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Discussion Starter #1
Hello everybody:
This forum is great. I read many threads and learned a lot. I am going to buy/adopt a new dog. I have some experience with small and medium size dogs and owned two medium size dogs.
Now about the new dog. I live alone in a one-bedroom flat I work around 8 hours a day and at home I have to study for at least 2 hours so I don't have a lot of time but I love to walk my dog and dog parks are the place I have the best time of my life! I know with my limited time terriers, sheep dogs, hunting dogs and waking dogs are not my options. I know that any high maintenance working dog will get board and won't do good with 8 hours in a crate. The only remained group for me is sighthound group. At first I was thinking of adopting a retired racing greyhound but after researching more I realized there are two very interesting dog breeds which I love to have but I am not sure they have the same characteristics as greyhounds. These two are Ibizan Hound and pharaoh hound. What do think guys? Do you have any experience with these breeds? Are they as calm and tolerant as greyhounds? I know that greyhounds generally do very good with long crate hours and as long as I give them enough room to walk and run (on-leash and not off-leash) they do fine. What about Ibizan hounds and pharaoh hounds? Are they low barking dogs as greyhounds and Borzois?
Another suggestion I received was buying a Chow Chow. A Chow Chow breeder told me that they are low maintenance and very easy going and don't get board or destructive when left home alone. I know some lines of Chow Chow are aggressive and I really prefer not to have an aggressive dog left alone at home but I am in no hurry and can study all the possible breeders and buy from a reputable breeder but I have some doubts about Chow Chows in general. Are they calm dogs at home? Do they bark a lot? Do they tolerate staying home for a long time? I know they were bred as working dogs but I heard they are very calm generally. On the other hand Chow Chow is a good guard dog and I really like it if the dog can protect my home when I am at work and I know that sighthounds rather welcome a burglar.
Please help me choose. I know you may say that a cat (I know not a Siamese if I want some peace at home!)is a better option but I really love to have a dog.
Thanks in advance.
 

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Ibizan Hound and Pharaoh hound need a TON TON TON of exercise and stimulation, and I believe have some issues with separation anxiety. Here's a good past thread about them http://www.dogforums.com/general-dog-forum/80414-temptation-what-do.html

I think you'd be way over your head with an Ibizan or Pharaoh hound. I do not know much about Chows, other than you HAVE to socialize the heck out of them. There is a member on here by the name of grab that has two Chows (one is the cutest little puppy), I would recommend talking to them.
 

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Hi Hoolines,

Sorry I say neither. Dogs do not come with warranty. Despite of breed specific characteristics, anything can happen. I tend to take things rather seriously esp. for cats and dogs though. I will go for chartreux (sorry again-a cat breed). You won't regret it.
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
Ibizan Hound and Pharaoh hound need a TON TON TON of exercise and stimulation, and I believe have some issues with separation anxiety. Here's a good past thread about them http://www.dogforums.com/general-dog-forum/80414-temptation-what-do.html

I think you'd be way over your head with an Ibizan or Pharaoh hound. I do not know much about Chows, other than you HAVE to socialize the heck out of them. There is a member on here by the name of grab that has two Chows (one is the cutest little puppy), I would recommend talking to them.
Thanks for the answer. I contacted Grab. Thanks again.

Hi Hoolines,

Sorry I say neither. Dogs do not come with warranty. Despite of breed specific characteristics, anything can happen. I tend to take things rather seriously esp. for cats and dogs though. I will go for chartreux (sorry again-a cat breed). You won't regret it.
Thanks. They are great cats. Maine Coon are great too. I really hope that I can get a dog but those cats are great too.
Thanks
 

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A chow chow sounds like a very bad idea for you.

But a greyhound sounds like it has potential. What turned you away from greyhounds to those other sighthounds? There are many retired racing greyhounds in need of homes and the ones I have met have been super. And as for the home protection aspect; any large dog is going to be a deterrent and a dog that will actually "guard" (attack rather than alert) is a big liability anyway.

