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Hello,

I am new.

I got a yorkie/shih tzu mix on Saturday. I was told he was eight weeks old. I paid foe him and then, I had his shot record shipped and discovered he will be 8 weeks in mid-July. :(

I am taking him back...but...I still want another puppy but I am afraid of getting another one.
There were some things I did wrong with this one. For example, I gave him the run of the house, I did not teach him to be inside a crate since the beginning and well, it became very difficult to toilet train him as a whole. It was driving me nuts.

I don't know if toilet-training is supposed to be that difficult or if my lack of training and his young age made things more complicated.

Right now, I would like to get a toy poodle.
It is small (I live in an apartment) and supposedly, poodles are smart and easy to train but, I have read that this depends.

I don't want to sound as lazy but I do want to give the best to a dog and I don't know if living in an apartment and working 8-5 pm is good for a puppy.
I would only be able to toilet train him on the weekends...so...

Should I get a puppy or not?
 

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Toilet train him on the weekends?? Really?

I've had jobs and have had dogs, my mother has had full-time jobs and have had dogs... It is possible, but it takes work. It really does... You said you don't want to sound lazy, and I'm sorry if this is harsh, but it sounds to me that you're not expecting to put too much into the dog and want to get everything in return... (If that makes sense.) When it comes to dogs you can't be lazy and selfish. If you're not going to have time for the dog and can only train him on weekends, I would not suggest getting a 'puppy'. Maybe an older dog that's already house-trained would be better...

Yeah, poodles are smart, but so are several other breeds too. I have a "mutt" who is the most intelligent dog I've come across... And when you're dedicated to training, training will be easier...
 

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Hello,

I am new.

I got a yorkie/shih tzu mix on Saturday. I was told he was eight weeks old. I paid foe him and then, I had his shot record shipped and discovered he will be 8 weeks in mid-July. :(

I am taking him back...but...I still want another puppy but I am afraid of getting another one.
You totally lost me here. You got a puppy, but then gave him back because he was 8 weeks old? Why? Please explain.

Also, potty training can be extremely difficult and can take a really long time. My Belle was probably a year old before she was fully potty trained, but Penny is 6 months and hasn't had an accident in a long time. It depends on the dog...but be warned, potty training is usually A LOT of work.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I meant, I would only be able to toilet train a puppy with good timing on the weekends.

It seems odd to me to get a puppy on a Saturday and then have to abandon it on a Monday.
I am getting the idea that successful toilet training is more than dedication, it is also timing.
I will go back to school in August. Maybe it would be a good idea to wait until I get school vacation and get a puppy then.

Even the owners I have talked to regarding the toy poodles are stay at home moms or took a week off to potty train them.

I mean, what happens to the puppy while you go to work in terms of going to the potty?

I am trying to find a way to do this.

I could start on a Saturday, crate him and use a training pad...but, what happens on Monday then?
 

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If you are afraid of getting a pup, don't get it, period..

You have to overcome the fear of responsability by taking care of a grown dog... go around your neighbor, offer to walk or give baths to your local dogs.

Read ALOT on dogs. that is the most i can tell you.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Emily

He is not eight weeks old yet. I did not know that. The owner lied to me.

There are certain things that he does that concern me and I don't know if it is due to his very young age.
There is something about his socialization skills that seem a tad bit off but I don't know if this is just him being a puppy or the fact that I got him too young.
 

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So you got rid of a puppy because you wouldn't be able to toilet-train it? I am still confused.

I got Belle on a Friday and went back to school on a Monday. It took longer to potty train her, than Penny...I think because we got Penny over my spring break so I had a week to potty train her. She only had one accident in her crate, whereas Belle had several.
 

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Not to be pushy... And it's none of my business if you don't want to answer... But are you still in grade-school/high-school or college?

I'm asking, because I thought with college you had a less time consuming schedule... I could be wrong. :p

Potty training a "puppy" has to be an every day thing... You can't just wait until Saturday to train him... I mean- It might work, but it would take far too long to accomplish a house-trained puppy.

A house-trained puppy is usually crate-trained as well, at the same time as far as I know, and while you're at school/work the puppy is in the crate, and if he's house-trained well he will more than likely hold his business until you get home...

Like I said, I'd suggest getting an older dog, one that's maybe a rescue but is already house-trained... It doesn't really sound like you'll have a lot of time to train a puppy. Just my suggestion.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
If you are afraid of getting a pup, don't get it, period..

You have to overcome the fear of responsability by taking care of a grown dog... go around your neighbor, offer to walk or give baths to your local dogs.

Read ALOT on dogs. that is the most i can tell you.
I am starting to think this too.

Ideally, I would own a bigger breed dog but I can't since I live in an apartment.
 

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Deege, In my experience, college is less time consuming than high school. But then again, I only had part time work to no work during school.

And yeah, I agree...if you only potty train a dog on weekends, it will never get potty trained...
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Not to be pushy... And it's none of my business if you don't want to answer... But are you still in grade-school/high-school or college?
I am starting graduate school in the fall.

A house-trained puppy is usually crate-trained as well, at the same time as far as I know, and while you're at school/work the puppy is in the crate, and if he's house-trained well he will more than likely hold his business until you get home...
But, don't puppies usually have a harder time with holding it?
So, isn't it possible that the puppy will soil the crate until I get back?

I have read it is not recommended to leave puppies inside crates for more than 30 mins-one hour.
 

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I am starting to think this too.

