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Discussion Starter #21
Also, in any of your guy’s opinions, when she’s older because of her breed would I ever be able to trust her and the cats in the house alone? Like if we go get groceries, should I always put her in a crate and never trust her alone with them?
 

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Youve already been given given info from a malamute/ cattle dog owner. Such beautiful loyal intelligent breeds shouldnt be seen as monsters that might attack your daughter. Cattle dogs are an incredible loyal breed to those who respect the breed otherwise your best to rehome the poor pup
 

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Discussion Starter #24
I do respect our dog, I love our dog, but I also really love my cats, and I’m not too worried about our dog hurting our daughter because I doubt she’ll kill my kid when she’s older, but she could definitely kill the cats
 

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Youve already been given given info from a malamute/ cattle dog owner. Such beautiful loyal intelligent breeds shouldnt be seen as monsters that might attack your daughter. Cattle dogs are an incredible loyal breed to those who respect the breed otherwise your best to rehome the poor pup
The only dog I've ever been outright attacked by was an ACD. I certainly don't judge all ACDs based on that individual - that dog clearly had issues - but they are not a breed of magical angel fairy princesses, either. There are breeds that are naturally meeker than others, and ACDs aren't a particularly mellow and meek breed. Neither are huskies. Any sizeable dog can hurt someone if something goes wrong, and children are extra vulnerable. It's responsible to take precautions with a dog around a child, even a sweet and trustworthy reliable dog, but moreso with dogs that are unknown quantities, which all pups are by definition. I wouldn't live in paranoia by any means, but it's good to have safe habits. (And if consistent safe habits aren't an option for some reason, then it's not a good idea to have a dog.)
Here's a good article (scroll down, there's a broken image at the top, at least for me) about keeping kids safe around dogs: Kids and Dogs: How Kids Should and Should Not Interact with Dogs
 

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Discussion Starter #27
What are the parents like?
Why did you choose this dog?
Well we found someone that was really trying to get rid of her because they realized they didn’t want a puppy, and we had already been looking for a dog/puppy for weeks until we found these people, and the people said the mom is a very sweet and smart full blood husky And the dad is a husky/blue heeler mix, so we’re thinking this puppy should have more husky than heeler, but personality wise on the parents other than them saying the mom is sweet, I’m not sure, we chose her because we figured since she’s a puppy we could raise her with our 2 cats and toddler and she would be fine, but then people started saying stuff to me about prey drives and breeds and I got freaked out, like it won’t matter if she’s raised with them,
 

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Youve already been given given info from a malamute/ cattle dog owner. Such beautiful loyal intelligent breeds shouldn't be seen as monsters that might attack your daughter. Cattle dogs are an incredible loyal breed to those who respect the breed otherwise your best to rehome the poor pup
Saw your previous post, great that you have a lovely dog. But it is irresponsible to make absolute statements like "Don't worry your cat is safe." The OP's dog is not a clone of your dog just because their breed makeup may be the same. Heck, I know dogs of the same breed, from the same litters, that have drastically different temperaments. Also, not that this matters one bit but huskies and malamutes are VERY different dogs.

OP, the best thing that you can do right now is focus on good socialization, training, and management practices. Parus' post is great. No one on this forum, and not even a reputable trainer, can guarantee that your pup will grow up to be safe around cats. You can increase the chances that this happens for sure! And the chances are very, very high that you can have a happy family with your dog, cat, and child. But that happy picture may involve SOME form of separation like crating the dog when you go shopping. Or... it may not! I totally understand that it would be a dealbreaker if your dog grew up to be the kind that wanted to harm cats. But would it be a dealbreaker if you had to work a little harder than some owners to prevent that outcome? Also, it doesn't matter what % of which breed your pup is. Mutts don't have X% phenotype and behavior from one parent and X% from the other. The parentage can suggest some things but nothing is absolute. Like if both parents have histories of hunting feral cats, there is a large chance your dog may be very interested in hunting cats. But just because both parents don't hunt cats, doesn't guarantee the pups would never harm a cat. Also, since you didn't directly meet the parents and it sounds like a random/accidental breeding, it's hard to say. Both parents 'being very sweet' tells me almost nothing about how those dogs function in the world.

My posts are long because I'm trying to help you see that this situation is not black and white. But I do think, and hope, that you should take a step back and enjoy your puppy. Absolutely work on normal puppy training - teach her to enjoy being confined or alone, teach her to bite and play with appropriate toys, socialize her, work on positive reinforcement training... And chances are things will be fine! But if you start seeing intense prey behaviors as she matures, it won't be a problem if you had that training and a variety of fail-safes to fall back on.
 

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but then people started saying stuff to me about prey drives and breeds and I got freaked out, like it won’t matter if she’s raised with them,
It matters a LOT that your puppy is being raised with your child and cats. It seriously increases the chances that she will grow up to be safe and happy around them. But what most people are saying is that it doesn't guarantee that your puppy will never, ever harm them. That holds true for every single dog in the world.
 

