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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys! Second post here.
One of my old friends was walking down the road today, being absolutely dragged by their new Great Dane / Lab mix. They asked me if I knew any methods of solving the issue. I walked around the block with him, and lord have mercy, this was the strongest, most impulsive puppy you’ve seen. It took the three of us to drahim back from some cats.

So, I suppose my question is, how in the world can I help them. I suggested a Gentle Leader, was that a good idea?

Keep in mind, this is a big dog, and some small kids.
 

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With a dog that large, yes, some sort of aide to keep him from pulling so hard is usually necessary, unless you're a very strong person and have no trouble controlling such a large, strong dog!

Aides are not a substitute for good loose leash walking training, though. They should have course continue to train loose leash walking, and perhaps a strong "leave it" to keep him off those cat, ha!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
With a dog that large, yes, some sort of aide to keep him from pulling so hard is usually necessary, unless you're a very strong person and have no trouble controlling such a large, strong dog!

Aides are not a substitute for good loose leash walking training, though. They should have course continue to train loose leash walking, and perhaps a strong "leave it" to keep him off those cat, ha!
Oh yeah, 100%! I’ve got them coming over again at 6 o’clock to work on that sort of training. I think we’ll have to get his impulses down before he stops pulling. Leave it games for Zeus!
Since I doubt they’ll have the head collar tomorrow, are there any other ways to deal with that sort of pulling? We can handle it, but it’s certainly a task to do!
 

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Treats, mostly. Really great treats. But, if the dog wants to take off after something more than he wants those treats, that's what I would be worried about. Do they have a harness laying around they can front flip too? If it was a smaller dog I would say just tough it out and hold the dog, but a dog that size...oofta. It could hurt somebody.

I don't know of anything quick and homemade that would work. At least nothing that actually works or is safe and won't cause injury to the dog. Maybe someone else has an idea.
 

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Getting physical control with either a front clip harness or head collar (although the dog needs to be conditioned to the head collar) is an important first step. Beyond that, there are quite a few ways to teach loose leash walking.

I know of a couple of paid resources that would probably be helpful. The Fenzi Dog Sports Academy has an on demand video that covers various methods Fenzi Dog Sports Academy - LS140: Stop Leash Pulling: Multiple Methods to Loose Leash Walking as well as a self study class that is a compilation of three webinars that covers a completely different method Fenzi Dog Sports Academy - EW100: Reducing Overarousal and Reactivity via the Circle Method of Leash Walking

If you prefer something free, then Kikopup on YouTube probably has some videos. https://www.youtube.com/user/kikopup
 
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clicker training
prong collar, properly sized to the dog
short , stout leash like mycicy short dog leash - 18 inch rope traffic leash with padded handle
work on ¨Heel¨ with the short leash, the cliker and really tasty treat.. baked chicken breast, liverwurst, peanut butter

AND I bet the dog would use a bunch more exercise

Luck,
Uncle Foster

Funny, and true story from years ago when we had our first two dogs.
Both girls loved peanut butter so of course we had two jars of peanut butter, one for humans, one for canines.
Our good friend came to stay for a few days. He spotted the red jar of peanut butter (dogs). We told him to use the blue jar (humans)
 

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Start with a positive based training class. Just putting a halti, harness, prong collar, etc will not teach a dog to heel. Think of all the times you've seen a large dog dragging its owner down the street while wearing a prong collar? The dog just became accustomed to the pain of the collar and continued on his xisting behavioral path.

A good training class will teach your friends how to encourage proper walking behavior. It will focus on using positive tools rather than punishment.

It will also build the bond between owner and dog which will make training that much easier.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
clicker training
prong collar, properly sized to the dog
short , stout leash like mycicy short dog leash - 18 inch rope traffic leash with padded handle
work on ¨Heel¨ with the short leash, the cliker and really tasty treat.. baked chicken breast, liverwurst, peanut butter

AND I bet the dog would use a bunch more exercise

Luck,
Uncle Foster
Start with a positive based training class. Just putting a halti, harness, prong collar, etc will not teach a dog to heel. Think of all the times you've seen a large dog dragging its owner down the street while wearing a prong collar? The dog just became accustomed to the pain of the collar and continued on his xisting behavioral path.

A good training class will teach your friends how to encourage proper walking behavior. It will focus on using positive tools rather than punishment.

It will also build the bond between owner and dog which will make training that much easier.
I agree with the exercise portion! I seriously doubt this dog is getting the attention it needs.

As for the tools, I can’t really bring myself to recommend them a prong collar. While I’m not totally against their use, it’s the fact that I’m certain they’ll be misused that concerns me.
I also didn’t go for the halti as a training tool! It’s specifically so that they can control the dog if need be. Using it has been going smoothly for them.

I’m using a tecnique with them that’s both R+ and P+ with them. So far— it’s working! We’re not going for a perfect heel, just a general “be at my side”, and so far, we’ve gotten pretty close to it.
 

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Sounds like you are making steady progress. To me the main thing is teaching them how to interact properly with the dog.

I only used a halti once. I took in a dog who had been severely abused and had been dragged by a collar and leash. When she came, any pressure on her neck sent her into a rage. And trying to put a leash on her was dangerous. I ended up holding the leash up and letting her attack it. After about 10 minutes, she'd relax so I could attach it. I used the halti so that my directing her was not connected to her neck. She had no problem with her nose being turned. It took about a year before she overcame her leash fear completely and no longer needed to "kill it" first. And the halti helped in her old age when she went blind.
 
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