basically the idea .
Getting the dog to look up to you... for instruction and leadership.
I'm going to try that tonight. I know of a little walking trail not to far from my house that he's never been to.

Last night went better than usual, but he still got aggressive 3 times, but I was able to throw a treat down to distract him and try to get him settled down.

I did have to hold him two times. I'm going to give it a couple days and if I don't see progression I will contact my local dog trainer.
 

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Stop "holding him." That is going to make it worse. Instead, do as others have advised and "be a tree." If his so-called aggression doesn't get him the attention he wants, he'll stop doing it.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Stop "holding him." That is going to make it worse. Instead, do as others have advised and "be a tree." If his so-called aggression doesn't get him the attention he wants, he'll stop doing it.
What do I do if he starts mouthing my arms or feet? Just remain in tree?
 

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Discussion Starter #16
So I brought him out to a trail we've never went to and I do believe this helped.

He did get mouthy once, but that was it and it was easily stopped and left no mark on me.

Looks like I will just have to switch up what paths we take and try to find new ones. I'm still a little afraid to bring him on the normal path now though.
 
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