I am gone 9 hours per day and with a good morning walk and a long evening walk or run, my hound is quite content and non-destructive. I do make sure to devote plenty of weekend time to him with hiking and off-leash time at the horse farm. My "tv/internet/lazy" time is probably equal to your daily study time and Chester likes curling up on the couch or sitting on the porch with me (if your flat has outdoor area even if not fenced that's a plus, many dogs enjoy just being outside)
 

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Consider a Greyhound. They're actually good apartment dogs. No to the Chow. Especially if you'd like to go to a dog park. They can be aggressive. They also have high maintainence grooming requirements. Plus, since you are limited on time, I'm not sure you could socialize one properly.
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
A chow chow sounds like a very bad idea for you.

But a greyhound sounds like it has potential. What turned you away from greyhounds to those other sighthounds? There are many retired racing greyhounds in need of homes and the ones I have met have been super. And as for the home protection aspect; any large dog is going to be a deterrent and a dog that will actually "guard" (attack rather than alert) is a big liability anyway.

I am gone 9 hours per day and with a good morning walk and a long evening walk or run, my hound is quite content and non-destructive. I do make sure to devote plenty of weekend time to him with hiking and off-leash time at the horse farm. My "tv/internet/lazy" time is probably equal to your daily study time and Chester likes curling up on the couch or sitting on the porch with me (if your flat has outdoor area even if not fenced that's a plus, many dogs enjoy just being outside)
WOW! thanks for the advice. What's your hound? From the photo looks to be a rhodesian ridgeback! Isn't it?
That's great about greyhounds. I was not sure a greyhound is a better choise or a whippet. The plus of greyhound is that I can adopt a retired racing one which means adult and calm. On the other hand whippets are smaller and easier to handle (as much as I heard). I really like to hear more about your experience about hounds.

Okay. No CHOW! Will consider a greyhound or a whippet. thanks
 

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Retired racers are incredible dogs. I've met about 7, and they were all great. It's amazing watching them run!! If you want a big dog, get a greyhound. They are a lot bigger than I ever imagined, especially the males. The best thing is that, in most cases, you can choose a greyhound that fits your needs and likes to a T.

Whippets are also super awesome dogs. I've seen a few off leash at the ravine I take one of my dogs to, and while I personally wouldn't risk it with a sighthound, the ones I've met are very biddable. They are real athletes, and one owner I talked to said that of the greyhounds and whippets she has owned, the whippets were much more active than her greys ever were. There is one guy at the dog park that bring his two whippets and he tosses a frisbee for them and not only can they easily out run the disc, they have super springs on their feet!! Very fun to watch.

The only things I would worry about when taking a greyhound or whippet to a dog park is the height of the fencing (greys and whippets can jump VERY high), the level of prey drive in the dog (don't want your grey/whippet going after the little fluffy dog zooming around like a tasty rabbit), and if the dogs that frequent the park are rough players. Greys and whippets tend to have very thin skin and a rough, playful dog could accidentally cause quite a bit of damage.
 

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I looked in to a whippet myself, but it was surprisingly difficult to find any (breeder OR rescue). Greyhounds might be easier to find and there are so many great ones waiting for homes. Plus they are such gorgeous giants.
 

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WOW! thanks for the advice. What's your hound? From the photo looks to be a rhodesian ridgeback! Isn't it?
That's great about greyhounds. I was not sure a greyhound is a better choise or a whippet. The plus of greyhound is that I can adopt a retired racing one which means adult and calm. On the other hand whippets are smaller and easier to handle (as much as I heard). I really like to hear more about your experience about hounds.

Okay. No CHOW! Will consider a greyhound or a whippet. thanks
Poorly breed Ridgeback or ridgeback mix; he was a rescue. Perfect dog in my bias opinion :)
I wouldn't say a whippet is easier to handle, aside from maybe the ability to physically pick up the dog for bathing him or maybe loading into a car. Like Locke says, they have amazing energy, I think a friend of mine's dog is a whippet mix (shelter dog) and she can wear out my dog playing and almost keep up with him at a dead run (his size lets him win there).

Some greyhounds will be fine at a dog park, others would only be okay on-leash but you can still give them a good workout (try a 50 ft leash in an uncrowded park or vacant land area) or take up jogging. My dog could be considered a sighthound and he has major prey drive towards rabbits, squirrels, and such but is fine with small dogs (although a little rough in play, they do not excite his prey drive).
 

