Norway's legalized owning reptiles!
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    Senior Member DaySleepers's Avatar
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    Norway's legalized owning reptiles!

    Well, certain species, anyhow. But most of the snakes and lizards I've been interested in keeping are on the list, so I'm excited! We don't have a great place to set up any reptiles in our current apartment, so it'll still likely be a year or two at least before we actually have any scaly family members, but I'm really pumped that we actually have that option now.

    Hopefully by then there will be more access to vets who know how to treat reptiles, as well. I wouldn't want to get a pet without knowing we have access to medical care in a reasonable distance.
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    Member FatherOfFlo's Avatar
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    Re: Norway's legalized owning reptiles!

    That's great. I used to have many reptiles and amphibians way back in my younger years. What were you thinking of getting? In my opinion turtles and tortoises are the most fun (and arguably most intelligent) reptiles I've seen or had. Box turtles are relatively easy to care for and live a long time and are great companions.

    Whatever reptile you get, make sure to invest your time and money into serious research, as well as sourcing all the best gear (terrarium, lighting, heating, misting equipment, etc).

    Check out ssnakess.com/forums/ which is IMO the best reptile forum on the internet. They can sort you out for any reptile you want.

    Please don't start out with difficult animals like green tree pythons or (all) chameleons. They are not for beginners, nor are the giant snakes like burmese pythons, or giant lizards like iguanas and monitors etc.

    Honestly I think the best beginner reptile of all time are bearded dragons. They are a hardy, medium sized, intelligent, very calm lizard.
    Make sure to lock down a constant source of crickets/cockroaches for them if you get one. Dubia roaches are the best food source and can be ordered online.
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    Senior Member DaySleepers's Avatar
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    Re: Norway's legalized owning reptiles!

    Haha, don't worry. I have Opinions about people getting herps they don't know how to handle, and a lot of the "difficult" species are still on the banned list, anyway (only 19 species are on the legal-to-own list so far). One of the reasons we're waiting is because we want to be sure we can have access to a herp-experienced vet, so a car at least is necessary in case we have to go to the big animal hospital the local zoo uses, rather than the local small animal clinic we take Sam to.

    The short list we're considering is corn snake, bearded dragon, or leopard gecko, so all relatively easy, hardy, and mild-mannered species. I'm happy to admire turtles and tortoises, and have met some lovely ones when living in the States, but between how big they grow, the space requirements for their habitats, and the fact that the climate isn't great for allowing them to have much, if any, seasonal access to an outdoor enclosure, I think they'll not be something we're ready for any time soon.

    A little bummed none of the skinks are on the list, because I've wanted a blue-tongued skink of some kind for years, but I'll live! Happy enough to have some nice options.
    Last edited by DaySleepers; 07-29-2017 at 07:47 AM.
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    Member FatherOfFlo's Avatar
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    Re: Norway's legalized owning reptiles!

    get the bearded dragon :P
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    Member FatherOfFlo's Avatar
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    Re: Norway's legalized owning reptiles!

    I was forced to re-home my reptiles when I moved in with my grandmother a decade and a half ago. It was either homelessness (with reptiles) or having a roof over my head and no reptiles. She refused to have anything with scales in her home.
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    Senior Member DaySleepers's Avatar
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    Re: Norway's legalized owning reptiles!

    The beardie is my wife's top pick! I'd love to have a leo again. Really love the little guys. We both like corn snakes, but we need a spare room to set up the tank or my FiL may never visit us again, haha!

    I'm sorry about your herps. I'm extremely grateful my (cat people) parents allowed me to keep Sam when I had to move back home for a couple years, but I certainly know how difficult making the choice between pets and a place to live can be. At least reptiles don't bond with their people the same way a lot of mammals and birds do, so a change of owner is less stressful on that level, but it still sucks when it has to happen.
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    Super Moderator Kuma'sMom's Avatar
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    Re: Norway's legalized owning reptiles!

    I'm so happy for you!! Corn snakes are awesome, just have to put a vote in there, lol. Why have reptiles not been allowed up until now?
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    Senior Member DaySleepers's Avatar
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    Re: Norway's legalized owning reptiles!

    I've heard a few reasons, all of which are kinda... idk.
    -To keep salmonella poisoning down (to be fair, the poultry industry here is very, very low in salmonella contamination, so this is the most valid reasoning imo)
    -To discourage people from collecting native reptiles from the wild (except the people who are going to do that are going to do it whether or not other herps are legal to keep)
    -Because released herps could threaten the ecosystem (fair... except this is Scandinavia, and I doubt most commonly kept herp species could survive long enough to threaten much of anything unlike, say, Florida)
    -Because herps are more difficult to care for than other pets and it presents a welfare issue (also fair, but there were estimates in the tens of thousands of illegally kept reptiles in the country before the ban was lifted, all of which the owners would have had difficulty accessing health care and possibly appropriate food/equipment for due to the ban)

    Basically, I think it started as more of a political issue, kinda like BSL, than anything based on a solid welfare or public health issue. The ban was in place for 30 or 40 years, though, so I feel like I had pretty good timing moving here, haha!
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    Re: Norway's legalized owning reptiles!

