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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Our pomeranian is three months old. Her hair is starting to get long and funky. I read where they are about four months old they will start to get kind of shaggy because of their new hair coming and (loosing their baby hair?) or what actually happens? I am so tempted to trim her hair now. She looks funky.
 

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Why would you want to trim her? While poms are trimmed up for show, they're not a clipped breed, typically, and just regular brushing should keep her neat.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I was just wondering about how the baby hair leaves and the adult hair comes in. Will she shed or is it now that her hair looks funky. I don't care for the look of some of the ways people have the poms hair cut but that isn't something I am concerned about right now. She is definitely not going to be a show dog - just a love pet. LOL
 

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Our Pom definitely had a gangly, shaggy look when he was a pup. Don't worry, it will pass and the coat should get more full with age. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Is their hair a different feel than the puppy fuzzy look? I should have touched their parents but did not think of it at the time.
 

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Your pup's hair is looking funky because she is going through a coat change. The puppy coat that is ready to shed is falling out and the adult coat is growing in. The puppy coat and adult coat are different. I would definitely suggest waiting it out. Clipping double coated breeds may lead to clipper alopecia. It's also possible that if you clip your pup (or clip her as an adult dog) and she has or ends up with diabetes, cushings, etc. that her hair will grow in even funkier than it is now for the rest of her life.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Clipping double coated breeds may lead to clipper alopecia. It's also possible that if you clip your pup (or clip her as an adult dog) and she has or ends up with diabetes, cushings, etc. that her hair will grow in even funkier than it is now for the rest of her life.



What is clipper alopecia? Why would she get diabetes or whatever cushings is from getting her hair cut?

I'm not really going to clip her hair but it sure is tempting. Has anyone here not taken their dog to a place to get their hair done and just done it themselves?
 

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Your don't won't get diabetes or cushings from being clipped. That is not what I said. I said that if your dog has or gets either condition or some others, the haircoat can be effected. Clipping just makes it look that much worse. Clipper alopecia is when the growth of the hair is effected after clipping in an otherwise healthy dog. I am a professional groomer and have seen this all many times over with double coated breeds. I have also seen double coated dogs who have been clipped their entire lives and who have grown their hair back in just fine every time. (Sometimes normal regrowth takes a year or more after the clipping stops.) The question for you as an owner is if you want to take that gamble...
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Oh my gosh. That poor dog. Of course it probably doesn't know anything was wrong with it's hair but gad, poor dog. I am just looking at trimming sometime down the road.
 

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The dog had it's coat shaved a few months prior. Prior to being shaved the coat was normal. According to the groomer and owner, the dog does not have diabetes, cushings, thyroid problems, etc., so if that is true this is an example of clipper alopecia. Dogs who are clipped who have or develop diabetes, cushings, thyroid problem, etc. often come out looking the same way as the coat tries to grow back in.
 

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Ooh, yikes, that's one bad hair style!
I had decided a while back that if I ever adopted a dog with a double-coat I would shave them, so I wouldn't have to deal with the super long hair (purely for my convenience). I hadn't known that the coat could end up looking like that though. Does Clipper alopecia happen often on shaved dogs?
 

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It depends - and it doesn't necessarily have to be a long-haired dog- any double-coat will do. I've seen it on corgis, goldens, and a GSD!
 

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I'm not really going to clip her hair but it sure is tempting. Has anyone here not taken their dog to a place to get their hair done and just done it themselves?
With a Pomeranian, if you aren't experienced in grooming I would say a visit to the groomer every 6 weeks or so is just about mandatory. With Shadow (our Pom) if he did not get groomed regularly his coat got really bad and he was miserable because of it. It especially clumped by his rear which lead to messy, smelly problems. :eek:

We would still brush Shadow ourselves between grooming, but it just wasn't the same as having the groomer do it.

The groomer never clipped/shaved him. She might have trimmed a few hairs but mostly it was just a very thorough, professional brushing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Gad, that poor dog. I am definitely not shaving her. I was just wondering about trimming like I do my other dog. I'd rather try to do it myself. I have never gone to a dog groomer. They are expensive.
 

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Ooh, yikes, that's one bad hair style!
I had decided a while back that if I ever adopted a dog with a double-coat I would shave them, so I wouldn't have to deal with the super long hair (purely for my convenience). I hadn't known that the coat could end up looking like that though. Does Clipper alopecia happen often on shaved dogs?
Not all double coated breeds are long hair. (think labs, german shepherds ect0. Shaving a double coated breed is a huge no no. it can do ALOT worse damage then good. If you dont want a dlong haired dog to keep up with, then DONT get a long haired double coated breed. the hair is there for a reason.
 

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Are golden retrievers double coated? My parents have been shaving their goldens every summer for years and their coats have always looked pretty good.
I guess I don't understand how trimming is better for the coat than shaving.
 

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Are golden retrievers double coated? My parents have been shaving their goldens every summer for years and their coats have always looked pretty good.
I guess I don't understand how trimming is better for the coat than shaving.
yes GR's are double coated and should never ever be shaved. their coat is a insulator, helps keep them cool in summer, and warm in winter. ruins the guard hairs that help insulate by shaving them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 · (Edited)
Boy we sure are learning something about their coats, huh? So just trim their hair, huh? I have never shaved a dog but I think my dad use to shave our Scottish terrier in the summer.

Oh concerning hair, if you look at the picture of Snuggles with all the fur around her neck, I did cut that a couple weeks ago. Since she is a mixed breed, I guess there is no certain way that she needs to look.
 
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