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Ok so I finally got my GSD pup and she's doing fantastic. Toilet training hasn't been a problem at all (she's only pooped in the house once and that was on her very first night home) although she doesn't always go on command but that's not her fault if she doesn't have anything I guess.

Anyways one thing I am having trouble with is biting. Now she's 10 weeks old and I've had her for a week now. At first, her biting was very soft and gentle so it didn't bother me much but over the last couple days, the biting has become quite painful. She is very nicely behaved in her crate (where she pretty much sleeps as long as she's in there) but when she's out, she tends to have these biting rampages where she just wants to chew and bite everything (mostly my ankles and shoes).

I've done quite a bit of research into this. I've bought a tonne of chew toys for her but she has zero interest in them. When she bites me or something undesirable, I stick a bone or toy into her mouth but she shows unwavering intent to keep biting me or my shoe, ect. On the off chance she does opt to go for the bone, I praise her immediately and give her a treat (beef liver) but she usually loses interest in the toy pretty fast anyways.

I've also tried to calm her down during her frenzies by laying her on her side and trying to calm her down but that doesn't seem to work either. I exaggerate the pain that she causes me when biting and express to her that I'm hurt but that has no effect on her either.

So should I be trying anything new or just keep at what I've been doing in hopes that she will catch on eventually?

Oh and another thing I've been noticing is that Vicky doesn't give me her attention when I want it. When I call her name, she either just looks at me and then goes about her business again or ignores me completely. Now I've only had her for a week so is this completely normal? Is there anything I could do to command her attention?

Sorry for the long post but I really do hope some advice can be offered to me. Thanks in advance!
 

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Anyone have any tips at all? According to the The Bite Stops Here, I should be removing myself from the situation but my house is very open plan so there are no confined spaces so I'm putting her outside and closing the blinds for a couple minutes when she's calm again. Is this an OK approach?

Also I've now noticed that it's usually when I take something away from her that she was chewing on but wasn't supposed to be like a sock or shoe that she goes into crazy mode. Is she biting because she's feeling threatened and trying to protect the thing she was chewing on? Also when I have to throw her into the yard, she goes even crazier so I really have to man handle her, do I need to be very gentle with her when carrying her out?
 

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It could be that she goes crazy because you are unknowingly reinforcing the behavior. See even though you tell her roughly "No" or you push her away, this may be interpreted as rough play which only encourages further biting. The best way to teach bite inhibition is with ignoring the pooch. If you are taking her somewhere else because she is going crazy, do so in a simple, non-fuss, and quite manner.

To create a negative association with chewing on inappropriate things, you may want to try bitter apple or another repellant spray. You spray it on your hand (for instance) and when she takes a bite it should taste rather disgusting so she will be less inclined to bite. Yelping when your puppy bites you hard and then completely giving her the cold shoulder when she is trying to solicit your attention should teach her that what she did was wrong, this is actually how littermates teach eachother when biting is starting to get out of hand.

Trading is a good idea, give her a tempting treat (such as a peice of ham) and trade her for the thing she has decided to chew on.

Short attention spans are common with puppies, the key is to building them. Teaching the "Watch Me" command might help you out.

Also chewing may also be resolved by fulfilling her physical AND mental needs. Basic obedience training and frequent short walks should work.

Here is some further reading on bite inhibition: http://www.dogstardaily.com/training/teaching-bite-inhibition
 

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If you can find friends with dogs that you trust and know that are completely vaccinated to play with your pup, that will help alot.

Olders dogs "teach" younger dogs, how to play nice. This has helped with Kina a lot. As well, like Jr. Dog has suggested, yelping and ignoring when your puppy bites has also worked with Kina.

Good luck.
 

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squeal and retract. dont push, dont use a harsh tone, squeal and retract. when puppies start playing too rough with each other, they squeal and retract as to say "ouch! that was too hard! i dont want to play with you anymore!"
 

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My dog nips and bites sometimes, and I just grab her mouth closed (not tight) sternly tell her no, and then become very disinterested in her. She typically gets the idea the first time I do it, but when she's really playful it will take twice.

I don't know if that's what a lot of other people do - it just proves to be effective for me.
 

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Check out this video: http://www.expertvillage.com/video/8785_dog-training-puppy-biting.htm

All of her videos are really helpful. I just adopted a pound puppy myself and had that problem a little bit too. Really most behavior problems arise from lack of exercise followed by the dog not viewing you as the alpha. For exercise, it's really important to take the pooch on a walk every day, do a training session once or twice a day, and play games with your puppy. I noticed a huuuuge positive change in the biting problem once Nala started learning to play fetch. From my experience, the dog park wasn't the best b/c she seemed to pick up some bad habits but you might try posting on Craigslist for a playmate-- that way you can be more selective. Those should all help b/c a tired puppy is a happy puppy. On top of that, you have to establish dominance. I found the NILIF protocol extremely helpful-- just google NILIF for more info. It's also key to keep the pooch in a crate unless you are actively playing with her-- it's a good place for her to learn to love all those fantastic chew toys you bought her :) Oh yes, a Kong is an absolute must along with a yummy bone and my baby loves this "Petstages" toy that I can put in the freezer so it's cold and helps those poor swollen gums. On that note, she also likes to chew on ice.
 
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