    Quote Originally Posted by DaySleepers View Post
    The beardie is my wife's top pick! I'd love to have a leo again. Really love the little guys. We both like corn snakes, but we need a spare room to set up the tank or my FiL may never visit us again, haha!

    I'm sorry about your herps. I'm extremely grateful my (cat people) parents allowed me to keep Sam when I had to move back home for a couple years, but I certainly know how difficult making the choice between pets and a place to live can be. At least reptiles don't bond with their people the same way a lot of mammals and birds do, so a change of owner is less stressful on that level, but it still sucks when it has to happen.
    One thing to consider if you get the cornsnake is a steady supply of frozen appropriately sized mice. Given that the reptile as a pet industry just came into existance in your country, a source may be difficult to find? I guess the same can be said for crickets or roaches.
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    Super Moderator Kuma'sMom's Avatar
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    Re: Norway's legalized owning reptiles!

    Quote Originally Posted by DaySleepers View Post
    I've heard a few reasons, all of which are kinda... idk.
    -To keep salmonella poisoning down (to be fair, the poultry industry here is very, very low in salmonella contamination, so this is the most valid reasoning imo)
    -To discourage people from collecting native reptiles from the wild (except the people who are going to do that are going to do it whether or not other herps are legal to keep)
    -Because released herps could threaten the ecosystem (fair... except this is Scandinavia, and I doubt most commonly kept herp species could survive long enough to threaten much of anything unlike, say, Florida)
    -Because herps are more difficult to care for than other pets and it presents a welfare issue (also fair, but there were estimates in the tens of thousands of illegally kept reptiles in the country before the ban was lifted, all of which the owners would have had difficulty accessing health care and possibly appropriate food/equipment for due to the ban)

    Basically, I think it started as more of a political issue, kinda like BSL, than anything based on a solid welfare or public health issue. The ban was in place for 30 or 40 years, though, so I feel like I had pretty good timing moving here, haha!
    Yeah, those are all BS reasons, I guarantee it's political.
    Salmonella: Unless someone handles a snake and then immediately goes to handle chicken and eggs without washing their hands, there's zero risk there.
    People collecting snakes from the wild: Most people have no clue how to find snakes in the wild, let alone catch them, and even if they did, banning domestic reptiles only increases the odds of this happening, as people who really want to keep them will have no other option but to catch wild snakes if they want to have a pet reptile. Given the option of an easily obtained, domesticated pet or the hassle and difficulties involved in finding, catching, and taming a wild snake, what do you think the majority of people are going to choose?
    Released herps: Again, not an issue unless you have a tropical climate. Snakes commonly kept in the hobby are tropical animals and cannot survive in colder climates like yours.
    Herps difficult to care for: This one made me legit laugh out loud. The majority of reptiles, especially snakes, are far EASIER to care for than pretty much any pet. They're crazy low maintenance. Seriously, my snake eats once a week, poops once a week. Feeding her and cleaning up after her takes max maybe 10 - 15 minutes a week?


    Like I said, I guarantee you it's political. Those "reasons" are nothing more than excuses, but I'm so glad you're finally able to keep some reptiles now. Any of the species you listed will make great pets, but I'd just mention that if you get a Beardie or a gecko, just remember that you'll have to keep live crickets in your home to feed them, and they never, ever, stop chirping, lol. You inevitably end up with one or two escaping and hiding out in your home as well. It doesn't bother some people, but it drives me crazy, lol.
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    Super Moderator Kuma'sMom's Avatar
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    Re: Norway's legalized owning reptiles!

    Quote Originally Posted by FatherOfFlo View Post
    One thing to consider if you get the cornsnake is a steady supply of frozen appropriately sized mice. Given that the reptile as a pet industry just came into existance in your country, a source may be difficult to find? I guess the same can be said for crickets or roaches.
    Far less of an issue with frozen mice than crickets or roaches. Even if it takes a while to develop a local supply, there's loads of suppliers that specialize in shipping out frozen mice, rats, birds, etc for very reasonable prices. Pretty much everyone I know with multiple snakes uses them.
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    Senior Member DaySleepers's Avatar
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    Re: Norway's legalized owning reptiles!

    Insects are available because tarantulas and the like are legal here and have been for a while, but the rodent/equipment supply issue is one reason why we're waiting a year+. Probably after the next time we move, actually, which will hopefully be into a house. I love this apartment, but we don't have a great place to set up a tank here, anyway. Still nice to be able to plan!

