Puppy Forum and Dog Forums banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
583 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
So, the dog I thought we would get from a rescue was given to someone else.... but they have told us that we are acceptable rescuers and have suggested a dog to us. That said, we still might not get it if they determine someone is better suited for this dog..... and that is why I am here.

This dog was rescued from an Amish farm. She was in a cage with many other dogs..... 2 year old female lab. The foster mom described this dog as 100% "shut down" when she got the dog. She has had the dog for 2 months now. She said the dog LOVES other dogs.... but is afraid of some people. Fortunately there is NO AGGRESSION in this dog.

I have 2 normal, well behaved, quiet dogs that do like to play outside. So does the rescue dog from the video I have seen.

So, I know they will question us about why we should get this dog, and all I really have is "I have rescued 4 dogs in my life. You came to my house and met two of them, and you could see that they are good dogs."

Just my opinion, but at 2 years old, I think patience, love, and good training will help this dog tremendously..... I think we can offer those 3 things..... ( we are used to always having 3 dogs. Sadly my Golden Retriever died 2 months ago.... she was 13 )

We have the finances and the space for another dog. Is there anything I am not thinking of that I could say to them if needed?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,296 Posts
Puppy mill dogs statistically have a higher chance of some fear issues and may or may not ever be 'normal', but they still deserve loving homes nonetheless. And some dogs from those cases are astoundingly resilient too. I would recommend meeting the dog and also educating yourself on dogs from these situations. Here is a good resource with a very detailed downloadable article: https://bestfriends.org/resources/caring-dogs-rescued-puppy-mills
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
583 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Puppy mill dogs statistically have a higher chance of some fear issues and may or may not ever be 'normal', but they still deserve loving homes nonetheless. And some dogs from those cases are astoundingly resilient too. I would recommend meeting the dog and also educating yourself on dogs from these situations. Here is a good resource with a very detailed downloadable article: https://bestfriends.org/resources/caring-dogs-rescued-puppy-mills
Ah, well we don't know if she was a puppy mill puppy, but we do know that she was never used for breeding... I will read the link... TY.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,373 Posts
I wish you luck. This dog, if kept kenneled with little human contact, missed all the windows to experience handling by people and being around people related things. Of course, there may very well be a genetic component as well.

This dog will find dogs more comfortable to be around than people and may never be a "normal" dog.

Good luck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
254 Posts
My friend adopted (probably 6 or so years ago now) an amazingly sweet, and pretty much shut down, Dogue de Bordeaux (French mastiff) from the local humane society. The backstory as I can remember it, was she was used for breeding (likely puppy mill-ish) then was adopted out for about 6 months, then came back which is when my friend found her. At the time this poor girl was terrified of almost everything (but same thing as you said, she has never ever snapped at anyone), but my friend is the most patient person you will meet. Slowly Duchess learned to play with toys, and do 'normal' dog things, though my friend has never been able to work with her in any sort of tricks/obedience manner - Duchess just has zero interest in anything like that. Thankfully she's a sweetheart and is just 'good' - she does listen and is often off leash, but you'll never see her doing silly tricks. A few years ago they got a puppy, and weren't sure how Duchess would react, but in fact it's helped her so much! The pup, now adult, has almost been a therapy dog for Duchess. My friend noticed a very positive change in how Duchess reacts to things and handles stressors now that they have the second dog, and the two girls will wrestle and play and are just great friends.

So, long story short, haha, if this girl seems like she will be a good fit for your family, and you have "low" expectations for her, you might be really rewarded watching her come out of her shell and start to enjoy life and learn how fun it all can be. It will really depend on this dog specifically, but I just wanted to post a feel good story about someone who took the chance and it worked out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,727 Posts
I have a rescue Poodle, a 25 Lb. Miniature. I got her knowing that she probably would never be able to be "normal" as she had lived from the time she was a puppy, in a box stall, never out, just fed and watered as they tried to get her bred. I got her when she was about two years old. That was in August of last year and it has been great to see her gradually coming out of her shell. From a dog that I could not get hold of to one that I can walk up to outside with a leash and collar and put it on. She would not go through a door or gate unless you stood way back and even then she bolted through whether on or off leash to one that just walks through like any of my dogs. A lot of it has been having other well trained dogs. She has a good temperament as no matter how scared she has been, she has never snapped ever.

With time and patience and not expecting too much too soon, I think you can socialize them to a certain point. I don't expect this dog to ever by comfortable around strangers but that is fine with me, she does not have to interact with anyone but me and it has just been a little over a year since I got her.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,727 Posts
Should have mentioned they never did get her bred, then had the nerve to contact me and say could they have her back as they found someone who could breed her artificially. I had her spayed just after I got her so that put an end to that.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
7,351 Posts
I wish you luck. This dog, if kept kenneled with little human contact, missed all the windows to experience handling by people and being around people related things. Of course, there may very well be a genetic component as well.

This dog will find dogs more comfortable to be around than people and may never be a "normal" dog.

Good luck!
Do please tell that to the Sheltie I had as a kid who was spent the first year of her life in a puppy mill barn with virtually no human contact. She was beyond terrified of people when we got her, I spent weeks coaxing her out from under the table with treats, and it took her a full year to fully trust us. That dog flourished into a fabulous, and yes, "normal" dog after that first year and you would never have known she came out of such a terrible situation. Please quit labeling every situation with these black and white labels. They are entirely inaccurate, completely unhelpful, and potentially very harmful.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,834 Posts
Labs are pretty resilient. They seem to come out of nasty situations and be fine. Of course, there is always a chance she may remain shy and not the happy-go-lucky-social-butterfly that most Labs are, but that doesn't mean she can't be a good dog. I think you having dog buddies for her will be very helpful.

I think you should be very honest about your experience and your situation with the rescuers. You should tell them you have researched and considered her temperament and your dedication to making sure she is comfortable and her boundaries are respected (if you have indeed done that!). If the rescue feels a different home is better for her, I wouldn't take it personally. They do know the dog best and probably know what would be in her best interest.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,296 Posts
Sorry, I read "This dog was rescued from an Amish farm. She was in a cage with many other dogs." and made an assumption. My bad!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,475 Posts
For what it's worth, my good old girl (currently 17 years old and still kicking) was whelped in a junkyard and not handled by people until the mom and pups were brought to a rescue when the pups were already coming up on a year old. By the time I'd had her a year or so she wasn't really distinguishable from a dog that'd been properly socialized. The hardest part was teaching her how to interact appropriately with humans - she's a naturally very bold dog in terms of temperament, so she was never afraid of people, but she basically tried to treat us like fellow dogs. But with lots of repetition and redirection and positive reinforcement she eventually got there. I think it's less of a problem if they were with other dogs than if they were alone, because being isolated can make them crazy rather than just feral-ish. Feral you can work with, psychologically damaged from lack of interaction is a lot harder.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top