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We must be crazy. But we are taking a road trip down south to visit a friend next month and in the interest in saving money by not boarding them for the week we're taking them along with us.

Basically my two dogs we have Chloe (Hound, Pointer, Dalmation mix) and Clancey (black lab beagle mix) they are both fairly young (year and 1/2 or so each) and have lots of energy. I'm wondering how they will fare with such a long trip. Of course we will make plenty of stops along the way for potty breaks and for them to stretch their legs. Has anyone had any experience with long road trips like this?

Also my 2nd question....we are camping for three days and will be tying them both up to runs when we're all hanging out at the campsite. Chloe is notorious for slipping her collar (it's the hound "supermodel" body she's got...lol...long and lanky) I was thinking of putting them both in a harness when they're hitched up...is this okay to do?

THOUGHTS??? Thanks!
 

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I drove with 2 dogs from Arizona to New York (when we moved last winter) it was a 4 day trip. My only suggestion is lots of potty breaks and to bring water from home...mine wouldn't drink water from the motels (Motel 6 has an awesome pet policy!) so they were a little stressed by the time we got up here.

I think a harness is a good idea, as long as they are supervised and can't get tangled up, since a harness won't slide around the neck to help untangle a snag...other than that, good luck on your trip!
 

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We drove 13 hours to Texas last year with both shelties...they were about a year old at the time. It was ok, we stopped alot and brought along lots of chew things. We also brought bottled water, they did seem a little stressed, but once we were there they were fine. We stayed at La Quinta, it was pretty nice and the dogs behaved in the hotel...we did bring crates though.
 

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Everyone's suggestions are great. I would be sure to bring along comfy towels/blankets that they can "nest" in. Stop every two hours to stretch legs. Water, special snacks, dinner at usual time. They will be happiest being with you, and once they get used to traveling, they will settle right in. You won't be able to pack a suitcase from now on without them wanting to come along too!

The harness sounds like a good idea, but we have never used one. Anyone else have more feedback on that idea?
 

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I once drove from Washington State to the Florida panhandle by myself with 3GSD's. We had a 2 day stop in Texas. We actually had fun making lots of stops along the way to check out the trails. I did use Rescue Remedy for the dogs when we stayed in hotels. All in all it was pretty much a problem free trip. The fact that my dogs were very well trained made all the difference in the world. Plus they had traveled with me before on several occasions from state to state.

Jihad
and the pound puppy crew.
 

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I haven't had any experience with long trips, but whenever my puppy's in the car he's a good boy. As for harnesses, my boy always wears a harness and there's nothing wrong with it. I like it a lot better than a collar, it seems to me to be more secure and I could imagine that it hurts less to wear instead of having to be tugged by the neck haha.
 

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I will be doing the same in a few months from NY to to SC for a vacation; around 16 hours. Can't wait!!! To try and ease the pain for Benjamin (son) and Toby (dog), we'll be leaving around 8pm and driving through the night so hopefully they can both sleep a majority of the way.
 

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To try and ease the pain for Benjamin (son) and Toby (dog), we'll be leaving around 8pm and driving through the night so hopefully they can both sleep a majority of the way.
Oooo...I hated it the times I've tried to drive all night...depending on how old your son is...we tried this a couple times when the kids were very young, and we arrived in the morning completely exhausted and wanting to sleep, while the kids were wide awake and ready to do stuff...I imagine it would be the same for dogs...just had to throw that out there...it helps though if you are traveling to see family that is willing to help out while you nap.
 

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I prefer to drive at night when less traffic and miss "rush hour" time when we have to go through cities. So we try to plan that to make for quicker time and easier on the dogs and us. I've done over 24hr drives with mine. Most of the time they just sleep, even "hyper" ones. They are either crated or loose in the car depending on the situation. We make stops for potty, drink, and food. We also try to walk them out a bit at potty time so they can stretch their legs too. Most of the time everything goes smoothly though. A harness would be ok at long as your dog won't fine a way to slip out or chew out. If its properly fitted and adjusted it will be harder to wiggle out but some dogs are great Houdinis. I'd just keep an eye on her of course.
 

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I will be doing the same in a few months from NY to to SC for a vacation; around 16 hours. Can't wait!!! To try and ease the pain for Benjamin (son) and Toby (dog), we'll be leaving around 8pm and driving through the night so hopefully they can both sleep a majority of the way.
Watch out for the crazy truck drivers. The ones that are driving during the night hours are the crazy ones. I had seen first hand how nuts they are, driving at higher rates of speed than they should be, driving at high speeds through fog so thick that you could not see 10' in front of you.

One time I had to travel from NC to SC, usually about a five hour trip but being there was an ice storm I left about 1am. I am driving along doing 35 and a tractor trailer nut job drove by me in the fast lane going at least 60. A few miles down the road I seen a small group of people on the side of the road. Next to them was the tractor trailer that had passed me a few minutes before flipped and down the embankment.

I got to where I needed to go, he did not. If you are traveling at night your better off going a little slower and staying in the right hand lane. Let the crazy's pass on the left and keep an eye on the shoulder as some of the crazy's like to pass on the right.