    And yeah, I was never especially convinced of the reasons. Especially given we share land borders with countries where herps are legal, which means there's been a thriving black market, law or no, for decades.
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    Member FatherOfFlo's Avatar
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    Re: Norway's legalized owning reptiles!

    Quote Originally Posted by Kuma'sMom View Post
    Yeah, those are all BS reasons, I guarantee it's political.
    Salmonella: Unless someone handles a snake and then immediately goes to handle chicken and eggs without washing their hands, there's zero risk there.
    People collecting snakes from the wild: Most people have no clue how to find snakes in the wild, let alone catch them, and even if they did, banning domestic reptiles only increases the odds of this happening, as people who really want to keep them will have no other option but to catch wild snakes if they want to have a pet reptile. Given the option of an easily obtained, domesticated pet or the hassle and difficulties involved in finding, catching, and taming a wild snake, what do you think the majority of people are going to choose?
    Released herps: Again, not an issue unless you have a tropical climate. Snakes commonly kept in the hobby are tropical animals and cannot survive in colder climates like yours.
    Herps difficult to care for: This one made me legit laugh out loud. The majority of reptiles, especially snakes, are far EASIER to care for than pretty much any pet. They're crazy low maintenance. Seriously, my snake eats once a week, poops once a week. Feeding her and cleaning up after her takes max maybe 10 - 15 minutes a week?


    Like I said, I guarantee you it's political. Those "reasons" are nothing more than excuses, but I'm so glad you're finally able to keep some reptiles now. Any of the species you listed will make great pets, but I'd just mention that if you get a Beardie or a gecko, just remember that you'll have to keep live crickets in your home to feed them, and they never, ever, stop chirping, lol. You inevitably end up with one or two escaping and hiding out in your home as well. It doesn't bother some people, but it drives me crazy, lol.
    Exactly. I've heard people try to claim that snakes are difficult to care for. I just laugh. Daily maintenance is providing fresh water. Done. Weekly maintenance is poop scoop and drop a mouse in the enclosure. Done. That's it. Heating/lighting can be on timers, humidity control can be computerized if needed. It's so care-free to keep snakes.
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    Senior Member DaySleepers's Avatar
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    Re: Norway's legalized owning reptiles!

    I suspect the talk about welfare issues regarding husbandry mostly refers to people who can't be bothered to research and/or do what's necessary to keep the temperature/humidity/lighting/diet appropriate to the species they're owning. I know exotic vets see a lot more major health issues due to basic husbandry being wrong than cat and dog vets, at least in the US. Of course once reptiles are set up in a tank with all the parameters at the right levels and thermometers/hydrometers to monitor things, their day to day care is much easier than mammals, for the most part! Until you get into the bigger or more delicate species, anyway.
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    Re: Norway's legalized owning reptiles!

    I have a beardie and he's a very good pet. They're comparatively gregarious (for reptiles) and sturdy as long as you get their lighting and heat right. And the adults eat mostly regular vegetables you get at the grocery store, so feeding them is less of a hassle than some other critters.
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    Re: Norway's legalized owning reptiles!

    I'll chime in with the recommendation of a beardie for a first reptile. They're very social. People around here take them out in public and let them safely interact with other earthlings. Laurel and I met a rescue beardie who was probably still somewhat traumatized but very sociable and tightly bonded with his new person. Both beings recognized each other as fellow earthlings and were curious and friendly. Laurel wagged her little tail and neither animal was afraid or perceived as a potential lunch.

    She doesn't respond that way to beardie babies in the pet store, but beardies seem to grow rather quickly. You will need a vet, and that might take some looking around and willingness to travel. I'm in the US and our holistic vet only sees dogs, cats, and rabbits.

    There are always downsides to pet ownership and many real ethical considerations but I am still happy for you.
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    Re: Norway's legalized owning reptiles!

    Quote Originally Posted by laurelsmom View Post
    I'll chime in with the recommendation of a beardie for a first reptile. They're very social. People around here take them out in public and let them safely interact with other earthlings. Laurel and I met a rescue beardie who was probably still somewhat traumatized but very sociable and tightly bonded with his new person. Both beings recognized each other as fellow earthlings and were curious and friendly. Laurel wagged her little tail and neither animal was afraid or perceived as a potential lunch.

    She doesn't respond that way to beardie babies in the pet store, but beardies seem to grow rather quickly. You will need a vet, and that might take some looking around and willingness to travel. I'm in the US and our holistic vet only sees dogs, cats, and rabbits.

    There are always downsides to pet ownership and many real ethical considerations but I am still happy for you.
    This thread is a year old, I'm sure the OP has already purchased a reptile if they were going to.
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