Puppy Forum and Dog Forums banner

1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I adopted a 7 week old lab mix from a horrible situation and noticing some mild behaviors that I would like to nip in the butt . I'm not sure what she is crossed with, either a shephard or Akita based on her cost but it might be too soon to tell. I have a 6 year old male boxer named Loki and he is doing amazing with her and so is my 2 year old F5 Savannah cat Sawyer. I think she has made a wonderful addition and my children 9 and 4 (boy and girl) are over the moon for her. The only issues I have noticed and because I have never encountered them before just need to know if its age appropriate for her being so young. Firstly, she has some food aggression with me and my boy Loki. She doesn't bite, she just growls when him or I go near her food. The last time she growled at me, I pulled her food away, made her look at me and told her no. How do I handle this so it doesn't turn into a problem later on. Secondly, she is doing amazing for her age for pottying. I have puppy pads and 90 % of the time she uses them which I think is great, BUT she keeps pooping and peeing on my boy Loki bed. Is this a dominance thing or is it just cause it has his smell on it? Thanks in advance everyone... Oh and our new girls names is Gyda
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,744 Posts
Taking away her food and scolding her is likely to make the guarding worse, actually, because you're teaching her that you will take her food, so she has reason to guard it. Growling is actually a good thing - it's communication. Punish the growling, and she may decide she needs to skip the warning and go straight for a bite to keep dogs/people away from her food. Instead, toss her extra tasty nibbles while she's eating. Drop them in her bowl or next to her in passing, don't hover or loom over her, so she learns that you approaching her while she's eating is awesome and not something to get defensive about. As for your other dog, keep them separated while eating! Especially while she's so small and new to your household. Just let her have some peace and quiet so she feels safe while eating.

As for the pottying, she's a tiny baby. She has only minimal control over her bowels and bladder at this point, and probably doesn't even know she has to go until she has to go RIGHT NOW, kind of like a small toddler. It could be that she just happens to be on the other dog's bed, or it could be that it's hard for her to understand the difference between the pads and other pad-like things on the floor (my own dog was pad-trained before he came home, and he would pee on the rugs, bathmat, discarded clothes, etc.). Additionally, most dogs prefer to pee on soft surfaces anyway, so it's not surprising she's pottying where she is. Do you have a private outdoor space that isn't trafficked by unknown dogs or wildlife? If so, I'd start right away with outdoor potty training to reduce confusion over how pottying indoors sometimes is okay, but sometimes not. If not, I understand the disease concern, so I'd continue to regularly move her to the pads, rewarding for pottying correctly, and ignoring accidents elsewhere. Don't punish her for accidents - remember, she's a tiny baby and you don't want her to feel like she can't potty in front of you. And clean up her accidents with a cleaner specifically for pet messes like Nature's Miracle. Otherwise, her nose can still smell her old messes and that signals to her that the bed is an okay place to potty.

It's not a dominance thing at all, so no worries there. Dogs don't really have a strict hierarchy, let alone start worrying about it when they're puppies! Good luck, and keep us updated!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Thnxs for the info, I have started to hand feed her some of her food and kept my boxer away while she is eating and we have not had any growling what so ever. My cat even went up to her bowl and nothing. I removed and threw out my big boys bed and am going to get him something that more resembles a bed. It was just a foam mat, she was clearly confused by it and that's why she was going on it. She has an actual bed and has not went to the bathroom on it. Thank you for the info. ??
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,373 Posts
What Daysleepers said EXCEPT I would simply crate the puppy by himself and let him eat when you feed him out of a bowl.

I have never understood this need for a dog to give up his meal. We don't expect it of each other or of other animals.. but a dog? Why do we do this? We were always taught to leave the dog alone when he is eating (and that first dog when I was a kid enforced it clearly.. a Beagle named Wags!).

This does not mean he should not work for his food. You can feed by hand as he gets older with him working for his food. However, when you feed him in a bowl, just put him by himself and let him eat. Usually my puppies get 15 minutes to eat the meal. At the end of 15 minutes I take the bowl up. It is always empty.
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top