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Discussion Starter #1
Currently, I'm feeding all my dogs Taste of The Wild. Even my poodle (previously on raw because of itchies) is on it because a friend of mine is going to be using him as a grooming competition dog and she doesn't want to take raw meat along with her as she travels. So for a few weeks, he's going to be a kibble puppy. :) Anyway, I've been doing some reading about how high protein can be damaging, blah blah blah. And it has come up recently here on df. SO now I'm a little bit worried: is TOTW considered high protein? Is it possible that it can damage my dogs? I'm feeding the Pacific Stream formula, and the label says that is has a minimum of 25% crude protein. Mostly I'm worried about my 13.5 yo dog Pepper...everyone else is young and very active. I had Pepper's kidney function tested a few months ago because she was going on Rimadyl for a back injury and the vet wanted to make sure her kidneys were ok, and everything came back excellent. So should I be worried? Or am I being paranoid? Opinions are welcome, thanks so much. :)

P.S. I've started adding liquid (water, broth, raw egg) to everyone's food, as I've read that more hydration helps flush any excess protein...is that needed?
 

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I would consider TOTW pacific pretty low protein.

Add water if you are worried about their water consumption.
 

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25% min. crude protein is about average for kibble. Most of the discussion about high protein foods around here refer to foods with protein levels around 35% and up. Taste of the Wild is one of the few brands that offers moderate protein grain free formulas; I think what you're feeding sounds perfectly fine, and your dogs' health and test results are a testament to that!

I personally add water (and occasionally canned food or raw egg) to my dog's kibble. He doesn't drink a lot of water, and even if he did, the added moisture can't hurt and can only help. One word of caution though; I don't know what kind of dog you have or what the exact ingredients of your food are, but there have been reports that adding water to foods preserved with citric acid can increase the risk of bloat. If you have a breed prone to bloat and the ingredients list citric acid, I would forget about adding water. But otherwise it's fine!
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
OK, thanks guys, that was very helpful. :) I didn't realize that 25% protein is considered average, I guess I'm used to foods with grain in it, which usually ends up being somewhere around 20-22% protein.

I don't think any of my dogs are prone to bloat, but now I'm going to go make double sure. Thanks for the heads up. :)

EDIT: ok, take that back, I forgot that poodles can be prone to bloat....I'll be careful. :wink:
 

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Older dogs actually need more protein than younger dogs. High protein content does not actually harm dogs. Excess protein is either converted to energy or naturally removed from the body. It has been proved that high protein diets and kidney disease are not connected. The biggest concern is actually protein quality not quantity. Lowering protein consumption has been seen to do more bad than good.
 

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There was a study published on the IAMS site about protein. I hope to always be able to feed my dog at least 32% meat based protein as a result. Sassy ate nearly 50% more protein as an ill geriatric dog and I am quite sure it kept her muscles stronger so she didn't ever go down. She had a nerve issue that looked like degenerative myelopathy and stood at the strangest angles but she rarely fell and could always get up just fine.
http://www.iams.com/dog-article/importance_of_animal-based_proteins_in_dog_foods.aspx
 
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