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Hi Friends,
My name is Kandace and I would greatly appreciate some help. I just adopted the most adorable Husky I named him Kodiak. They think he's around 6 years old, he's 40lbs (underweight), and he's VERY well trained. Well except for the fact that he won't stop BOOKING it the second he gets off leash. I've only had him for 4 days. I know it's a little early to be complaining, he's just adjusting to his new home etc... and I'm doing all in my power to make sure he doesn't get away.
He's sweet and cuddly to me. He follows me all over the house. I am finding out he knows a ton of tricks. I need some tips on how to get him adjusted to home. I don't know where he came from originally. All the shelter could tell me is that he came from another shelter. I guess he escaped his foster home, and the foster parents didn't care to try and get him back, they didn't report him missing or anything. They caught him again, and sent him to another foster because of Covid19. I called up and adopted him. I understand that when he's running away he's trying to "go home". He has "separation anxiety" which i've only really seen signs of it when he books it. he's really good home alone (i've only left him for an hour at the most).-He's not food motivated. I can barley get him to eat treats. Poor boy, he's probably so stressed he doesn't want to eat.
He's just learning his name. I know he knows it because he'll come when called when were in the house. He is really good on leash, no pulling, and he's the perfect dog for jogging. He's gotten away from me twice and my boyfriend once. (we're learning). Now I know to not trust this cunning little turd. I've read give his some of his old stuff so he can adjust; however, I have no old stuff to give him.
Mostly when he gets away he KNOWS what he's doing. He's an escape artist and he knows how to play you. I understand he loves the thrill of the chase. I end up running around 2 miles, and I know what all my neighbors back yards look like now. Please Please give me any advise! Thank you for your time!!!
 

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It took me a few months with my little Remy... He was like velcro around the house but if he got a chance he headed to the horizon. He had learned to survive on his own and learned that humans meant trouble so why trust anyone?
He had to get used to a house, feeding times, a new name, a bed, it was a huge learning curve and you just cant expect them to do it all at once..

So we started with a long 40ft line to get him used to the idea of coming back and his new name.. If treats dont motivate, and Im not talking dry old kibble but cheese, roast chicken or hot dog then maybe a toy or other special thing..
With Remy it was chicken so I would call his name say 'here' and give a slight tug on the line to let him know I wanted him to move... as soon as he started to move towards me I would start with the praise.. and as soon as he was within arms length treat..

Gradually we stopped the tug so just said 'Remy here'.. he would come, I reduced the length at which he would get a treat so he had to touch me to get it. Then eventually when he would happily come to me (and you see in their eyes when they are happy to do so) we dared letting him off lead..
We did our first release in an enclosed field and practised there for several weeks continuing with very special treats before going to the next stage of letting him loose in the woods.

It takes time so relax and dont expect too much too soon...
 

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There are a few important things you should know:

1. You should never let a new-to-you dog off leash.
2. You should never let a dog off leash until you know that dog has a rock-solid recall.
3. Many huskies will never be good off-leash candidates due to their high prey drive, the fact that they were bred to run, and the fact that they tend to have a mind of their own and are less concerned with pleasing you than breeds like a golden or a lab.

Do not let this dog off leash again until you are as close to 100% certain as you can be that the dog will come to you when you call. That may be never, and that's fine. Get a long, lightweight leash or take the dog to fenced areas where he can run.

I apologize if you're already keeping him on leash while outside and he's getting loose because he's door-dashing and escaping the house. If that's what's happening, let us know and we can offer some training and management tips.
 

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Huskies are notorious runaways and escape artists. It's still worth working on recall, but you need to have a good "containment system" and accept the possibility that he may never be the kind of dog that can be off-leash in an unfenced area.

I wouldn't assume he's running home or anything like that. Huskies just run. They've been bred to run fast in a straight line for a long time. That's useful when hitched to a dogsled with a driver but not so useful when the dog is loose. Trying to stop them running is like trying to stop a bloodhound from snuffling.

Is he a door dasher? That IS something that can be really improved with training.
 

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Is this your first husky? I mean no offense but it seems like it. They are a different breed and not the right pet for most people. That isn’t directed at you in any way, just a general rule. Some huskies can be trained to be off leash. Many, many will never be off leash dogs. It isn’t anxiety or boredom or stress, it’s just what they are - runners. It is a very smart, independent breed that’s good at figuring things out and escaping. Most rescues specializing in huskies won’t adopt out to a home without a fence for that reason. From what you’ve said, I would recommend going out and getting a radio radius collar and spending the time on training the boundary of your yard. This is not the same as the underground invisible fence. Unfortunately for a dog whose greatest motivation and reward is getting away and sniffing everything while playing chase with you, there is no other training reward that will work - especially after 6 years of tasting freedom. Aversives are probably going to be your only choice.
 

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Huskies are master escape artists! I would keep him on a long line whenever he is in the backyard, keep him tied to something. If he is slipping out of his harness/collar, try a martigale. It will tighten so your dog can't slip out, but not enough to choke them. If you are open to the idea, Maybe try a e-collar? I love the mini educator, or the sport dog brand. This video is also super helpful! This dog (Voodoo) is a service dog, so her handler really knows what she's doing!
. I feel like once you form more of a bond with your dog, He will become easier to train.. I would also suggest some sort of sport, such as bikejoring, agility, flyball, ect. This will give your dog the running release he desires, While still contained.
Also, My Aunt had a husky named Kodiak! He was also a escape artist! She had to give him away, because his energy was too much and she was pregnant at the time of owning him. He went to a wonderful home though. They also had a Labrador named Raleigh, They really LOVE alaska
 

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Do not electrically shock your pet rescue dog for doing a manageable, typical dog behavior. If someone is thinking they need electric shocks to teach normal pet dogs normal pet dog commands, they should put that collar around their own neck and zap themselves until the urge passes.

I did this protocol with my own runaway (our local training session did a series of classes on it) and it worked really well: Enjoy dog training success with Recallers! Might be harder with a husky given that they've often got a very strong urge to roam, but the techniques are worth a try. If you can't do the class for whatever reason, pretty much all the techniques she uses in the course are out there and available for a good internet searcher, it's just put together very coherently and effectively in the actual class.
 

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Congratulations to you. 4 days is ways too early to listen to or trust you, plus Huskies are known escape artists. That’s why there’s so many for adoption. There are memes and jokes all over the internet about huskies escaping.
join The Husky Owners group on Facebook.
They need plenty of exercise and mental stimulation.He should never, ever be off leash or in the yard unattended. He should have a collar with phone number embroidered on him 100% of the time and a current microchip with your current info.
I would highly recommend using two leashes, one attached to collar and another attached to a harness when walking him.
I’d also highly recommend a positive reinforcement training class to bond with you guys.
Good luck to you. You got this.
 

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