Puppy Forum and Dog Forums banner

61 - 80 of 83 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,227 Posts
I have a question. I am training Brae on nosework at a casual level. He is doing really well! But he does this thing where he will pass over the odor and then come back to it. He does not indicate the incorrect container (a stage I struggled briefly with, with Soro). I don't sense a lack of understanding because he WILL indicate correctly in the end with no help from me. But does that indicate an... unsureness? Like, he needs to check out one or two areas first before making the choice? He *should* have a great nose. His mother was high scoring in the tracking portion of IPO (99/100), his father has his FR3 but I don't know the scores, and he has siblings and half siblings actively competing in nosework and doing SAR. I am mostly thinking he will get better the more he plays.

I am not too concerned about it since at the level I'm doing it at, time is not of the essence :) But I am curious from a training perspective what might be going on.

But here is a video, and skip to 3:00 to watch the two clips back to back:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,211 Posts
I wouldn't worry about it, some dogs like to check everything before committing. He may be wanting to make sure that the container is the strongest source of the odour.

I wouldn't think of it as being unsure, more like just how he searches.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,511 Posts
Can't watch the video because I'm at work but it's fairly normal and called cataloging. They like to check everything out first then go back and alert on the hides. I'm sure there are ways to work through it and get them to alert on first encounter but if you aren't worried about fast times I'd roll with it myself. Jubel likes to catalog sometimes, I'm okay with it as long as he does alert to it usually on the second pass.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
356 Posts
I must have missed your nose work in the video. You are doing very well from what I saw.

When we did SCH/IPO tracking we taught the dogs to find a sent pad then track step by step. We stamped out a triangular sent pad about 3 feet by 6 feet to start in about 4-6 inch grass. Football field is where I started. We put a single hotdog treat at the point of the long arrow. Then we introduced the dog to the scent pad carefull guiding him to the start point and reward. We only corrected by redirecting if he wanted to go out side of the pad. We then stepped a track heel to toe for about ten feet. Each toe print we added a single half moon hot dog treat. At the end was a small object. Jean patches work great. Pressed down deep in the grass. At first we didn't do any indication. Your dog looks like he would be a very fast learner and with your shown expertise you should be a good judge of how your dog is doing.

We continued this exercise at least a dozen times every day. Noting progress. The goal being to give a search command and the dog begin working where ever you are. He is to begin searching for the scent pad and start the track. As he gets more sure of the track you can add what ever indicator you need, sit,stand down. Bomb dogs were never ever to touch or even get close to the object. These guys we combined the search with area search. Adding an area search early on then all they did was find explosives and such. Later we added tracking. Not many dogs could do this, maybe it was our training but excitable dogs did not work too well. Enough.

I think you are skillful enough already to continue the deep nose tracking. I'd work out to a hundred yards or so with multiple articles. Have different track layers. Then increase the stride to say a shoe length and eventually a full stride. We went to bicycle, boots from two different people we even had a kid with a pogo stick. The bottom line is to create a drive to use his nose very deeply. Once he gets the idea, you add a direction change. Step back a little and make the steps closer together until he gets the idea he needs to change direction. Once he gets to 90 deg. turn you can take longer steps etc. I think you can get the idea. Try not to go to progress too fast. You want the dog to get success and rewards and not make mistakes....yet. Make him absolutely sure of the track. Judging by your obedience work you won't have any trouble with this.

Just keep in mind that we really don't know just how sensitive the dog's nose is. Try and think like the dog. The better you are at this the better you will become at tracking.

This may be a bit dated but it's how I was taught and while we didn't score 100 point track, we never failed a trial.
Byron
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,227 Posts
Thanks for your input Bentwings! I don't think we will be doing formal tracking, but I appreciate your expertise on this topic.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,291 Posts
I can't comment on nosework, tracking, or SAR. But I can tell you that in the OB Utility scent discrimination exercise, articles are placed approximately 6" apart which doesn't really leave much room between them. Dogs are allowed to "work" the articles for a reasonable amount of time provided they are working continuously, often going over the entire pile numerous times in a methodical fashion, until they choose the correct article, pick it up and return it to the handler. Spending time on selection is somewhat common due to the nature of the layout. No points are deducted for this.

ETA: here is a random video I found on youtube that shows the dog working the articles. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EKReZs2owIk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,214 Posts
I hope I can find somewhere within 100 miles of me to get more lessons once this class ends. That's the hard part of rural living. I would love to do more.
I really like the online classes at Fenzi Dog Sports Academy. https://fenzidogsportsacademy.com/ The next session starts on December 1st. Registration opens on November 22nd.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
254 Posts
Thanks Sandakat for reviving this thread again! Please keep us updated on how Mesa is doing. I'd love to follow along and see more what it's about.

I think it's something Atlas would like, as he does seem pretty apt to use his nose. (Compared to my previous dog, who I'm not sure knew he had a nose, haha. If Shauni couldn't see you, he definitely couldn't find you!) A few weeks ago on a walk, Atlas was 'tracking' a trail made by a neighbour on her horse who had gone by shortly before we left for our walk. Now, it's cheating a bit in the snow because the tracks are pretty obvious, but he was definitely putting his nose in almost every track and had his head down just boogeying along, at a handful of different points on our walk. Don't get me wrong, I'm not thinking he's going to go and rock nosework, but it put nosework on the list of 'must try' instead of a 'maybe someday'.

