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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
She is a Treeing Walker Coonhound named Royal. She's very friendly around the house, easy to manage. VERY cuddly, sometimes aggressively so. Once in a while she will put her front paws up on the couch and seemingly try to climb us like a tree when we're trying to relax. She has sharp claws, so that's no fun. We can't just ignore her, it is painful. We take hold of her front legs, put her down, and say no. Sometimes it works after 3 or 4, sometimes 8 or 10 and usually a walk to her blanket.
Is this method going to sink in eventually?

She is not very accepting of her dog neighbors. We have a ~4' wooden fence with space between the planks that is easy to see through. When the dogs come out she barks and growls at them immediately and constantly, they return the gesture -- there are 4 or 5, one is a boxer mix that is as unhappy about the situation as Royal is. They usually just take their dogs right back in after only a few seconds. Seems to me that will just prolong the problem. If we'd just let them deal with each other once in a while I think they might eventually start to accept each other's presence. Maybe? No?

Out and about -- on walks, she's generally ok -- other than the constant stopping to sniff and hunt, which is no big deal. I always try to explain to my 9 y/o that it's how she's wired and as long as she's not damaging anyone's flowers or whatever -- it's fine. We walked along a busy street the other day, 15-20 cars go by us 40-45 mph within 10-15 ft of us and she's fine. Then all of a sudden for no apparent reason she BOLTS 90 degrees directly at a car. What the...!?! My 9 y/o had the leash at the time. Luckily he was able to get his base quick enough to restrain her. It was a tense moment. They both could have ended up in traffic. Then a couple more cars pass -- and she reacts, but comparatively slight, then after that she's basically fine...weirdo. Thoughts?

She HATES bicycles. Again, weirdo.
She can walk along beside traffic and be fine (the above instance notwithstanding), but on the other side of the 4 lane street with cars zipping between us, she'll see a bike and go berserk. What's with that?

Probably the most pressing issue at the moment: We passed a fellow dog walker the other night, about sunset, getting pretty dark. She went into attack mode.
Apparently, I'm supposed to just act like its no big deal and she's supposed to follow my lead, eventually. But if I do that right now, she'd have had the dog for dinner. I guess I'm supposed to cross the street or something to create space, maybe keep her from flipping out until maybe, at some point in the future her reactions won't be quite as intense??
 

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http://www.dogforums.com/dog-training-forum/191506-links-books-blogs-etc.html

Much of what you describe is common to reactivity (leash/barrier reactivity particularly) along with general impulse control

While working on training, only an adult should have control of the leash on walks outside your property and an adult should always be present when the dog is loose in the yard (not saying that isn't the case, just making a general comment).
 

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There's a lot going on - how long has it been since your new pup came home? My first thoughts are mostly about the yard thing...

I wouldn't let her loose in the yard just yet; as annoying as it sounds, I'd keep her on a leash and only let her get as close to the fence as she could handle without growling. Not forever, just while you're working this out. You can counter condition by rewarding with a treat when she looks at the other dogs, but doesn't growl (I'm working on the same thing with my dog when it comes to on-leash encounters with other dogs). Ideally you want her to notice the other dog, then get her to look at you right after ("Look at that!" or give a "Watch" command) and then treat. Some other kind of barrier to create distance between her and the fence would work, too, I just can't think of anything economical off the top of my head!

Actually, it's the same thing in the back yard as on a walk, although I'm optimistic and thinking you'll get the yard situation settled sooner than the leash-walking-reactivity situation. A dog on a leash meeting another dog on a leash just isn't a very natural situation. Cross the street, turn around, get on the other side of a car, it's all better than letting her get over the top excited.
 

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She is a Treeing Walker Coonhound named Royal. She's very friendly around the house, easy to manage. VERY cuddly, sometimes aggressively so. Once in a while she will put her front paws up on the couch and seemingly try to climb us like a tree when we're trying to relax. She has sharp claws, so that's no fun. We can't just ignore her, it is painful. We take hold of her front legs, put her down, and say no. Sometimes it works after 3 or 4, sometimes 8 or 10 and usually a walk to her blanket.
Is this method going to sink in eventually?
The link Shell posted has great information about dealing with reactivity / barrier frustration, so I'll comment on this ^^^

Yes, it might sink in eventually, but it will go much faster if you teach her what you want her to do instead of trying to get on the couch. If you want her to relax on her blanket (is it on carpet? could she have a comfortable dog bed?), teach a go to mat behavior* and reward her every time she chooses to rest there. Depending on how long you've had her, it might take a while for her to truly settle in and be comfortable away from you; she might want to be near you for security.

* Here are two methods to teach this: https://clickertraining.com/node/3308 and https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U2c5EkytNU0
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thank you for the info, I will definitely explore those sources.

This is only the 3rd week she's been with us.

Last night we did some immersion therapy. Since the weather is cooling down I'm going to get back into a exercise routine -- mainly jogging and I'd like Royal to be included so we gave it a trial "run", AND the boy tagged along on his bike. She was very skeptical of the bike at first giving it a thorough sniffing. Once we were on our way she was generally ok with it but got a little jumpy when he came up close to her. Funny thing was when he sped up she REALLY wanted to keep pace with him which about killed ME trying to keep up with HER! UGH.

Anyway, the training part of it -- we passed a walker in very close proximity, she was curious, but didn't over-react. Then a family of 5, 2 young kids plus a stroller. We went out on the street to pass them. Again, she was curious, but behaved. At our half-way turn-around point there was another walker with a big dog coming up the cross street 40 or 50' away. This definitely got her attention. She turned and tried to stop and stare several times, but I just tried to keep her moving. I don't think she barked.
Then about a block later there was the tri-fecta -- Dad, small dog on a leash, and young boy on a bike. She turned and barked a couple times, but again, I just kept moving along and she seemed to accept that.
She didn't react to any cars, but these were residential streets with light, generally slow moving traffic.

Overall I thought she did really well. Hopefully a sign of her learning quickly.
 

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you don't have to do everything at once. I have a new adult male since last April, very strong independent nature. even though I have land.. I haven't let him be free willy and have everything all at once. I can't and don't control him he has to do it himself. taking the time to bond and teach skills that you have to work with, in a smaller more controlled space first before you put yourself out there in larger more uncontrolled spaces is a good practice for me. Yes we are ready to go off property but I haven't done it yet. Do feel nose work activities would be a great small space activity for exercise and mental stimulation and will provide a wonderful deep bonding between you two. lots of team work skills that are practice and a huge reward worth while for a hound.....
 
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