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Okay so I adopted Jimmy 4 years ago from the shelter. He is an adorable dog that is great with humans. Never ever barks or attacks humans. Only one problem, completely opposite with dogs. He whines, growls, tenses up and attacks other dogs when he is capable of reaching them.

I have included a video of his behavior while me and my girlfriend were out walking by the beach. In the video he sees a few dogs and you can clearly see his attitude.

I have no idea how to help him. Now this isn't with all dogs. He has managed to get along with a handful of dogs in all this time. It seems the ones that he gets along with are the ones who show their dominance or they are low energy so he doesn't feel threatened.

I apologize for any cussing in the video.

 

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Nice job getting a video. It really illustrates the dog's behaviors.

So what I would recommend are a few things:
-Get that dog into a harness asap. He is pulling so much and you guys are yanking, which is not good for any dog's neck.
-I would have stopped pretty much where the video starts. He is clearly unfocused, overaroused, and fixated on something... Even before you hit the busy street. Training for calm and working on reactivity, which is the challenge Jimmy faces with dogs, happens well before you walk right at another dog. Jimmy needs to be calm before the training can happen.
-Stop yanking or reprimanding him. Clearly it isn't working, and it might be adding more stress. Owners' reactions strongly contribute to reactivity issues.

Finding a trainer who uses positive reinforcement based training and has experience with reactivity would be your best bet.
 

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Reminds me a ton of my boy, actually. Hard to say without seeing the "attacking" behavior (and I definitely understand why you don't want to set that up for a recording!) but I'd be inclined to think (in my limited experience) that this is frustration-based reactivity. Basically, leash reactivity can be roughly divided into "I'm really excited about this other dog but CAN'T SAY HI" or "this other dog is really scary MUST MAKE THEM GO AWAY", and even the first one can turn into behavior that looks aggressive because the dog is so amped up it explodes at the other dog.

I highly, highly recommend getting "Feisty Fido" by Dr. Patricia McConnell. It's a cheap and short book specifically about leash reactivity - you can even get it as an ebook - and it has really clear explanations about what causes it, how to train and manage it, and why the techniques work the way they do. It's helping us out a ton right now, and even if you find a qualified trainer to help, it's an excellent resource. Looks like you're doing a great job at keeping your boy from physically greeting other dogs. If it is frustration reactivity, you don't want him to learn that his fussing gets him access to other dogs, and if it's fear-based, it's safer for everyone. We will often pull off into side streets or cross the street if necessary to avoid greetings.

I agree with Canyx about yanking the leash. It may well be adding to his reactivity - it's very similar to how police dogs are "agitated" by restraining and pulling them back from what they really want to increase their intensity through frustration. Great for bitework, not so much for polite walking haha. Of course you can't avoid all leash tension when you have a lunging dog, but I really try not to add to that. This is where a harness really helped us. A well-fitted harness takes the pressure off the dog's neck (and all the delicate structures within: vertebrae, trachea, thyroid gland, etc.) so you don't have to worry about the dog choking itself while it's lunging. A front-clip harness gives you even more control, because they pivot the dog around when they lunge instead of allowing them to throw all their weight forward.

It's a lot easier to teach a dog a new, incompatible behavior than to teach it what not to do, so much of the work I'm doing with Sam right now is making his "watch" cue super, super reliable by practicing it a lot and in lots of different places (nothing super distracting at first, you've gotta work up), with frequent and high-value rewards. We started in the house, but now he's doing well outside where there are kids and other people around, and even cats and other dogs if they're a long way away! Teaching your dog to break that fixation and refocus on you is huge in improving reactivity. It cuts off that cycle of rising frustration (or fear) and gives the dog something polite and productive to do instead. The book explains it way better than I could, though, haha.
 
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