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I once read the book Ceasar's Way (an interesting account by Ceasar Millan), and came across something he said which I partially disagreed with. He stated that dogs do not have a personality, but owners thrust one upon them. I agree that as he was explaining, accesories such as cute collars and pretty pink bedding do not define a dog, let alone depict their characteristics, but I strongly believe that each dog has an individual personality.
I owned a rambunctious boxer pup, who had the oddest quirks and strongest personality I've ever seen, and could see in her characteristics the same attitude I can see in any human.
I am strongly against personification in pets, but I do think that each dog has a visible personality. Am I the only one who feels this way?
 

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IMO dog's have personalities. I remember when I got Upendi she was so tiny, but she had the BIGGEST personality. Still does in fact. :D
 

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Save yourself some trouble and time, don't listen to Ceasar! Hallie is full of personality. All dogs would act and be the same if they didn't have personalities. I don't believe they have personalities to the extent that humans do.The definition of personality is the state or quality of being a person! I guess if you think of it in a literal way then no, dogs don't have personalities. But I don't the statement was meant to be taken in a literal way.
 

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Nope, I think that statement was worded wrong. Obviously each dog has it's own personality or we wouldn't have dogs we liked over the next. Each one is an individual. I do not think things like silly collars or coats make the dog any happier then a crappy old collar and ugly coat. I do think that each dog is unique in it's own right though.
 

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While all 3 of my Standard Poodles share Poodley traits or characteristics, each has a distinct personality unique to him/herself. So, once again, Cesar knows nothing of what he's talking about.
 

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Dogs have plenty of personality, maybe even as much as ourselves--they just express it differently, so we can't pick up on every level of it.
 

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Heh, and how does Cesar know if dog's don't have personalities? Did the dogs tell him? No? Then he doesn't know for certain. :)

There's a difference between saying "Buying stuff doesn't define the dog or his behavior" and saying "dogs have no personality".

How he makes that logical leap is baffling to me :confused:
 

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i definitely think they have personalities! you can feed, train and treat two dogs of the same age and breed the same way and they are not clones of each other in the way they respond to the attention. temperament is a part of personality.

do i think that we incorrectly project human EMOTION onto our dogs- absolutely. Beemer doesn't do cute things to make me happy- he does them to get attention, praise, and treats. i have to remember that he isn't sad or missing me when i'm away, and that he isn't MAD at me when we go away for several days.
 

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Nope, I think that statement was worded wrong. Obviously each dog has it's own personality or we wouldn't have dogs we liked over the next. Each one is an individual. I do not think things like silly collars or coats make the dog any happier then a crappy old collar and ugly coat. I do think that each dog is unique in it's own right though.
Ditto, Ditto and more Dittos.
 

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I am a master of disguises. Vanna is our Haus-Frau. :D
If I ever have a female dog, I'm naming her (or at least will train her recall to be) "Frau"

Or maybe "Fräulein"

Just such fun words to say.
 

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I don't know,:eek: Wally the wonder dog might get a tad jealous with a Fraulein in the home, could be trouble in the house.:D
 

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I read that book, and what I understood Cesar to say was that dogs have dog-alities, not person-alities. They aren't people, they are animals.

This discussions reminds me of the Time or Newsweek cover story (many years ago) that stated something like "Scientists Discover That Dogs Have Feelings". Duh! I could have been paid a bazillion dollars to "discover" that!

Of course every living thing is unique in the way they see things. It's the nature of nature. Just my opinion, of course.
 

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I read that book, and what I understood Cesar to say was that dogs have dog-alities, not person-alities. They aren't people, they are animals.
Sounds like going too far in the "don't humanize your dog" direction. I mean, yeah, they aren't people, but it just sounds like Cesar is taking the word "personality" way too literally, especially when the end result is the same - recognizing dogs have their unique take on things.

Reminds me of the whole manhole/womanhole - or chairman/chairwoman thing.

It means the same thing, the end result is the same thing - just have to put the "proper" term to it.

I don't know,:eek: Wally the wonder dog might get a tad jealous with a Fraulein in the home, could be trouble in the house.:D
Hahahaha - you are probably right! :D
 

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Last time I checked the human specie is still part of the animal reign and is a mammal just like dogs and dolphins ;)

Dogs and many animals have a lot of personality, they have their own likes and dislikes. Akira will spit out bananas if I give them to him but loves pineapples but Filou loves bananas and eating generally.

I was reading in National Geographic that scientists are just coming out of an era where we thought that all other animals were like machines, programmed to do something (instincts) rather than intelligent. Well, animals are intelligent whether they are humans or not. Scientists have even realised that some dogs appear to have some kind of abstract intelligence !

I think that we like to underestimate other animals because it makes us humans feel better.
 

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Totally disagree with Cesar's statement.

YES, things that an owner does can influence the dog's temperament.. allowing bad behaviors, spoiling a dog, not socializing, etc. But to say that a dog has no personality at all is pretty extreme. My dog has her quirks and I'm pretty sure she didn't get them all from me.
 

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Ditto what others have said... we have raised all our Standards just about the same, but they each have distinctive personality traits, even the littermates.

I used to buy the line about dogs not having emotions. Um, I know with 100% certainty that they absolutely DO have emotions... no, I'm not humanizing; it's just a simple fact... but I full well know this is not accepted by 99.999% of the dog-owning world. :D
 

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I read that book, and what I understood Cesar to say was that dogs have dog-alities, not person-alities. They aren't people, they are animals.

This discussions reminds me of the Time or Newsweek cover story (many years ago) that stated something like "Scientists Discover That Dogs Have Feelings". Duh! I could have been paid a bazillion dollars to "discover" that!

Of course every living thing is unique in the way they see things. It's the nature of nature. Just my opinion, of course.
Just for giggles DF-ers should just go out and mention the word dog-ality in a sentence to different people because I wonder how many people would say what is that. The whole idea is to be understood when talking and if you say my dog's personality versus dog-ality anybody with a half a brain will understand what you are saying, I also don't believe the thought by saying it you are humanizing the dog.
 

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I think dogs, like people, are products nature and nuture....We are born with tendencies and predispositions for certain behaviors/preferences/likes/dislikes/attitudes, but that our environment also plays a large role in which of these tendencies are expressed and the degree to which they are expressed.

I have that Cesar book, but haven't read it. I think he has a lot of practical, common sense advice but I wonder how much of his books are really his writing. I've read only one and there were some bits that didn't set right with me. That's ok, I take what I can from everything I read and file away that which seems irrelevant or doesn't make sense.
 
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