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Discussion Starter #30
It matters a LOT that your puppy is being raised with your child and cats. It seriously increases the chances that she will grow up to be safe and happy around them. But what most people are saying is that it doesn't guarantee that your puppy will never, ever harm them. That holds true for every single dog in the world.
Your posts made me feel SO SO SO much better, we’re definitely willing to try everything it takes, if our training sucks we’ll get a trainer, and she’s so far really great in a crate, So we can keep the crate when she’s an adult too, I understand now that there’s always the chance and anything can happen, I just tend to over think and get things stuck in my head and freak out over whatever thing, we’re also moving into a bigger home in 2 weeks and we’re getting these cat shelves that go up the wall so they can be high up and away any time they want, or they can go into the rooms, and she’s still a young puppy but she’s a sweet smart girl and already best pals with one of the cats, my other cat is Old and just sleeps all day away from the puppy and everyone so the puppy doesn’t seem to care much about him so far, but with how excited she gets and how much she plays with my younger cat It makes me think she’ll be just fine, and with my toddler we’re already in the process of teaching the puppy not to jump on her now since she’ll be bigger in a few months we want to stop the jumping before then, I’ll keep trying all the precautions I can do, thank you! 🙏🏻
 

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Saw your previous post, great that you have a lovely dog. But it is irresponsible to make absolute statements like "Don't worry your cat is safe." The OP's dog is not a clone of your dog just because their breed makeup may be the same. Heck, I know dogs of the same breed, from the same litters, that have drastically different temperaments. Also, not that this matters one bit but huskies and malamutes are VERY different dogs.

OP, the best thing that you can do right now is focus on good socialization, training, and management practices. Parus' post is great. No one on this forum, and not even a reputable trainer, can guarantee that your pup will grow up to be safe around cats. You can increase the chances that this happens for sure! And the chances are very, very high that you can have a happy family with your dog, cat, and child. But that happy picture may involve SOME form of separation like crating the dog when you go shopping. Or... it may not! I totally understand that it would be a dealbreaker if your dog grew up to be the kind that wanted to harm cats. But would it be a dealbreaker if you had to work a little harder than some owners to prevent that outcome? Also, it doesn't matter what % of which breed your pup is. Mutts don't have X% phenotype and behavior from one parent and X% from the other. The parentage can suggest some things but nothing is absolute. Like if both parents have histories of hunting feral cats, there is a large chance your dog may be very interested in hunting cats. But just because both parents don't hunt cats, doesn't guarantee the pups would never harm a cat. Also, since you didn't directly meet the parents and it sounds like a random/accidental breeding, it's hard to say. Both parents 'being very sweet' tells me almost nothing about how those dogs function in the world.

My posts are long because I'm trying to help you see that this situation is not black and white. But I do think, and hope, that you should take a step back and enjoy your puppy. Absolutely work on normal puppy training - teach her to enjoy being confined or alone, teach her to bite and play with appropriate toys, socialize her, work on positive reinforcement training... And chances are things will be fine! But if you start seeing intense prey behaviors as she matures, it won't be a problem if you had that training and a variety of fail-safes to fall back on.
In regards to your comment being very different breeds. Thats funny cause both alaskan malamutes and siberian huskies have equaly high prey drives. For you to state otherwise now thats irresponsible.

As for me stating dont worry your cats safe, it was a very quick post to try comfort the op to not panic and falsely assumed the op would've replied to that post and then i wouldve continued to express the very real risks and also comfort not every single high prey drive dog kills cats as the op was under the impression. So if me trying to be nice at first is irresponsible then so be it.
 

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I didn't say their prey drives were different, just that they are very different breeds - which is true. Though, yes, they have different level prey drives because it depends on what lines of huskies and what lines of malamutes are bred.

Dont worry your cats safe. I have a malamute/heeler/collie cross and a cat. I had my cat first. My dog has a high prey drive with small animals but is very respectful and 100% safe with my cat. Being a pup i can assure you you she will respect your cat growing up. This is from my perspective others can disagree if they wish.
I totally agree with being positive and reassuring. That said, writing "falsely assumed the op would've replied to that post and then i wouldve continued to express the very real risks" implies that giving well rounded advice was contingent on the OP directly replying to you? You literally said "I can assure you she will respect your cat growing up." There's a big difference between being nice and making absolute statements. I get that there are really no repercussions for any of us posting on a public forum. But in my job it could end it a lawsuit if I reassuringly said things like "I had a dog like yours. My dog was fine with cats. Therefore yours will be too." and then that dog went on to hurt a cat.
 
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Maddie, you are being proactive and doing your best to educate yourself. That already makes it much more likely that this situation will have a good outcome. I would say be prepared and be vigilant but don't worry, if that's not too tall an order, haha. The best way to stop dog problems is to prevent them in the first place!
 

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I didn't say their prey drives were different, just that they are very different breeds - which is true. Though, yes, they have different level prey drives because it depends on what lines of huskies and what lines of malamutes are bred.
Yeppers. I live in a part of the world where we're up to our butts in huskies and malamutes. Obviously dogs vary a lot as individuals, but my experience has been that mals in general are a lot less intense compared to huskies. Of course, pet and show bred huskies like you guys have down south are ridiculously mellow compared to most of the huskies I'm used to, haha.
 

