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What does this mean for my 28 week old puppy whose leg hair fell out at the rabies injection site?
OMG, that vaccine should be reported The original poster to this information can help you. There is another question like yours on previous page here and the website to report it is there. I am so sorry that happened to you. We have to speak out for these animals, they depend on us to protect them.
 

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Discussion Starter #23
What does this mean for my 28 week old puppy whose leg hair fell out at the rabies injection site?
Not sure what your question is, but you should make sure that your veterinarian recorded your puppy's reaction and that you report it (information on how to do that below).

It could be that your puppy suffered an ischemic skin reaction to the rabies vaccine. The following links will take you to more information: World Small Animal Veterinary Association 2006 Congress Ischemic Skin Disease in the Dog http://www.vin.com/proceedings/Proceedings.plx?CID=WSAVA2006&PID=15765&O=Generic

World Small Animal Veterinary Association 2004 World Congress Cutaneous Vasculitis and Vasculopathy
http://www.vin.com/proceedings/Proceedings.plx?CID=WSAVA2004&PID=8602&O=Generic

Reporting an Adverse Reaction:

The American Veterinary Medical Association Reporting Adverse Events Advice for Animal Owners https://www.avma.org/KB/Resources/Reference/Pages/Reporting-Adverse-Events.aspx

FDA Veterinary Adverse Drug Reaction Report form http://www.fda.gov/downloads/AboutFDA/ReportsManualsForms/Forms/AnimalDrugForms/ucm048817.pdf
More reporting information and options from the USDA: http://www.aphis.usda.gov/animal_health/vet_biologics/vb_adverse_event.shtml
 

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I lost my Meadow to a mast cell cancer which started at the site of the rabies booster he had at 5 years old. It cuts deep.
I am so so sorry for your loss Ashl67ey. I too lost my dear Ingrid to Mast cell which I first noticed at 8 years old with a tiny pink "wart" on her foot, At 12 they were treating her for arthritis, which she did not have. They did not do xrays, just assumed. When she broke her leg they xrayed her and found the mast cell had spread all through her bones, (which is why she had trouble walking) she was in such pain, it still cuts me too, June 15 will be one year ago I had to euthanize an otherwise alert and happy dog. My baby.
I will pray for God to give you the strength to withstand the emotions of this sorrow.
 

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Lots of vets are adhering to the newer guidelines for vaccination protocols - which is a 'less is more' type of thing. If you aren't happy with your vet's vaccine protocol I'd advise finding a new vet. The veterinarians I work for are by far the best and most careful I have worked for. Working the field, I know first hand the importance of vaccinations - there is a reason that they are important, and should be given, BUT they should not be over-given. That is where the trouble lies.

After the puppy series we do annual 5-in-1 (Distemper/Parvo) until 5 years old, and then every three years (although we've just started talking about starting the three year protocol after the first annual booster which will be cool).

We do Rabies 1 year and then every 3 years - that IS required by law in most states, and believe me you DO NOT want to mess with that one of the off chance your dog does bite someone.

And cats we do three year FVRCP vaccines after their kitten series, and don't do Leukemia (Purevax!!) at all unless they ROAM outdoors. We only do Rabies (Purevax!!) on indoor cats, if they are likely to bite anyone (again because of legal reasons).

We only do Bordetella as needed (as in if they board and it's required by the kennel, or if they go FREQUENTLY to the dog park), otherwise we advise against it. We do not vaccinate dogs with immune-mediated issues.

We always split vaccines up (have people come back in 3-4 weeks for a NO CHARGE exam) to avoid reactions, and we pre-treat reactive patients (and sometimes dachshunds even if they haven't had a reaction - because they can be hyper-sensitive to vaccine reactions) as needed (and at NO CHARGE).


Believe me, I worked for a couple of other vets that gave all three vaccines at once, gave all vaccines every year, and worse...you have to find a vet that you feel comfortable with. A good vet should not be about the money, but about the health and safety of your pet. For me, I had to find a vet I could trust to work for (and bring my pets too), but you should be just as picky bringing your pets to the vet as well. If they don't do what's best for you and your pet, then find a better one.
 

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A helpful recent review of these guidelines can be found at the skeptvet blog (a vet promoting evidence-based veterinary medicine):

http://skeptvet.com/Blog/2014/08/routine-vaccinations-for-dogs-cats-trying-to-make-evidence-based-decisions/

One bit in this review that I hadn't seen before is advice not to give parvo vaccine to old dogs:

Given the length of protection, and some evidence that susceptibility to parvovirus is low in older dogs, most probably do not need to be vaccinated after about 8-10 years of age. There is clear evidence that older dogs do respond appropriately to vaccinations, and there is not evidence that they are more likely to be harmed by vaccines than younger dogs, so continuing to vaccinate after this age is not likely to be harmful, but it is probably unnecessary. In humans, there is evidence that older people may be more susceptible to some diseases than younger adults, and thus may be more in need of vaccination, but this hasn’t yet been demonstrated in dogs.
 
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