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Our puppy is 3.5 months old now a great pyr/yellow lab cross. Right from the start I debated getting another from her litter (I knew I wanted 2 dogs for sure) but decided to help get her settled first. We had a line on an american eskimo/pom cross last week but they seemed like a weird byb/puppy mill so I declined a dog. I knew there was another pup out there to add to our family and prayed about it. Well today I got word that we were chosen to have a great pyr/black lab female pup at the end of next month. She is only 3 weeks old right now so she needs more time with momma, and that will give us another full month of training the current puppy.

I wanted 2 puppies at the same time because I wanted to get through the puppy stage all at once and still have 2 dogs at home.

I am so excited for this little one. Our current pup is a great dog and I am hoping and anticipating the same. I am also very excited to spoil this new one as much as I do our current one.

It's funny before we got our current pup no one I knew had heard of a cross between a great pyr and a lab and now here is the second litter we are being chosen for.

In both cases they were oops pregnancies, and though I found the families in sources not seen highly one here(current pup on freecycle, new one on kijiji) I got/am getting the pups for free. Both are not breeding for money they just good homes for the pups.

Anyway, that was a really long post. I just had to share the news, I am so excited about finding the right little pup to add to our family. And that will be it for family dogs.
 

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Two pups at the same time is a HUGE task. You will need to provide a lot of individual training time to each to prevent them from having issues. "Littermate syndrome" is something to google and consider.

Two female dogs can also be an issue. Your first dog isn't old enough to know yet if she has any dog aggression issues, that can crop up at maturity also. But female-female pairings are usually not recommended unless both dogs are known to be compatible as adults. Female fights are bad news.

I wish you the best, but it is rarely a good idea to get a second puppy while your first dog is still very much a puppy.
 

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Two pups at the same time is a HUGE task. You will need to provide a lot of individual training time to each to prevent them from having issues. "Littermate syndrome" is something to google and consider.

Two female dogs can also be an issue. Your first dog isn't old enough to know yet if she has any dog aggression issues, that can crop up at maturity also. But female-female pairings are usually not recommended unless both dogs are known to be compatible as adults. Female fights are bad news.

I wish you the best, but it is rarely a good idea to get a second puppy while your first dog is still very much a puppy.
That is not something I have considered, I did not know that getting 2 females was a bad idea. I knew there was going to be considerable work involved which is why I was looking at doing it now while myself and all 4 of my kids were still home fulltime. My teens are a great help when it comes to the pup, with training sessions, walks, playtime etc. Between the 3 of us the current pup gets tons and I figured now is the time I have to devote to major training etc. Especially with summer break starting shortly.

Dog aggression. Is that something that crops up even in dogs that are around other dogs from a young age? She has been fine with every dog that has ever been around her, but as you said she is still young. So it can still crop up?

I know the family does have males available too. I had thought having 2 females would be better, but obviously I was wrong on that. Off to google litter mate syndrome.

I don't want to cause distress or problems for any of the dogs. I am just was hoping that I could put the effort in now with 2 rather than spend 2 years raising 1 to adulthood and then starting over with another at the same time that my teens are starting high school and not as available to help with training/walks etc.

Off to google more and make sure it is the right decision.
 

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That is not something I have considered, I did not know that getting 2 females was a bad idea. I knew there was going to be considerable work involved which is why I was looking at doing it now while myself and all 4 of my kids were still home fulltime. My teens are a great help when it comes to the pup, with training sessions, walks, playtime etc. Between the 3 of us the current pup gets tons and I figured now is the time I have to devote to major training etc. Especially with summer break starting shortly.

Dog aggression. Is that something that crops up even in dogs that are around other dogs from a young age? She has been fine with every dog that has ever been around her, but as you said she is still young. So it can still crop up?

In breeds that are prone to dog aggression, it can often crop up around the age of 1.5-2 years or basically maturity Socialization is important for any dog and will help prevent fear aggression or simply being a brat. Labs are not really prone to dog aggression to my knowledge, but Great Pyrs are guard dogs and while a well-bred Great Pyr should not be aggressive, a poorly bred Great Pyr can be over territorial or over protective. The potential does exist and you have to consider it at least

I know the family does have males available too. I had thought having 2 females would be better, but obviously I was wrong on that. Off to google litter mate syndrome.

typically mixed-sex pairings do better between dogs. While males might fight, it seems that females get into it worse and are less likely to "get over it" or "settle things" between them

I don't want to cause distress or problems for any of the dogs. I am just was hoping that I could put the effort in now with 2 rather than spend 2 years raising 1 to adulthood and then starting over with another at the same time that my teens are starting high school and not as available to help with training/walks etc.
It isn't really 2 years to raise them to adult hood, yes, a dog isn't fully an adult until about then, but the vast majority of "puppy hood" is over by about 10 months or so. Having a trained adult dog makes training the second dog easier, as while the first dog doesn't exactly "teach" the second, she can be a solid example on walks and of general behavior (for example, many a young dog will follow the lead of a calm adult dog in situations that might scare a pup like loud noises, strange sights, barking dogs etc)

Off to google more and make sure it is the right decision.
I put a few comments in bold. There is definitely much to consider and while it might be the right choice and timing for you, it is a BIG step to be taken cautiously.

also....if you do get a dog from an "oops" litter, consider offering to pay for the mother dog to be spayed (paying directly to the vet office). If the owner of the mom dog won't take you up on that offer, it really raises a red flag that it isn't truly an "oops" litter....
 

