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I assume you signed a contract with your breeder...Hopefully it has a clause that if you can’t keep the dog, they get the dog back.
 

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I assume you signed a contract with your breeder...Hopefully it has a clause that if you can’t keep the dog, they get the dog back.
He wasn't a professional breeder, the only thing I have is a typed and signed contract that say's he'll take him back if there's a health problem in the first year...Nothing typed about if the dog just didn't work out..I already asked if he would buy him back at half price and he said no. I have thought about since he now bit my kids a few times seeing if he'll agree but...I don't know.
 

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Ah....you didn‘t get your puppy from a very good breeder. Should you decide to buy from a breeder again, we can help you find a reputable breeder. I’m afraid that you’re going to be out what you paid. Wherever you place your pup, you must disclose the bite. I believe it’s a puppy nip but still needs to be disclosed.

I know this is hard but if you want to keep the pup, search for one using apdt.com.

if none in your area, contact the nearest and see if they know someone. Good luck!
 

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Thanks for your response. I want to clear up that my dog wasn't sleeping at the time this happened, he was laying down chewing on a bone. My daughter was in the wrong for trying to pet him? Do you have kids?
Well ..... approaching a dog eating a bone is a bigger no, no, unless they've been trained to not react .... which takes some time if ever, and then, only by an adult and only in exceptional circumstances. Sorry .... not the pup's fault and especially at only 5 months old. We have been a dog family (GSD's) all our married life and whilst our children were babies, toddlers etc. THEY were strictly taught to NEVER approach them when they were eating, resting or sleeping. As a result, my children were never even growled at.
 

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Well ..... approaching a dog eating a bone is a bigger no, no, unless they've been trained to not react .... which takes some time if ever, and then, only by an adult and only in exceptional circumstances. Sorry .... not the pup's fault and especially at only 5 months old. We have been a dog family (GSD's) all our married life and whilst our children were babies, toddlers etc. THEY were strictly taught to NEVER approach them when they were eating, resting or sleeping. As a result, my children were never even growled at.
So yes, your daughter WAS in the wrong.
 

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If you do decide to give this puppy up, DO NOT put it in a shelter. It will end up with even worse people than you. Clearly both the dog and your kids need some training. I live with 3 younger siiblings and they know MUCH better to mess with Zeus when he has food. I trained my dog to where he is able to handle these situtions like this. Regardless the kids are strongly discouraged from approching when either dogs are eating, sleeping, or playing with toys. this was both yours, and your childs fault. Send it back to its breeder or find a breed specific rescue who knows how to handle thais.
 

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The OP has stated several times that the breeder will not take the dog back. Please read the entire thread before you respond.
 

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If I were the seller in this case, I'd give you half of your money back. Reluctantly, but only to ensure I got the dog back and it didn't end up elsewhere. But that's just me, and I'm just sayin'. I wouldn't expect this so-called breeder to do the same.

My advice for any plans of another dog in the future? Think and choose carefully. Your past and present dogs seem to be in the category of "macho type", and moving forward I would only consider a breed that is much more family / child friendly and less capable of doing severe damage, heaven forbid. My suggestion would be, something more along the lines of a Cavalier King Charles Spaniel, or Pug, or other breed that has less damage potential, and little or no need for expert / experienced training. Yeah, they're not very macho. But they're practical, gentle, relatively tolerant, and well-suited for a domestic environment which includes children. And most definitely, above all, please learn to embrace a solely positive approach to training / molding your pup into something you can trust 99%, so-to-speak. Seek out knowledge on this, and both peace of mind and safety will be close behind.

You have a family now. They should be your focus and your priority now. Time to drop the macho expectations, forceful mindset, and useless training techniques that only create trouble.
 

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We had Rotties when my kids were born. My kids were trained on how to behave around dogs. In this instance your daughter was 100% in the wrong. She should know by now not to bother dogs who are eating, and especially steer clear when they have a bone. Common sense 101.
 

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Most of these answers are wrong. You just bought the wrong dog. I have never owned a dog that I had to be on tip toes around in fear of it biting me. Find a dog that you can play with really hard and it won't bear it's teeth at you because you touched it wrong.
 

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I had kids.

My opinion is that you are probably not going to be able to provide the home that this dog needs because you are hard wired to protect your own offspring. The dog didn't do anything wrong and is not at fault, but you are not going to be able to forget that your child was injured. Humans aren't machines and we all have feelings.

My parents were dog people before they were parents and did not rehome their German Shepherd when the same thing happened to them. I have very clear memories of them cleaning my older sibling's wounds and explaining why the dog was not punished for being a dog. I would have been a very young toddler at the time. My sibling grew up to love dogs and won many Highest Scoring Junior Handler awards. I grew up knowing never to take a bone away from a dog and can't remember any incidents where the Shepherd bit me or behaved aggressively towards me.

If you had asked your question on a parenting forum, you would have gotten the same answers in more sympathetic language. I applaud you for understanding where we are coming from and also for trying to find the right home for the puppy instead of dumping him on an overwhelmed shelter like a piece of garbage.

I'm not familiar with the breed, but these rescue organizations are:


Because he is a rare breed and because he is worth money, he has a much better chance of finding a good home than a mutt or a Golden would. I'm not going to recommend a that you stick to a stuffed animal or a pet rock, but I am going to recommend sequencing.

My dog is just like the daughter I never had. When I was raising my sons, my cats were expensive nuisances (as well as guilty pleasures) and it really annoyed me that dogs existed.

Someday that beautiful little girl of yours is going to grow up and you will be lonely and think that your life is over. I hope the right dog finds you then. Sometimes life has chapters.

Best of luck to you and your family. Perhaps somebody can foster the dog while you are looking for his perfect new family. You can explain it to your little girl in a way that she learns how to keep herself safe in the future.
 
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