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Poorly breed Ridgeback or ridgeback mix; he was a rescue. Perfect dog in my bias opinion :)
I wouldn't say a whippet is easier to handle, aside from maybe the ability to physically pick up the dog for bathing him or maybe loading into a car. Like Locke says, they have amazing energy, I think a friend of mine's dog is a whippet mix (shelter dog) and she can wear out my dog playing and almost keep up with him at a dead run (his size lets him win there).

Some greyhounds will be fine at a dog park, others would only be okay on-leash but you can still give them a good workout (try a 50 ft leash in an uncrowded park or vacant land area) or take up jogging. My dog could be considered a sighthound and he has major prey drive towards rabbits, squirrels, and such but is fine with small dogs (although a little rough in play, they do not excite his prey drive).
Your dog looks great. I love ridgebackes especially if they don't have the ridge (after I watched that documentary about pedigree dogs and their health issues.) Anyway he looks to be a great dog. About whippets, yes their size is ideal for me as they are easier to handle and I can pick him up for bathing for example but greys are big big dogs. I will get a long leash (the longest I can find). Thanks for the reply.
 

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I think you will find to that if you join some greyhound groups they have a set time at some dog parks just for greyhound so there are no small and fluffies to chase.
 

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I think you will find to that if you join some greyhound groups they have a set time at some dog parks just for greyhound so there are no small and fluffies to chase.
That's great


A funny thing... when I search for a perfect breed for my condition dogbreeinfo returns most of terriers! and Corgies! Pembroke Welsh Corgi are high mainetance dogs, aren't they? I saw just one but gerenally I heard due to their high inteligence, they need constant mental stimulation. Isn't it true?
 

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I can only answer about Chows, as I don't have sighthounds :) We are on our third Chow. For us, they're the perfect breed. But, like any breed, they aren't for everyone. We do socialize our dogs, but just as much as I would any puppy. I've only dealt with responsible breeders who have temperament as a focus, so I've never had one of my dogs show human aggression. That does not mean every breeder makes that a focus, so one has to do their research. My male loves everyone and has ever let people reach over the fence to pet him while my back was turned. He can put up a good show when someone rings the doorbell (they get a large lionlike head peeking out of the window, barking) but that's about it :)

My dogs are, in general, laid back. I'm told that smooth coats are generally more active. Goose is a puppy, though, so we'll see how that pans out as she grows. Laid back doesn't mean no exercise, mind you. But they're content with a walk, rather than 3 hours of exercise.

I wouldn't leave any dog in a crate for 8 hours though. Goose is crated, but I come home on my lunch hour and take her out/let her zoom around, etc.
 

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While there is still a chance one would be a chewer, it is pretty likely that a retired racing greyhound would be able to be left alone in the house, possibly in just your living room with the rest of the apartment blocked by a baby-gate. 8 hours is a long time in a crate, but many dogs are fine with that and if they are destructive alone, it is safer for them than chewing on cords and swallowing god knows what. A puppy however, you would probably have a lot of trouble potty-training with your work schedule and a puppy definitely cannot be left alone in a crate for 8 hours.

I wouldn't worry about a large dog being physically more difficult to handle, especially with training. Only differences I notice compared to my friends with small dogs is how much food mine eats and that people are more likely to stay back from us or step away on the sidewalk (total plus in my opinion). And I can put a backpack on mine and make him carry his own water etc on hikes.

Oh, and by the way; on here when we say things like "poorly bred" that only means not bred to standard or not bred properly with attention to health/genetics; many great dogs are "poorly bred" just like "mutt" isn't a bad thing here either, it just describes a mixed bred. Thanks for the compliments on my dog though, I'll make sure to tell him :)
 

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Discussion Starter #16 (Edited)
I can only answer about Chows, as I don't have sighthounds :) We are on our third Chow. For us, they're the perfect breed. But, like any breed, they aren't for everyone. We do socialize our dogs, but just as much as I would any puppy. I've only dealt with responsible breeders who have temperament as a focus, so I've never had one of my dogs show human aggression. That does not mean every breeder makes that a focus, so one has to do their research. My male loves everyone and has ever let people reach over the fence to pet him while my back was turned. He can put up a good show when someone rings the doorbell (they get a large lionlike head peeking out of the window, barking) but that's about it :)

My dogs are, in general, laid back. I'm told that smooth coats are generally more active. Goose is a puppy, though, so we'll see how that pans out as she grows. Laid back doesn't mean no exercise, mind you. But they're content with a walk, rather than 3 hours of exercise.

