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Hi everyone.
We just got a new puppy, Piper. She is 7 weeks old and is a valley bulldog (for those not familiar with the breed it originated by crossing a boxer with an English bulldog, so they are kind of a hybrid of the two.) While our first dog, Rosie was submissive and eager to please, Piper seems to be the exact opposite, pushing boundaries and not really to concerned with what we have to say.
She really is a sweetheart, but like any puppy she has ALOT of learning to do, and I have so much work to do with her I feel completely overwhelmed. She is smart, that much is clear. I was able to teach her to sit in only a couple minutes.
The problem that I am having is that she only wants to do things when SHE wants to do them, not when I tell her to. She is learning the command "leave it" but it is really hit or miss as to whether or not she will listen, even if I have the treat in my hand and in front of her nose. And if I remove an object from her path or her mouth, she tries FRANTICALLY to get it back, despite lots of correction (stern "no!"s and even a tap on the nose.) When she DOES do the wanted behaviour I have been using the clicker, giving her a treat and giving lots of praise.
A friend of mine suggested putting on her back NOT as a submissive vs dominance thing, but more so that I could stop her in one of those frantic moments (fighting me from picking her up, trying to fight her way back to the object and even hard nipping) of trying to do that bad behaviour and keep her out of harms way while not even looking at her. I tried it but she SCREAMED and I'm pretty sure I only succeeded in scaring her and that's the last thing I want. I want to have a strong bond with her just like I do with our other dog Rosie. At this point however, I feel like I am constantly after her and constantly frustrated and I know she can pick up on that.
I don't know how "stern" I should be or how lenient I should be, especially at her age. She is still young. How should I react to her whining? How should I correct her biting? Even playfully she broke skin today, but when I "yelped" (a high pitched OUTCH!) and let my hand go limp like I read you should do, she continued to hang on. And what about Kennel training? She has been doing ok for most of the night but around 6:00 AM she is up and refuses to stay in her kennel. We have been taking her into the bed until she falls asleep (which is pretty quickly.) then placing her back in her kennel, because it seems to be the only way we can get her to stay in there after that point.
As you can tell, I have TONS of questions, and am completely overwhelmed. All of this has pretty much clouded the excitement of having a new puppy!! :( Any information and feed back would be greatly appreciated.
Thanks!
 

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I don't know how "stern" I should be or how lenient I should be, especially at her age.
I would lean more towards "lenient" at this stage. She has no idea, YET, what your expectations of her are. Teaching her thoroughly first will take much time and patience, so, do this before you even *think* of adding in any sternness. Although, that said, personally I don't think there's any place for sternness in dog training but maybe that's just me.

Have you read the stickies / searched here for bite inhibition, impulse control, crate training etc ? lots of good pointers to be found, if not maybe you could break your current issues down into singular form and post threads for each one individually. You're likely to get more responses and some good personal advice that way.

Oh, and don't listen to your friend's suggestions. As you unfortunately discovered they obviously have no idea, at least not good ones. If you're having difficulties with your pup either ask for advice here or hire a good, professional trainer.
 

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At 7 weeks, there's no way she understands what you want. At all. She's learning things, but it takes day or weeks to proof even a simple cue to the point that the dog understands it in multiple situations. I've been working on leave it with my puppy for 4 weeks now and I still can't ask her to leave a random papertowel on the ground during or walk - she understands the cue in the house in training conditions, but it's not generalized or proofed yet. It takes time.

Also, dogs don't understand "no", and a stern tap on the nose is likely to scare a dog or make it want to play. It's likely that your other dog was just soft and sensitive and did not want to make you angry, but your new puppy doesn't really understand or care what anger is. That's fine! She is a harder dog. But it does mean that you actually have to teach her what you want, and manage her when she doesn't know what you want, because you're not going to get away with a stern word or look.

If she bites, say ouch and then leave. Leave the area, leave the room, whatever it takes. Many many puppies do not respond to just a yelp, so you will have to be more obvious with ending play and interaction when she bites.
 

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Thanks both of your feedback including tips in whee I find more info and where to post. I am definitely thinking about hiring a dog trainer, not so much for her, but for me!
 

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Thanks both of your feedback including tips in whee I find more info and where to post. I am definitely thinking about hiring a dog trainer, not so much for her, but for me!
That's a great idea! However, you want a positive trainer, so investigate before you hire, and if anything comes up in session, don't hesitate to protect your puppy! Stick away from "balanced" "traditional" "Cesar Milan" "dominance/dominant" and any usage of special collars, or really collars at all. You want someone who uses a clicker and treats. That's it. The trainer really shouldn't have to touch the dog at all, unless they're training the dog to accept touch.

The reason I say to be careful in session is that force-based trainers know the tide is turning and will often advertise themselves as being "positive" and then suddenly pull out punishments galore during training. I called a trainer who said all the right things, used all the right buzzwords, up until she said, "of course if your dog goes for grandma's throat, a cookie won't help you. " Um, I called about a 40lb dog and told you he was very passive and timid. Not sure why we suddenly started talking about Cujo, but, no, I don't want to schedule anything now. Or ever. (Of course, no positive trainer in the world would wave around a treat while a dog tried to kill someone.)
 
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