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Discussion Starter #1
I have had many conversation with my 10 year old, but it seems that every time she is around our puppy she gets him really excited and he begins to grow, bite and chase her.
She will stand like a tree to stop but then start running to get him to chase him.
I don't want our puppy to grow into an aggressive dog.
Any suggestions on how to teach her and him to get along nicely? Should she leave the room for a few minutes if he begins to growl and bite?
 

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It is natural for her to want to play with your puppy. What games would you like her to play?

I adopted a young dog when my son was 11. I was extremely concerned about chase and grab too. I allowed him run around but with a toy in his hand so she would grab that rather than clothing or worse. Worked great, they were best friends.
 

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All that behavior is fairly normal for a puppy, especially when riled up. To be honest, it’s not the puppy’s behavior you’ll want to focus on- it’s your child’s. You may find that she responds better to your talks if you explain to her why you don’t want her riling the pup up, and including her in training. This gives her a structured, and beneficial way, to interact with the pup!

Playful growls and nips are alright. They’re not an indication of an aggressive animal. Dogs naturally interact like this when playing with other dogs. The issue is, these nips (while well-meaning) can hurt us humans who are much more sensitive to their teeth. This is why it’s important that you teach your pup when they’ve gone too far. You should also teach them that doing this is appropriate only when the human initiates it, and is okay with it. With proper structure and training, dogs can be taught when playing is appropriate, and how rough they can be. It all comes down to training him, and showing your daughter how to interact properly. Good luck with them! Try not let them run you ragged!
 

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I'm dealing with a 15 week old sheep shark right now and two little girls. You have to supervise them all the time and work with both the kids and the dog. It is starting to let up slightly, almost getting to normal puppy levels/I haven't bled in a week or two... Generally they wont completely stop until they get their adult teeth. You have to manage the situation by giving the kids rules (so the dog doesn't develop the bad habits and so that nobody gets hurt) while you build impulse control in your dog and wait out the adult teeth. Some stuff I do:

- Make the dog stay and have the kids run around, closer and closer (dog is good at this but I have to get her attention w/ high value treats before the chase begins).

- Encourage the kids to chase the dog for a toy and not let her chase them (but not in conjunction with fetch, cause I don't want to ruin her retrieve).

- Structured kid chasing where the kids drag an exciting toy on a line around the yard and the dog nips at the toy instead of them (doing this at the end of "stay and don't chase" training)

- Stand between the kids and the dog when she tries to herd/nip/chase them

- Carry her to time out if she's outside and nips (I usually give her one 'No!' but repeat offenses are straight off to detention)

- Stand up and walk away if she takes indoor horseplay too far

- Substitute a chew when she gnaws my hand

- Free kibble for licking the kids (licking is what they replace biting with a lot of times... actually working with the little one but the older one brings too much energy to the table)

My dog isn't phased by the yelp/ouch stuff ("he yelps like livestock maybe he will move like livestock"), physical correction just makes her want to go harder and she won't be ignored (she'll find a soft spot).
 

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She needs to get up and leave. My kids (9 when we got our last puppy) really HATED the nippy stage. But we got consistent about getting up and ignoring her when she nipped and she got much better about it (I did let her chew softly on my hand though, but got up and left when she was too rough).

I agree with encouraging her to play with toys with your puppy instead of rough play.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
thank you for all the suggestions. will try them all. Going to tell my 10 year old the rules and to make sure she has a toy with her. I supervise their play all the time so will make sure i have some kibble on hand to praise when he begins to lick instead of nipping.
 

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That's not really aggressive, that's just normal puppy play. Dogs do grow when they play, and puppies bite because they don't know that they can't do that with humans!

I agree with others, have your daughter carry a toy if she wants to play with the dog. I would suggest a long braided fleece rope, perhaps a ball on a rope, something that will ensure the dog's teeth stay away from your daughter's flesh! You can still play chase, just try to encourage the pup to bite the rope instead of the kid. Think like when you play with a cat with a flirt pole.

I would also suggest placing baby gates or exercise pens around your home. When the puppy gets too rowdy with your daughter, have her step behind a baby gate, close a door, whatever, she should just withdraw attention from the dog for 5-10 minutes so puppy learns that nipping and biting lead to an end of fun.
 

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thank you for all the suggestions. will try them all. Going to tell my 10 year old the rules and to make sure she has a toy with her. I supervise their play all the time so will make sure i have some kibble on hand to praise when he begins to lick instead of nipping.
No prob. FYI you can fill a bag with kibble (and a few smelly dry treats for bonus/randomness) and carry it around all day for what trainers call 'shaping', it should just come out of their normal daily ration. Whenever the dog is doing something you like (laying in the right spot, following you around the yard, sitting nice in the kitchen, just being calm and attentive, or in my case licking on the kids) you can toss them one. They need to learn what behaviors you like to see (not just the ones you don't want to see) and this helps them to identify them. My dog will leave a bunch of food in her bowl but takes 'shapies' all day. Just be careful not to reward any bad behaviors.
 
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