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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi! This is my first time here and first off, I’d like to say that I really appreciate the respectful and helpful manner of the discussions. It is very refreshing. That being said, let’s get down to business.

My boyfriend and I are adopting two female Chesapeake Bay Retrievers. They are 2.5 years and have been together since birth. Their current family is awesome but needs to rehome because they don’t have time to give them to attention the need. Mad respect to them for making that decision! My boyfriend and I both lost our respective pups within the past year. The house has been pretty quiet so we said, “the only thing better than 1 dog is 2!”

About the pups: They have spent their first 2 years of life in a loving household which was also an in home daycare facility so they have been around infants, toddlers and children and reportedly, they do great with the kiddos. They were also around other dogs and did great. From what we experienced in the hour or so we spent with them, they are the definition of what google says 2.5 year old chessies are. They barked at us for a minute when we came in, they had a keen but not overly protective eye out for their owner’s sake and A LOT of energy. They know basic commands but I think could still use a fair deal of training.

About us: We have done loads of research, have discussed exercise, further training, routines, etc. My boyfriend and I work opposite schedules and I work from home so they would rarely be alone. They would obviously have each other as well.

Our plan is that when I wake up, I feed them, let them out in the fully fenced and secured yard for bathroom and throw the ball a bit before I have to get to work. When my boyfriend gets up, he takes them for a walk, plays fetch or whatever the pups are happy doing, playtime wise, and then takes one off without the other for some one on one training. When I get off work in the evening, I walk them together and take the other out for some one on one training.

Obviously, nothing is perfect and this schedule will vary but that’s the ideal for us.

So, here are my questions if anyone has experience with this breed or just general insight:

1. Does this plan sound like it will be enough exercise/socalization?

2. Any tips for welcoming dogs that have had loving families acclimate to a new household? I have only had abused pups in the past and I feel like that may be a different ballgame.

3. How long should we continue their normal routine before we start to modify it with what works best for our household? Example: At their current house, they sleep in crates in the garage at night but we are more of a free range household.

4. How do I train them to grab us a beer out of the fridge?
-Just kidding (sort of?)

I know that was long but thank you for reading. Any advice is greatly appreciated!
 

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1. Sure, sounds greats.

2. Treat them like puppies, meaning closely manage them at first by limiting their freedom using crates or baby gates. Take them out for frequent potty breaks when they are up and active. You probably don't have to supervise 100% hawk eye like a puppy, but its a new house that they don't know the rules of, so watch them closely. Set boundaries immediately. Dogs don't generalize well, so they'll likely need potty training refreshers and house manners refreshers.

3. Dogs are more adaptable than you think. Start them on your routine, but closely manage them, as I said before. You can certainly move to a free range environment, but at first I would keep them crated or at least confined to a single room where they can't get into much until they learn the rules of your house. It can take around 3 months for dogs to fully acclimate to your home

4. YouTube.

The only thing I would worry about is littermate syndrome...You said they have been together all their lives and the current owners didn't have a lot of time for them, which worries me. Can the dogs be separated without throwing a fit? I mean, you can certainly have dogs with littermate syndrome, but know that they can become completely and totally dependent on each other. They can't go to the vet separately, they can't be walked separately, and sometimes they even have to be in the same room or they panic! Have you asked the current owners about that? Verified that they don't have it? They are adults, so there is no quick fix for it if their current owners didn't take measures to feed, train, and crate the dogs separately until they formed a bond with the humans.

Here is a short article on littermate syndrome you may want to check out, in addition to your own research.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thank you so much, Lillith! This is super helpful. Thank you for the article as well. This is actually the first time I am hearing of littermate syndrome so I have not asked the current owners about it but I certainly will.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
1. Sure, sounds greats.

2. Treat them like puppies, meaning closely manage them at first by limiting their freedom using crates or baby gates. Take them out for frequent potty breaks when they are up and active. You probably don't have to supervise 100% hawk eye like a puppy, but its a new house that they don't know the rules of, so watch them closely. Set boundaries immediately. Dogs don't generalize well, so they'll likely need potty training refreshers and house manners refreshers.

3. Dogs are more adaptable than you think. Start them on your routine, but closely manage them, as I said before. You can certainly move to a free range environment, but at first I would keep them crated or at least confined to a single room where they can't get into much until they learn the rules of your house. It can take around 3 months for dogs to fully acclimate to your home

4. YouTube.

The only thing I would worry about is littermate syndrome...You said they have been together all their lives and the current owners didn't have a lot of time for them, which worries me. Can the dogs be separated without throwing a fit? I mean, you can certainly have dogs with littermate syndrome, but know that they can become completely and totally dependent on each other. They can't go to the vet separately, they can't be walked separately, and sometimes they even have to be in the same room or they panic! Have you asked the current owners about that? Verified that they don't have it? They are adults, so there is no quick fix for it if their current owners didn't take measures to feed, train, and crate the dogs separately until they formed a bond with the humans.

Here is a short article on littermate syndrome you may want to check out, in addition to your own research.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Lillith,

We got the pups today and they are awesome! I don’t think we are going to have to worry about littermate syndrome. They are super playful with one another and like to keep the other in sight but are also independent in their own way. Thank you again for your words of wisdom. Much appreciated!
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That's great! I hope you have fun with the new additions to your family!
 
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