To keep this on topic: Don't forget the dog toys and treats :)
 

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1. Try to make stops to coinicide with gas stops only if possible. Think about it you fill up car and then stop 2 hrs later the dogs are up all rowdy etc then back in and it takes time to calm down. They will travel better with less stops less excitement etc. When you do stop for gas the whole car people etc will raise a ruckus so that's good time for outing. When on training trips I never had a truck with less than 2 tanks as that meant I could go 7-8 hrs without a stop. The hum of the road knocks the dog out and trip has less events. These are young dogs and stretching their legs etc is not necessary. Also if your dogs do not have reliable recalls their is less chance of problems if Murphy's Law strikes and a dog gets loose.
2. I'm not a harness person as many dogs are able to chew through their harnesses, I would prefer a proper fitting martingale collar that when fitted properly the dog cannot back out of it and choking is not an option.They also can't be chewed by dogs.
3. When at camp I also preferred chain tieouts as they also are chew proof. You can pick up chain and dogsnaps an chain links to attach everything from any hardware store. I do not like the screw in stakes that they sell at pet stores as dogs if tangled can actually screw them out of the ground etc.
4. You know your dogs and their needs better than anybody here so some or most of what I have posted may not be necessary at all for your dogs. I just like to confuse people. When I made these training(bird-dog) trips people would frown if I did not bring all dogs back to owners so I was very paranoid.
 

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I had the unfortunate situation of having to drive home for a family funeral when I'd only had my pup Winston for about a month and a half. He was getting close to 4 months at the time, and his only car experience prior had been about 45 minutes taking him home from the breeder. Going home for the funeral also meant going home for the school break, but instead of being able to break it up ino shorter stintsl ike I'd originally planned I had to do the 14 hour drive in one overnight stretch.

What I did for Winston initially was set up an area in the back with his most familiar pillow and blankets, some of my dirty laundry to give him some of my scent for comfort, some of his toys, and barriers keeping the area enclosed.However, he still threw up a few times at the start of the trip and found it quite stressful. Crossing the border into the states, my car was searched and we were held up for over an hour, further stressing him. From there, Ilet him ride shotgun and tried to keep a hand on him whenever driving conditions allowed, this calmed him alot and helped him with the drive.

Over the course of the break due to the family situation I had to spend alot of time in the car with him, and I found nothing did a better job of keeping him calm than either having him next to me whe possible or if the car was full, for him to be sitting with someone he trusted. We would stop for walks usually at the same time as gas, but he tended not to eat when travelling.
I also used a harness as a safety measure in case of a crash, he never struggled with it or tried to get out so I never encountered that problem.

After a few longer drives, he's now fine in the car and relaxes quite nicely as the road gets going, I really think it's just the getting accustomed to it thats an issue. I wish you luck on your trip!
 

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This past September we drove with the dogs up to Seattle and back, a 2 day trip in each direction. I have an SUV. We folded down as many seats as possible to give them lots of room. Toby can get cranky when he's crowded. Then we set up the luggage so that they almost had 2 different areas to lie down in. We also took the blankets that they sleep on so they had familiar smells.

We stayed one night in a hotel (Best Western). We put their blankets on the floor of the hotel room to make them more comfortable. They did fine.

We stopped about every 3-4 hours at freeway rest stops to walk them. A lot of the rest stops have dog areas. This worked fine for us. The driving time was probably about an hour longer in each direction overall. But my back was happier for the stops.

Just for grins... you can make a cheap, simple, nonspill water dish for the dogs that can live in the car. Get a large Tupperware dish with a lid. Cut out a hole in the lid big enough for the dogs to drink through but leave about an inch lip all of the way around. It works great and costs less than $10.
 

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I made the trip from Massachusetts to Texas by myself with 2 GSDs. I went 12 hours the first day and 17 hours the 2nd day.

The dogs slept most of the way, but when I had to stop for gas, I also found a spot to let them out, run around, eat, take care of business and get a drink. Once they were back in the car, they settled down quickly and were quiet until the next gas stop.

I brought about 15 gallons of bottled water with me. That way, they weren't getting different water at every stop which could upset their stomachs and cause some bathroom issues. Once I was at my destination, the water I had left over I mixed with the local water to transition them slowly.

My car was packed and they only had the backseat to relax in but I made it as comfy as possible and they didn't seem to mind.

As for the harnesses, that sounds like a good idea since you've got an escape artist with you.

Good Luck. It will be fine. :D
 

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I drove from Ky to Ca last year with 6 dogs a 3 day trip lol it was hmmm interesting.

But overall it wasn't too hard just had to make more stops they mostly slept and chewed on toys the whole way there.

2 of mine are escape artists when we go camping I would definitely use a harness before I would use a collar.
 

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I don't have any advice about the long ride, but I use harnesses only with Chloe. Just be very careful, and get them used to them beforehand as they CAN slip out of them. I have tried 4 brands, and even had one custom made to her measurements and she is able to slip out of each one if she wants to.

Thankfully she was trained well to walk on a leash, so she doesn't back out of them now, but it happened twice to me during walks (if she was spooked, if I turned quick to get her to follow me, etc). Just picture a stopped dog, and a human who keeps walking, pulling the dog who is firmly planted to the ground - they shrink a little towards the ground and just back out of the harness.

Don't get me wrong, I like them a lot better than collars for my breed, just be sure they are accustomed to them and they fit well. We use the good old nylon ones from Petco for our regular walks, and they are about $15.

Good luck!
 

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i traveled 16 hrs to GA and back last April w/ 4 dogs, 2 of which were 4 mo old pups.....they all did great.....as for the harness/collar, maybe use a martingale collar or an anti-slip harness....that way, if she pulls it will tighten and she can't back out of it.....make sure the martingale (or half check) collar is snug enuff to not come off her neck when she backs up.....
 

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I've made trips of 2,400 miles by myself with two dogs and 4 cats without a hitch. Of course, my idea of "roughing it" is a motel room without room service; never camped out with dogs. I drove by myself with a dog from FL to MN (1,800 + miles) non-stop, only stops to eat, drink, and potty. No problems. I also made a trip from AZ to FL with a 5 month old puppy (Maddy), and two cats. Because the cats were old, we stayed in motels along the way, so they could eat, drink, and eliminate in peace. Maddy slept most of the way.

I would time the potty breaks with getting gas.
 
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