I wouldn't leave any dog in a crate for 8 hours though. Goose is crated, but I come home on my lunch hour and take her out/let her zoom around, etc.
Thanks for the reply. That's great. You are right. I really can't return home for lunch and it seems it's not a good idea to but a Chow but I will one day and then I will ask for your help. Thanks again

While there is still a chance one would be a chewer, it is pretty likely that a retired racing greyhound would be able to be left alone in the house, possibly in just your living room with the rest of the apartment blocked by a baby-gate. 8 hours is a long time in a crate, but many dogs are fine with that and if they are destructive alone, it is safer for them than chewing on cords and swallowing god knows what. A puppy however, you would probably have a lot of trouble potty-training with your work schedule and a puppy definitely cannot be left alone in a crate for 8 hours.

I wouldn't worry about a large dog being physically more difficult to handle, especially with training. Only differences I notice compared to my friends with small dogs is how much food mine eats and that people are more likely to stay back from us or step away on the sidewalk (total plus in my opinion). And I can put a backpack on mine and make him carry his own water etc on hikes.

Oh, and by the way; on here when we say things like "poorly bred" that only means not bred to standard or not bred properly with attention to health/genetics; many great dogs are "poorly bred" just like "mutt" isn't a bad thing here either, it just describes a mixed bred. Thanks for the compliments on my dog though, I'll make sure to tell him :)
Will do my best with an adult greyhound. Great help. Thanks.
 

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WOW! thanks for the advice. What's your hound? From the photo looks to be a rhodesian ridgeback! Isn't it?
That's great about greyhounds. I was not sure a greyhound is a better choise or a whippet. The plus of greyhound is that I can adopt a retired racing one which means adult and calm. On the other hand whippets are smaller and easier to handle (as much as I heard). I really like to hear more about your experience about hounds.

Okay. No CHOW! Will consider a greyhound or a whippet. thanks
I've only met two whippets, and they're super sweet. I've met handfuls of retired racing greyhounds and they are WONDERFUL. My Petco (in BG) occasionally has a "Meet the Greyhounds" day where the greyhound rescue brings some of their dogs out for the public to meet, and hopefully get adopted. It's usually advertised in the pet section a week or so in advance. We board several RRG's. Very sweet tempered dogs, quiet, clean. They don't do so hot in cold weather (no pun intended, hehe), so most people who live where there's snow invest in a coat or jacket (they aren't all frou frou. There are some really neat, horse-style blanket coat things out there for dogs).
I don't have much experience with chows, mainly because my mom refuses to groom them and refuses them in the shop all together. (There's a chow breeder located about 1/2 mile down the road, and she's a groomer and kennel operater herself so we send them there). Back when I was a kid, I worked in a kennel that boarded chows. One owner had two. One was nasty as sin and had no reservations biting his owner. His other dog was as sweet as sugar and never hurt a fly in her life. I've been told by chow people that they're not fuzzy golden retrievers or labs, they're a different breed all in their own and most reputable chow breeders that I know won't sell to people who don't have experience owning dogs who "aren't Lassie", kwim?
Greyhounds IME are somewhat velcro dogs, they love to be with you and love to adore you. From what I've heard, a chow shows affection by meditating at your feet.
(Please keep in mind I have little experience with chows, so any chow people out there feel free to correct me if I'm wrong!)

I can only answer about Chows, as I don't have sighthounds :) We are on our third Chow. For us, they're the perfect breed. But, like any breed, they aren't for everyone. We do socialize our dogs, but just as much as I would any puppy. I've only dealt with responsible breeders who have temperament as a focus, so I've never had one of my dogs show human aggression. That does not mean every breeder makes that a focus, so one has to do their research. My male loves everyone and has ever let people reach over the fence to pet him while my back was turned. He can put up a good show when someone rings the doorbell (they get a large lionlike head peeking out of the window, barking) but that's about it :)

My dogs are, in general, laid back. I'm told that smooth coats are generally more active. Goose is a puppy, though, so we'll see how that pans out as she grows. Laid back doesn't mean no exercise, mind you. But they're content with a walk, rather than 3 hours of exercise.