Edit: I wish the FDSA Get Focused class was running in December! That is exactly what Atlas I need right now. Our Rally-O instructor (who I believe does follow Denise Fenzi's training methods as she has mentioned it on a couple of occasions) has given me some tips, which I definitely intend to implement. If we still need this course in February, I will definitely be signing up!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,214 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,500 Posts
I'm not very good at doing online classes. The good thing is I found an intermediate nose work class in Reno, which is only about 45 miles from me. They train up to advanced and have a lot of students doing trials, so I'm pretty jazzed about it. Even better, there will only be about 2 weeks between this first class ending and the new one starting so we won't have to redo much stuff.

This week we did searches for treats in the same room we've been in but with the big storage closet open and stuff like a garbage can, a podium, some random chairs, etc in the room to distract the dog. She did pretty well but we had to give her a hint about the treat hidden in the storage room. I'll try to post some videos later.

I just love watching the dogs think about what they're doing and puzzling it out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,500 Posts
I went to my first intermediate class. This first class was a dogless discussion of scents and hides. I felt like I was auditing a 400 level class. OMG I am so far behind everyone else since Mesa has only searched for treats and never scents. But after the class the instructor spent about half an hour with me introducing her to birch. She was able to very quickly go from finding the birch with a treat to just the birch and getting the reward after. The instructor was very happy with her and feels she will catch up to the others very quickly.

Of course, when I got home I went online and ordered a box and some scents so I can practice at home. I can see how this could become an obsession. I think this class is going to be a lot of fun.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,500 Posts
Mesa has been doing great with the class. The instructor was great at working her at her own level so that now she's catching up to the more advanced dogs in the class. In fact, she's encouraged me to sign Mesa up for an ORT that's being given in April. I know the ORT isn't a trial, but I'm pretty excited about it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,500 Posts
Mesa passed her ORT in all 3 odors today. It was a long day with a lot of waiting in the car. Quite a few dogs didn't pass the third odor because they were tired and over it and just lost focus. Mesa started out a little pokey on the 3rd one but she decided it would be fun to knock the boxes around the room and that got her motivated. LOL. She showed me which box had the odor by pounding it with both of her front feet. It wasn't subtle, but it was correct. As we were leaving the test room the judge mentioned that I would have to work on the way she alerts. Yeah, I can't argue with that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,214 Posts
I found an online titling venue called Cyber K9 that offers scent work titles. They aren't exactly hard, but they are fun.

Lily was the first ever dog to earn a Cyber K9 Novice Scent Detection title.



About an hour later, Leo became the second dog to earn a Cyber K9 Novice Scent Detection title.



This is the Facebook group that Cyber K9 operates from.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,500 Posts
We did our first AKC scent work trial at the Novice A level on Monday. I am so proud of my girl! She Q'd on interiors, exteriors and containers. She NQ'd buried but half the dogs missed that element. In any case, both the interior and exterior judges complemented us on her focus and thoroughness in her searching. Yay!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,500 Posts
We had a great weekend trialing in AKC Novice. Mesa Q'd in 10 out of 11 searches. With her one previous trial she now has 4 Q's in Exteriors, 4 Q's in Containers, 3 Q's in Interiors and 2 Q's in Buried. That means she has element titles in 3 out of the 4 elements and we're only one Buried Q short of her Novice title!

Here she is with her ribbons from this weekend. Unfortunately she faulted in Buried because she went around rather than through the starting blocks in the second trial or she might have been High Novice for that trial. Oh well, we still had a great time and I'm so proud of her.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,500 Posts
OMG! NW1 is a LEVEL OF MAGNITUDE harder than AKC Scent Work Novice or even Advanced! This weekend was truly a humbling experience.

I had no idea how large the search areas were going to be or how difficult. The trial was at an elementary school in Livermore, Ca. They were able to use the classrooms and the outdoor areas for the trial. I was hyperventilating half way through the walkthrough.

I think it was my fault, rather than Mesa's that we blew the Container search. I think she showed me the correct one but I went all the way around the circle of boxes and then came back, but I stopped one short of the correct one.

The Interior was an elementary school classroom. The WHOLE classroom with all of the crap in it. She was simply amazing on the Interior. She worked it out so nicely and showed me where it was in no uncertain terms. That was our only Q.

The exterior was a double row of hedges with grass in between and walls on either side. I had no idea where to even start that one, so I gave her her choice on where to go. She alerted on one of the walls pretty strongly after working that section very intently. It was wrong, and I've been told the hide was on a chair but I don't remember even seeing a chair.

There were 3 vehicles in the vehicle search. The most I've practiced is 2 vehicles right next to each other. These 3 were fairly widely separated. Once again she alerted strongly on one but it was wrong. The judge showed me where it was and she did alert on it when I brought her over to it. I think she was really tired and done by that point, though.

I'm not sorry I went to the trial even though we didn't title. I got to spend a day working with my dog. I learned a lot. And I got to go home with the only Beauceron in the trial!
 
61 - 80 of 83 Posts
Top