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So a week ago me and my other half adopted a dog, Alsatian cross border collie. He was such a loving dog and was reasonably well trained although it was clear to us quite quickly that he was obviously miss treated in his previous home. The shelter where we got him from had only had him for 2 days before they asked for a donation of £400 which was reduced to £300.
After having him a week everything was going very well until out of the blue he attacked our 3 year old daughter (she suffered scratches and a bruise on her cheek) we then took him back to the shelter where they took him back.
just wondering if their is any such law where we could be entitled to the donation back or whether they didn’t have him long enough to see what he was really like, just asking for any advice really. Thanks in advance
 

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I agree with storyist. But, at least in the US, if they call it a donation, you can't get it back. (short of suing them, which is quite unnecessary) Perhaps if you talk with them, they'd be willing to do an "exchange"

Just know that if you get another, your dog and daughter will need to be supervised. Your daughter will definitely need to be taught to respect the dog, to whatever extent she's capable of at such a young age (I'm sure you are aware, I'm just stressing this point). Dogs don't just attack for no reason. It could be possible that your duaughter did something that, while acceptable to humans, was scary to the dog, such as giving eye contact, being loud or moving quickly or touching the face, tail, or feet. Since you don't know the dog's history, it could have been an innocent mistake such as wearing something or holding her hand in a way that reminded him of something from his past. Or, the reaction could have been to something else in the environment, and your daughter, unfortunately, was what he channeled his fear onto. However, monitor any dog you get for stress signals when they're with your child. If the dog shows any of these, (wide eyes, ears pinned back, yawning, lip licking, tail between legs, and many more) separate them immediately (even if the stress is from another source. Stressed dogs are unpredictable and should be kept away from children). A stressed dog may very well lash out. As your daughter gets older, she'll need less and less supervision, but always be careful.
 
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