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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Got this doggo from a shelter. She's 6 months old, 15kg, and a mixed breed.
I suspect she has some boxer and Carpathian shepherd blood. But it doesn't matter to me that much.
I just want her to grow a happy and healthy doggie. So I'm trying to see that she gets all of the vitamins and nutrients for her to not have health problems later in life.
But I'm not sure she had the best diet while at the shelter. The weird thing about her shape is that she has the hind legs quite long, compared to her front ones, and her torso is always sloping forward down. She has a hard time looking at me without sitting. It also makes her very clumsy. For example, when playing fetch she always loses balance and almost tumbles over, the hind legs having too much inertia.
She also loves to run and does the zoomies quite often, getting those hind legs to propel her like a rocket. Jumping a lot. She doesn't miss the leg day at the gym :D

Could this be a health problem, based on her previous diet? Or is it normal, puppies' body parts growing at different speeds maybe?
PS: first time dog owner, worried AF :D. But the joy on her face is priceless.

Plant Vertebrate Dog breed Carnivore Dog
Dog Sky Plant Cloud Dog breed
Plant Dog Dog breed Tree Working animal
 

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It may even out a little as she matures, but she'll likely always be high in the rear. For many dogs it's not that big a deal, and you can do some gentle conditioning work to help her learn rear end awareness and build core strength to help support her structurally - gentle is the key while she's still growing, though! This work will also likely help some with the clumsiness, though some of that is just being a growing puppy who isn't used to her body yet.

If you're on Facebook, the group Canine Conditioning and Body Awareness Exercises is very helpful. If you have access to a canine physiotherapist or chiropractor and can reasonably afford the splurge, it might be worth getting her evaluated so they can offer you a personalized exercise program. But keep in mind that this is above an beyond stuff - if you're not seeing evidence of pain or difficulty doing certain kinds of movements/exercises (beyond her being a little awkward and clumsy), it's absolutely not necessary, especially if you're not planning to do physically demanding work or sports with her (agility, flyball, mushing, etc.).
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
But keep in mind that this is above an beyond stuff - if you're not seeing evidence of pain or difficulty doing certain kinds of movements/exercises (beyond her being a little awkward and clumsy), it's absolutely not necessary, especially if you're not planning to do physically demanding work or sports with her (agility, flyball, mushing, etc.).
Thanks for the fb group and for the advice.

I'm quite active and she really loves to run. So I'd like to try some trail running with her, or long hiking, once she becomes a fully grown adult. So with that goal in mind, I'm trying to offer her the best nutrition and exercise to develop strong and healthy.
 

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Sounds like a great plan! I mentioned sports because they often have especially physically demanding elements like sharp turns at high speed and repetitive jumping, moreso than what dogs tend to do when they're free running or hiking, so it can be really important to have a professional assess whether they're structurally sound enough to participate, especially at competitive levels. But more free-form exercise has fewer of those risks, though of course you still don't want to go on super long or demanding hikes or runs until her growth plates are closed and she's mostly done growing. Sounds like you know that already, though! She's lucky to have you.
 
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