Ideally, I would own a bigger breed dog but I can't since I live in an apartment.
I'm sort of confused at this...

Just because you live an apartment, doesn't mean you can't have a bigger breed of dog; Unless it's stated in the lease agreement...

Just because you get a bigger breed of dog, won't make it any more smarter, and you'd still have to take time to house-train it as a puppy... You probably know that though, right?

Heh, no- You can leave a puppy or dog in a crate as long as you need to; Most people on here who have dogs that use crates leave them in them for 8 hours or more... Puppies do have a harder time holding their business, but that's where house-training comes into play. It helps them not make a mess in the house and helps train them to hold it for longer periods of time.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I'm sort of confused at this...

Just because you live an apartment, doesn't mean you can't have a bigger breed of dog; Unless it's stated in the lease agreement...
I don't know. I don't feel comfortable with having a big dog in an apartment. I feel bad since I would want him/her to have a yard and grass to run around.

Heh, no- You can leave a puppy or dog in a crate as long as you need to; Most people on here who have dogs that use crates leave them in them for 8 hours or more... Puppies do have a harder time holding their business, but that's where house-training comes into play. It helps them not make a mess in the house and helps train them to hold it for longer periods of time.
Now I am confused. Maybe I got all of this potty-training business wrong.
So....what I am getting is that one feeds puppy, takes puppy out or indoor train them and after puppy does his business then you leave him inside the crate until one comes back from work.

Is this the idea?

So, one can crate a puppy for more than 3 hours then?

But, this would take time anyways. I think I am going to stick with waiting until I can dedicate ample time to potty training.
I still have vacation hours from work. I could use them. We shall see.

What literature do you recommend for potty training or at least, advice in general.
 

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You've got it right!

I mean, that's what I would do, that's what other have done.

I'm glad you're open-minded! : D Good luck, and I'm glad you're reconsidering. : )

I don't have any "potty-training" books on hand, but I'm sure others here will have plenty of literature you can read up on!

As far as "big dogs" in "small apartments" go... I used to feel the same way you did, but at the same time, a dog doesn't pine for a big house and yard, they wouldn't know the difference. As long as you'd walk them plenty, and give them plenty of fun at a park or something, it'd be fine... I know several big dogs, from my business, that live in an apartment... I take care of a husky, two Pitties, and one Labradoodle, they live in apartments... But that's what I'm there for I guess, lol! I give them plenty of walks during the day while their owners are at work.
 

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Agreed. You could live in a box as long as the dog gets enough mental and physical exercise.

OP, why not consider a cat until you have more time? Dogs NEED to see you and spend time with you to be happy and well adjusted. Carefully consider if you have the time/commitment to care for one.:)
 

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Grad school is not a great time to be getting a puppy IMO. Unless you're one of those lucky, lucky people who don't have to work while you're going through school. And even THEN you're still going to be quite busy. I like the idea of an older, rescue dog who is already house broken. But whether you get a puppy or an adult, and no matter what breed or what size, a dog is an incredible commitment and takes a LOT of work: daily training AND exercise (even if you have a smaller breed and even if you did have a huge back yard), not to mention that they are more expensive than just the initial cost of purchase. In other words, i think if you're finding yourself having second thoughts, it probably isn't the right time.
 

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Adopt an older dog that is already potty trained and can hold it for longer if you really NEED to have a dog. I would suggest a cat, litter box training is a breeze.

about the puppy. it has nothing to do with that pups age, you just need to put WORK into it! yaa thats right, WORK! potty training isnt easy and it sure as hell isnt fun lol People HAVE potty trained puppies that have full time jobs, It just takes more work and takes longer.

Do a little research on crate training, potty training puppies etc..

There are some things useful for small dog owners.. Dog litter boxes, Newspaper, etc.. they are annoying to clean up, but it would be useful if your not home enough to take the dog out. but then again, if your not home enough to walk your dog, you really probably shouldn't have one..

Look at your schedule, write it down. then really consider the TIME AND WORK it takes for a dog. to be fed twice a day, played with, walked twice a day, for a puppy, taken out every couple of hours. etc..

A cat, or older rescue dog would be a much better solution for you IMO
 

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I live in a small two-bedroom apartment with my family... Myself, my mother, and my two sisters, ages 6yrs and 12yrs... I'm 98% positive Donatello is Manchester/JR Terrier-mix... Read up on both of those dogs. lol! And you'll find that a dog like Donatello has enough engery, that if I could somehow... Tap into and harness that energy to fuel the world, 56 generations in the future would still have their lights on! lmao!

Donatello is such a couch-potato... SUCH a couch-potato! But when I get him some place to run off-leash... OMG watch-oooooout! He's like a Greyhound when he runs, lol... Or like my grandpa said, "He runs like a deer!" (My grandpa met him a few times and still asks about him when we talk.) : P I think my grandpa is smitten.

Anyway... Dogs can get accustomed to their environment, just like we can... That doesn't mean it's okay to just leave them like that, they still need exercise and they still need to let loose and be a dog... : P
 

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If you're having doubts about whether you can commit to taking care of a pup, I would recommend looking into foster options. Fostering works like this: you take in a rescue puppy that doesn't have a forever home, and you take care of the pup as if he were your own until he is adopted out. If things don't work out with the pup, you can return him to the rescue, though obviously this is not the preferred course of action. If things do work out, you can offer to adopt him and be his forever home.

It'll give you experience as to how raising a pup works... in other words, how much havoc is REALLY wrecked on your schedule. :D
 
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