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Lol! You have been taking my statements out of context. I never said YOUR statement would result in a lawsuit. I said if I made such claims in MY line of work, it could get me into trouble. Also, I never disrespected you - just provided some criticism about what you said. Criticizing what you say does not mean criticizing you as a person. Clearly, disagreeing with you raises some hackles. But I would gladly pet that cute little kitty's butt ;)
 

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Canyx and Parus have had great advice, @Maddiedalsing! Of course nothing is ever 100% when you're dealing with living animals with instincts, but it sounds like you're setting things up for success.

I like the idea of having lots of high spaces for the cat, and in your new place I'd suggest trying to set up a dog-free room or area if at all possible. Take advantage of their size difference, there's lots of options for gates that have bars wide enough for a cat to get through but not a medium/large dog - or even gates with a cat door included. We don't have a cat, but my in-laws use a gate to keep the dogs from being able to go upstairs unsupervised. Another important point - try to keep the litter box in an area where the dog can't bother it! This will help avoid litter box use problems due to stress on the cats' end, and prevent the dog from indulging in, uh, 'kittie crunchies' as we call them. Gross.
 

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My daughter has a cat - one with a full arsenal of teeth and claws - and a pit mix. The dog tries to initiate play and sometimes it gets to be too much for the cat.

They are close-enough to the same size and the dog can easily jump a five foot fence or gate, so we installed a series of carpeted floating shelves in two rooms so the cat always has some place to enjoy some peace and quiet. Her food dish is on one of the higher shelves to keep it away from the dog.

BTW, the cat cries if she's separated from the dog for more than a few hours, so the relationship is not exactly adversarial.
262851
 

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My .02 - I agree with Canyx. Most of the time when a dog hurts a cat it is due to prey drive, or resource guarding. Not all dogs are that serious about their food and toys, but it's something to watch out for - and usually something that can be easily managed. Feed separately, monitor toy time, etc.

My dog has had run in with cats due to the above two reasons. He lives with a cat successfully - but my cat doesn't run, therefore doesn't invoke a chase. And I do pay attention to food and toys to thwart any resource guarding.

I've watched a lot of Jackson Galaxy on Animal Planet and he's got some awesome tips. One of the things you might consider is the "cat superhighway" which is your attempt to utilize shelves and cat trees to allow your cat to not only get up high if needed, but to outright leave a room/situation without necessarily needing to touch the floor. It's nice too because your cat will then feel confident and empowered, and less likely to run and act like prey, and therefore is less likely to be chased by the dog (my dog only chases cats that run but of course that's a natural reaction for the cat!).

Huskies and Heelers can both be pretty intense, as you've been told. Puppy nipping is totally normal, and heelers are of course bred to nip so that is to be expected. Are you able to attend puppy classes? It might be helpful to have someone further show you what behaviors may be concerning, and what are totally normal and how to deal with those.

BTW, your puppy is super cute.
 

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Discussion Starter #39
My daughter has a cat - one with a full arsenal of teeth and claws - and a pit mix. The dog tries to initiate play and sometimes it gets to be too much for the cat.

They are close-enough to the same size and the dog can easily jump a five foot fence or gate, so we installed a series of carpeted floating shelves in two rooms so the cat always has some place to enjoy some peace and quiet. Her food dish is on one of the higher shelves to keep it away from the dog.

BTW, the cat cries if she's separated from the dog for more than a few hours, so the relationship is not exactly adversarial. View attachment 262851
Oh my gosh those shelves are awesome! I’ll show my husband! We are planning on doing shelves but haven’t looked into what kinds yet, these would be perfect, thank you for including a picture!
 

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My .02 - I agree with Canyx. Most of the time when a dog hurts a cat it is due to prey drive, or resource guarding. Not all dogs are that serious about their food and toys, but it's something to watch out for - and usually something that can be easily managed. Feed separately, monitor toy time, etc.

My dog has had run in with cats due to the above two reasons. He lives with a cat successfully - but my cat doesn't run, therefore doesn't invoke a chase. And I do pay attention to food and toys to thwart any resource guarding.

I've watched a lot of Jackson Galaxy on Animal Planet and he's got some awesome tips. One of the things you might consider is the "cat superhighway" which is your attempt to utilize shelves and cat trees to allow your cat to not only get up high if needed, but to outright leave a room/situation without necessarily needing to touch the floor. It's nice too because your cat will then feel confident and empowered, and less likely to run and act like prey, and therefore is less likely to be chased by the dog (my dog only chases cats that run but of course that's a natural reaction for the cat!).

Huskies and Heelers can both be pretty intense, as you've been told. Puppy nipping is totally normal, and heelers are of course bred to nip so that is to be expected. Are you able to attend puppy classes? It might be helpful to have someone further show you what behaviors may be concerning, and what are totally normal and how to deal with those.

BTW, your puppy is super cute.
Yes I’ve looked up the current classes going on In Tulsa and we will most likely be signed up for the next season classes, but in the meantime I’ve been looking up tons of training videos and trying to do everything I learned, and I always wear a fanny pack now with treats in it to be able to reward her anytime, lol
 
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