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I put a few comments in bold. There is definitely much to consider and while it might be the right choice and timing for you, it is a BIG step to be taken cautiously.

also....if you do get a dog from an "oops" litter, consider offering to pay for the mother dog to be spayed (paying directly to the vet office). If the owner of the mom dog won't take you up on that offer, it really raises a red flag that it isn't truly an "oops" litter....
Thank you for that information about the benefit of an adult dog with a new pup. I will take it into consideration for sure. That is a great idea about paying to have the momma spayed. With the first one I did ask about it and they had an appt to take her in as soon as the pups were gone. I have spoken to the people we got her from since then and they have said she has been since spayed but I have not checked for proof. I will offer it to these people if I accept one of their pups.

My biggest worry about mixed sex pairings was accidental breeding. I have plans to get Delilah spayed this summer when she is 7-8 months old. With her that young and if I was to get a boy for the next one they would both still be too young for any oops right? If we got a boy, would he be too young to get fixed at the same time, he would be 2 months younger than her, so 5-6 months when he got fixed if at the same time, or I could put it off for a few more months.
 

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Dogs are easier to prevent accidental pregnancies with than cats are (if you have a mixed-gender cat pair, you'd better have her spayed before 4 months!). If she goes into heat or he starts showing interest (indicating she might be going into heat soon), you keep them separated. Not too hard. But a large-breed female shouldn't go into heat before 9 months. For a large-breed male, I'd wait until he was at least a year old to neuter him. Unless you're having trouble keeping him contained; then it would have to be done ASAP to prevent a paternity suit ;).

I agree on not getting 2 females. Even in breeds that aren't known for being DA, females can really get into it. Think of girls in high school. . .they fight, they snip, they spread rumors, and never forgive each other. Guys might get into a fight and then get over it--male dogs can be the same way. But once girls fight it can be a real problem for them to get over it.
 

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Dogs are easier to prevent accidental pregnancies with than cats are (if you have a mixed-gender cat pair, you'd better have her spayed before 4 months!). If she goes into heat or he starts showing interest (indicating she might be going into heat soon), you keep them separated. Not too hard. But a large-breed female shouldn't go into heat before 9 months. For a large-breed male, I'd wait until he was at least a year old to neuter him. Unless you're having trouble keeping him contained; then it would have to be done ASAP to prevent a paternity suit ;).

I agree on not getting 2 females. Even in breeds that aren't known for being DA, females can really get into it. Think of girls in high school. . .
Yeah I have had mixed pairings of cats in the past and the male got the female pregnant at 4 months old before I could get them in. I felt sick for a very long time over it. That is good to know about large breed dogs and when to fix them. I think it would be no problem to keep him contained, and as long as she is spayed that won't be an issue, so he can wait until 1 year.

I have spoken to the family that has the pups and let them know I am considering a male now instead of a female and they agreed it was a better choice when I explained why.
 

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I agree on not getting 2 females. Even in breeds that aren't known for being DA, females can really get into it. Think of girls in high school. . .they fight, they snip, they spread rumors, and never forgive each other. Guys might get into a fight and then get over it--male dogs can be the same way. But once girls fight it can be a real problem for them to get over it.
I have 3 females aged 7.5, 7 and 1 and also a 9 year old male. The three girls all tolerate each other for the most part. My 7 year old Husky/Shep also plays a lot with my 1 year old GSD. But it's true, it can be very much like high school. My oldest female will hold a grudge and she won't play with the other two girls, only my 9 year old male.
It's an interesting dynamic for sure.
 

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I have two females and we have never had any problems. Mine are best buds and play great together. I think Zoey was 7 or 8 months old when we brought in Ziva and Ziva was 3 months when we got her. Lots of people. Thought we were bonkers bought it worked out just great for us.
good luck!
 

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I would also vote to wait. Wait till your current pup is old enough, around 14 months at least, ideally 2 years old. In the meantime take classes with this pup, send the kids, learn a LOT and let her be an only dog. Then you have a better chance with the second pup to make less mistakes and spend more one on one time with that one bonding. My golden's breeder will NOT place a pup in a home with a dog under the age of 2. It's in her contract also that if you get a dog before the dog she placed you is 2, then any temperament issues aren't her problem.

What happens is the two dogs bond to each other more than the humans, who often get too busy and just do the basics, then all of a sudden they don't care where the humans are or what they want, or at least not as much as they care about each other. For some people this is great, but when it comes time for one dog to go to the vet or if anything happens, the other dog is very stressed out. Or worse, the two hit the 'teens' at the same time and it's all out war and again you don't have as much control or the same bond. It's not just twice the work, it's more like triple the work or more to make sure both dogs have enough training and attention as youngsters. A running joke here is the people who would be able to take in two pups at a time and do it 'right' never do because they know better!

Even reading on this forum you will find lots of examples of 'littermate syndrome'. For every person that it's worked for there's usually ten that say it wasn't a great idea for one reason or another.
 

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While males might fight, it seems that females get into it worse and are less likely to "get over it" or "settle things" between them
Hmmm, now what other species is this so very common in... lemme think. ;D
 

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Hmmm, now what other species is this so very common in... lemme think. ;D
LOL. Probably all species. It's most likely some kind of adaptation to protect the babies. . .or something like that.
 

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I'd really recommend against the second puppy until the first dog is an adult and spayed (to remove all possibility of joining the "oops" litter crowd.) Dog aggression absolutely can happen in socialized puppies. Most of a dog's temperament is genetic. Socialization is necessary and can help a lot of things, but if the dog has the genetics to be dog aggressive, you could find yourself stuck in a crate and rotate situation for the next decade or so. (Or having to rehome one of the dogs.)

Plus, it's way easier to raise a puppy with a well trained adult dog showing him the ropes as opposed to another puppy causing trouble. Two puppies together are likely to incite each other to make trouble and are very likely to bond to each other and stop caring much about people at all. This will be difficult to prevent.

I'd wait a year or two. Unfortunately, there are oops litters every year. There will be another puppy when you're ready.
 
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