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I got Louie 2 weeks ago and since day one he’s been extremely vocal. If I walk away he screams, I cannot walk him outside as he screams when there’s people close by. I keep him close to me and now he stopped crying and screaming so much at night, but if he doesn’t get his way, he full blown yelps until he does. It’s been hard because I live with others and the crying and yelling is constant. Now when I take a bath, I just walk away quickly as I do feel bad leaving him on his own. I don’t know how to solve it as I’ve tried ignoring him and leaving to the store without him. He still carries on. I did a Petco training class and the lady suggested keeping him away from others, but even doing so he has shown to be persistent. If we keep him in one area too long he starts tugging and screaming.
 

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He was 4 weeks old when you got him?
 

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Oof, yeah, he's a tiny infant who was taken from his mom and littermates way too young, especially if he's only six weeks now. He must've barely been weaned if he was separated at four weeks. Puppies are typically sent home at eight weeks because they need that time to be with their moms and littermates, to learn from one another and have that attention and security during a critical developmental period. He sounds extremely stressed and scared, honestly. He's definitely not trying to 'get his way', any more than a scared human baby would be trying to 'get their way' by screaming after their entire world was upturned and they suddenly had to spend most of their time on their own. Their physical needs might be getting met, but their emotional and social needs just aren't.

I get that stuff happens, and he's with you now. But you've set yourself up for a much more difficult puppy raising experience than most, and are going to need to put in extra energy and time here. Comfort him when possible. You will never ruin a scared or distressed dog by giving them comfort and attention, despite what many people will tell you. Get him comfortable and happy sleeping through the night with you, and you can always train him to sleep on the floor or in another room later, once he's more settled and confident. Work very hard to make the space you're leaving him in - crate, pen, puppy-safe room, whatever - a super positive space to be in. This may be a case where one of those plush animals you can put warm water in and has an artificial 'heartbeat' may actually benefit, since he can't have mom or littermates to snuggle with, but observe him with it before you leave him with it alone, to make sure he doesn't try to rip it up or anything.

This is not a case where I'd be taking a Petco trainer's advice, because I would not want a puppy this young to be in constant distress. This can have serious effects on their development and their ability to feel safe and confident as an adult. You don't want him to learn the world is scary when he's in this critical period of brain development. If possible, see if you can get a phone consult with an actual behaviorist, preferably one certified through an organization like CCPDT or IAABC (both orgs have a 'find a professional near me' function on their websites) so you know that they have a real understanding of dog behavior and practice working with behavior issues.

I'm just a dog nerd - I like learning about animal behavior, but am far, far from being any kind of working professional - so I don't know what the best option is for you in this scenario. I just know that having a tiny puppy in frequent distress during a period where they're actively learning what is and isn't scary in the world is a bad idea, and his young age will mean you have to approach this differently than you would an adult dog. Just like you'd try different things with an upset and scared toddler than an upset and scared 20-something.
 

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Oof, yeah, he's a tiny infant who was taken from his mom and littermates way too young, especially if he's only six weeks now. He must've barely been weaned if he was separated at four weeks. Puppies are typically sent home at eight weeks because they need that time to be with their moms and littermates, to learn from one another and have that attention and security during a critical developmental period. He sounds extremely stressed and scared, honestly. He's definitely not trying to 'get his way', any more than a scared human baby would be trying to 'get their way' by screaming after their entire world was upturned and they suddenly had to spend most of their time on their own. Their physical needs might be getting met, but their emotional and social needs just aren't.

I get that stuff happens, and he's with you now. But you've set yourself up for a much more difficult puppy raising experience than most, and are going to need to put in extra energy and time here. Comfort him when possible. You will never ruin a scared or distressed dog by giving them comfort and attention, despite what many people will tell you. Get him comfortable and happy sleeping through the night with you, and you can always train him to sleep on the floor or in another room later, once he's more settled and confident. Work very hard to make the space you're leaving him in - crate, pen, puppy-safe room, whatever - a super positive space to be in. This may be a case where one of those plush animals you can put warm water in and has an artificial 'heartbeat' may actually benefit, since he can't have mom or littermates to snuggle with, but observe him with it before you leave him with it alone, to make sure he doesn't try to rip it up or anything.

This is not a case where I'd be taking a Petco trainer's advice, because I would not want a puppy this young to be in constant distress. This can have serious effects on their development and their ability to feel safe and confident as an adult. You don't want him to learn the world is scary when he's in this critical period of brain development. If possible, see if you can get a phone consult with an actual behaviorist, preferably one certified through an organization like CCPDT or IAABC (both orgs have a 'find a professional near me' function on their websites) so you know that they have a real understanding of dog behavior and practice working with behavior issues.