I wouldn't leave any dog in a crate for 8 hours though. Goose is crated, but I come home on my lunch hour and take her out/let her zoom around, etc.
I'll never forget the first time Auz (the GSD) pulled his Grizzly bear act. Someone was at the door, he raced around the house, into the back portion of the door where we had a hot tub (cover on). He dove onto the cover, peered out the window (about 5 feet up) and roared at the people. He looked like he was about 15 feet tall! (He's really not so tough, but don't tell him that).
Your chows sound fantastic. The chows I mentioned in my post had the same owner, so I'm assuming they came from different breeders as the male had a bad temperament and the female was as sweet as can be. A friend of mine had chows for years, she said they were absolutely wonderful!
 

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I've only met two whippets, and they're super sweet. I've met handfuls of retired racing greyhounds and they are WONDERFUL. My Petco (in BG) occasionally has a "Meet the Greyhounds" day where the greyhound rescue brings some of their dogs out for the public to meet, and hopefully get adopted. It's usually advertised in the pet section a week or so in advance. We board several RRG's. Very sweet tempered dogs, quiet, clean. They don't do so hot in cold weather (no pun intended, hehe), so most people who live where there's snow invest in a coat or jacket (they aren't all frou frou. There are some really neat, horse-style blanket coat things out there for dogs).
I don't have much experience with chows, mainly because my mom refuses to groom them and refuses them in the shop all together. (There's a chow breeder located about 1/2 mile down the road, and she's a groomer and kennel operater herself so we send them there). Back when I was a kid, I worked in a kennel that boarded chows. One owner had two. One was nasty as sin and had no reservations biting his owner. His other dog was as sweet as sugar and never hurt a fly in her life. I've been told by chow people that they're not fuzzy golden retrievers or labs, they're a different breed all in their own and most reputable chow breeders that I know won't sell to people who don't have experience owning dogs who "aren't Lassie", kwim?
Greyhounds IME are somewhat velcro dogs, they love to be with you and love to adore you. From what I've heard, a chow shows affection by meditating at your feet.
(Please keep in mind I have little experience with chows, so any chow people out there feel free to correct me if I'm wrong!)



I'll never forget the first time Auz (the GSD) pulled his Grizzly bear act. Someone was at the door, he raced around the house, into the back portion of the door where we had a hot tub (cover on). He dove onto the cover, peered out the window (about 5 feet up) and roared at the people. He looked like he was about 15 feet tall! (He's really not so tough, but don't tell him that).
Your chows sound fantastic. The chows I mentioned in my post had the same owner, so I'm assuming they came from different breeders as the male had a bad temperament and the female was as sweet as can be. A friend of mine had chows for years, she said they were absolutely wonderful!
Wow. That performance is what I love to watch! I love GSDs and generally all herding dogs. They are more than awesome. I wish I had enough time to buy a GSD or a belgian sheepdog or even an Australian sheepdog, the red ones are what I really love. Thanks for the reply and for telling that story about your GSD.
 

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Sighthounds are great dogs. To answer about retired racers, with sighthounds in the house, basically they are a 35mph couch pototo. They do however need daily exercise. However- the Greys are noted as 'the seniors dog' meaning that simple exercise daily, gentle and docile by nature, and of course- naturally quiet. Same can be said for most of the sighthounds.
Healthwise the sighthounds have few genetic problems with them and ( except for the Irish) have a long life span in comparision with the most giant breeds. Rarely chewers and easy to housebreak. a sighthound after knowing the rules of the house, will not need a crate really and will prefer your couch or other soft bedding.
 

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Sighthounds are great dogs. To answer about retired racers, with sighthounds in the house, basically they are a 35mph couch pototo. They do however need daily exercise. However- the Greys are noted as 'the seniors dog' meaning that simple exercise daily, gentle and docile by nature, and of course- naturally quiet. Same can be said for most of the sighthounds.
Healthwise the sighthounds have few genetic problems with them and ( except for the Irish) have a long life span in comparision with the most giant breeds. Rarely chewers and easy to housebreak. a sighthound after knowing the rules of the house, will not need a crate really and will prefer your couch or other soft bedding.
Thanks for the answer. You own a Borzi (obviously!) and I love those great looking/temperament dogs. Did you adopt him as an adult or got him as a puppy? Are they as docile as Greyhounds? I am ready to take my dog to any beauty saloon if needed for grooming but the only problem I have is 8-10hrs or work time. I love to know your firsthand opinion.
 
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