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Currently my household consists of myself, my boyfriend of three years (Matt), and our 6 year old Westie (Greg). Greg belonged to Matt first, but he and I have really bonded since we've been living together.

Recently we've been talking about adopting a shelter dog, but we're at odds about some of the details. Greg has never been well socialized, so we're planning to take him to doggie day camps to give him a little experience with how to behave around other dogs. If he does well at those, we'll move forward, but we can't decide on whether to get a female or a male.

I am of the opinion that since Greg is neutered, and whatever dog we adopt will be neutered as well, that having two male dogs in the household would be fine once they've established a pack order and had some time to get used to each other. Matt feels that we can only really bring a female dog into the house, which I would be fine with, if it weren't for Crockett..

Crockett is a young terrier/lab mix (he's on the small side, likely won't get any larger than 45 lbs or so) that I fell in love with at the shelter. He's an affectionate, playful boy that doesn't seem to be exceptionally high energy but still has plenty of that puppy eagerness that is impossible to resist. The shelter requires that we bring Greg in when we plan to adopt so they can see how the two dogs behave together, so that makes for a nice trial run, but Matt is so reluctant to even attempt to get a male dog that I feel like I should just cross my fingers that someone else adopts Crockett before I have to tell myself it isn't going to happen.

In short, how poor a decision would it be to get a young neutered male when we already have a middle-aged neutered Westie?
 

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Others may have more experience in this area, as I've only ever had female dogs, but, then again, I've only ever had female dogs. Same-sex aggression is actually more prominent in females, but we've had no trouble. I think the age difference between Missy (the older chihuahua/terrier mix) and Cricket (the younger yorkie) made all the difference.

Nobody can say whether same-sex aggression will occur, but since your current dog will be a good deal older than the new dog, and they're both neutered (which may or may not alleviate some tension), I think the chances are greatly reduced.

That is, IF Greg does well with other dogs and if you introduce the two properly. Regardless of gender, if Greg is not a dog-friendly dog, it probably won't work.
 

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Really, this is all about Greg. It is known that male-female pairings are best, but it's a general rule, not true for every dog. It's possible Greg could get along fine with another male, or that he won't be able to get along with any other dogs at all.

I would say bring Greg in to meet Crockett, but if it doesn't work, it doesn't work. You can try to make Greg and Crockett get along, and maybe eventually get them to the point of not fighting all the time, but you can't make them like one another.
 

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Thanks so much for the input!

I wish we knew more people in the area with dogs, but unfortunately we haven't been here very long and our opportunities to socialize Greg have been limited. We are planning to take him to a doggie day camp a few times to see how he handles being up close and personal with males, females, and dogs with various temperaments. Once we've done that, I think we'll try to take him to the shelter to meet Crockett and a few other dogs we were interested in to try and find a good fit.

If Crockett gets adopted before we can finish the process, I'd be a little bit sad, but happy to see that he's been given a home. Though there are particular breeds we're very interested in looking at, we're in agreement that the best thing we can do is adopt a shelter dog. I think I've been watching too much Dogtown lately..
 

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If Crockett gets adopted before we can finish the process, I'd be a little bit sad, but happy to see that he's been given a home. Though there are particular breeds we're very interested in looking at, we're in agreement that the best thing we can do is adopt a shelter dog. I think I've been watching too much Dogtown lately..
I think that a shelter dog is a great idea. Older dogs will sometimes tolerate very young puppies and then hate them when they get older. With an adult shelter dog, you know what you're getting right away.

Definitely watch Greg closely as he interacts. I've noticed that Kabota likes females more than males, though he does like males, and really seems to like poodle mixes a lot. I could not begin to tell you why my dog loves labradoodles and goldendoodles, but there it is.
 

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I have two male dogs and they are true buddies. We had Clyde for 6 months (he was 2 years old when we got him) before we started looking at other dogs. We always took Clyde with us and it was really easy to tell who he liked and who he didn't. He liked both males and females, but males seemed to like him better than females for whatever reason. Don't get discouraged though as the process might take awhile. We literally met with 12 dogs at 4 different shelters over the course of 2 weeks before we found Wally. It could also be he might want to be an only dog too, but he will definitely let you know.
 
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