I'm just a dog nerd - I like learning about animal behavior, but am far, far from being any kind of working professional - so I don't know what the best option is for you in this scenario. I just know that having a tiny puppy in frequent distress during a period where they're actively learning what is and isn't scary in the world is a bad idea, and his young age will mean you have to approach this differently than you would an adult dog. Just like you'd try different things with an upset and scared toddler than an upset and scared 20-something.
I absolutely feel terrible and felt terrible. The first few nights I knew he was really missing what he had previously. The biggest things I’ve noticed is he gets very excited to walk. The main cause of the barking and screaming is due to him wanting to socialize. Some people don’t like dogs or just don’t want to say hi and I can’t control that. This is where things turn ugly and he starts. If the people decide to say hi and pet him, he’s quiet. I’m going to definitely call a behaviorist and see what I can do in the meantime as he really isn’t a bad dog at all. I just really try to get the walks in as his breed likes activity. Now I try to take him out at 2-3 am when hardly anybody is outside so that he can get some exercise. He hates it after a while, yet for 7 weeks he’s pretty big. I will look into the plush with heart beat in it! Sadly the lady who sold him to me was very keen on selling all the puppies.
 

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Yeah, it's really sad that people can't do the bare minimum to make sure their dogs don't reproduce, then can't even be bothered to take care of the puppies the way they need.

Screaming/barking from excitement and frustration on a leash is a little different than the separation stuff at home. While meeting people is good for puppies, it's also important that they learn how to just chill when there's people and other dogs around. I'd actually avoid having anyone greet him on leash right now unless he stays (relatively) calm while they approach. To start working on this, find somewhere that you can watch people at a distance - like across a parking lot where people are going in and out of a business, and practice getting his attention when he sees people. You can combine it with things like the name game ("Name!" you give a treat, "Name!" give a treat, etc. Using the dog's real name, of course), or practicing sit or other fun behaviors he knows. Keep it happy and positive. You can even teach him a specific 'watch me' cue to direct his attention away from other people. Staring at something exciting tends to lead to building excitement and frustration, so by interrupting that staring is the first step towards teaching him more appropriate behaviors around other people on leash. Teach him now that calm behaviors are what gets him the opportunity to greet people, and how to stay calm by redirecting his attention to you and practicing known, fun behaviors with you, and you'll be setting him up very nicely going forward.
 

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I absolutely feel terrible and felt terrible. The first few nights I knew he was really missing what he had previously. The biggest things I’ve noticed is he gets very excited to walk. The main cause of the barking and screaming is due to him wanting to socialize. Some people don’t like dogs or just don’t want to say hi and I can’t control that. This is where things turn ugly and he starts. If the people decide to say hi and pet him, he’s quiet. I’m going to definitely call a behaviorist and see what I can do in the meantime as he really isn’t a bad dog at all. I just really try to get the walks in as his breed likes activity. Now I try to take him out at 2-3 am when hardly anybody is outside so that he can get some exercise. He hates it after a while, yet for 7 weeks he’s pretty big. I will look into the plush with heart beat in it! Sadly the lady who sold him to me was very keen on selling all the puppies.
Please talk with your vet asap about getting the puppy vaccine series going as normally the first jabs are before the pup leaves from the breeder at 8 weeks and are then continued every few weeks to try to catch the time when the maternal antibodies wear off and minimize the time the pup is left unprotected

If a breeder is selling 4 week old puppies, I have my doubts that mama dog was completely up to date on her own vaccinations, possibly meaning pup has no protection currently.

Parvo risk varies a lot by area but if you are walking in public and encountering places where other dog are OR have been in the past, you NEED to talk to your vet about your local risk level. In my area, a pup without at least 2 of the combo vaccine series is a high risk to take out in public at all.

I'm not trying to give you something extra to worry about, just that its important with such a baby puppy to take extra precautions and considerations.

From a training point of view, I would not be letting a puppy that young be meeting ANY dogs on walks nor any strangers. Only humans that I knew well and would know how the humans would interact with the puppy.

At that age, they don't need (nor should have) long walks or vigorous exercise. a good rule of thumb is 5 minutes per month of age for on-leash walking.
 

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Shell makes good points, and in retrospect, you should probably just ease off leashed walks and re-introduce them when puppy's a little older and more relaxed and confident overall. At least after the first vaccination or two. My advice still stands for working through frustration and excitement on leash, but it can wait until he's a little older and more settled with you and with life in general.
 
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