Should we get him fixed?
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    Senior Member apoirier594's Avatar
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    Question Should we get him fixed?

    Ok so I have a Golden Retriever puppy, eight weeks old. We took him to the vet yesterday to do-worm him, and get him this shot. They talked about fixing him. Should I do it? What are the downsides? What are the good things? Is he healthy if he doesn't get fixed or if he does?
    She said she thinks that most people should. She said if you are a responsible owner there is no need. I don't plan on breeding and he is going to be a indoor dog, but I also have a 1/2 acer back yard fenced off. I don't think I want to fix him, just wondering the pros and cons. I also don't want him becoming a fatty.

    What should i do? I also have 2 other males one is fixed and the other isn't.
    They are my dads dogs, this is mine(golden pup) so what do yall think?

    Edit Also do males usually mark if not fixed?
    Last edited by apoirier594; 09-01-2009 at 06:17 PM.
    Hope I helped.
    You should always at least call your vet for advice, only takes a minute.

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    Re: Should we get him fixed?

    The main reason for neutering is birth control. You don't want to be responsible for him fathering unwanted puppies that end up being killed for lack of homes.

    Marking is a training issue in most cases. In the rare cases where a dog is a crazy obsessive marker (my grandpa's dog was like that), neutering does help most of the time. But mostly it's about what you allow him to do.

    Neutering doesn't cause a dog to be overweight---overfeeding and underexercising does that. A neutered dog does have lower caloric needs, but you just feed him less and it's fine.

    If you're 100% confident that you can keep him 100% contained, neutering isn't strictly necessary. But most people can't keep their pets 100% contained. Keep in mind that dogs can breed through wire/chain-link fencing, so if he's ever left in the yard unsupervised, I wouldn't consider that to be "100% contained".

    If you do decide to have him neutered, timing is also in question. Many large-breed-knowlegable people would recommend waiting until he's 12-18 months old before having it done, to allow him time to grow and develop properly.
    Last edited by Willowy; 09-01-2009 at 07:46 PM.
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    Senior Member pittsabowawa's Avatar
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    Re: Should we get him fixed?

    I would 100% advise on getting him neutered. If your not planning on breeding than there is no reason to have an intact dog. Neutering is a way of not having to be 100% vigilant when your dog is around other animals that are also not fixed. I also agree however that for large breed dogs you should wait 1-2 years

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    Re: Should we get him fixed?

    Personally I would get him fixed because unfixed dogs like to mark the house, mark territory and are more aggressive towards other dogs than fixed dogs. He will not get fat if you exercise and feed him the right amount. Lots of unfixed dogs are fat too, so that is not a big factor.

    Also, if there are female dogs in heat near your area that he can smell, sometimes they stop eating for quite a while and become much thinner because all they can think about is the female. He will most likely try to find a way to get out of your house and mate with the female too. Sometimes through destructive means like chewing the door, digging the fence, etc.

    The downside is that there is a little higher chance of him getting fat but that's because you have to decrease food by 10-15% after neutering which seems like a good thing for me. Cheaper if my dog's eating less to maintain the same weight.

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    Re: Should we get him fixed?

    A neutered male dog can not get testicular cancer, and in many cases it makes the dog more submissive.

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    Senior Member Tankstar's Avatar
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    Re: Should we get him fixed?

    Majority of things you hear such as
    will mark.
    will be agressive.
    will run away.
    will only thing about mating.

    is well all BS. Its training. If you know for a solid fac your dog will have no chance of getting out and mating will nilly. And you can control a intact male. read all the health benifits OF neutering and health benifits of jeeping him intact.

    My 6 year old male doesnt mark inside any way (outside yes. but I allow it) is submissive enough he can hand out with manyd ogs, go to classes, go to dog parks, pet stores ect and wont pick a fight. he will stick up for himself if he is being over pushed by another dog, which again I dont mind. He should be allowed IMO to tell another dog to back off if they are bothering him. dogs speak better language then we do.

    there are plenty of health reasons to neuter and plenty not to. he is 8 weeks you got a while to go to figure it out

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    Senior Member DogsforMe's Avatar
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    Re: Should we get him fixed?

    I read this article b4 getting Tilba & waited until she had one season & she was 14 m/o when she was spayed. I believe it's best to wait until a male is 18 m/o b4 neutering especially with the large breeds.

    http://www.caninesports.com/SpayNeuter.html
    [

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    Senior Member Ayanla's Avatar
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    Re: Should we get him fixed?

    My dad, who I visited on weekends occasionally as a kid, had a Doberman Pinscher named Caesar that he kept intact. Caesar was kept on a chain in the fenced yard sometimes. Thick, heavy, chain bolted to a cinderblock in the porch wall. Wooden privacy fence so he couldn't even see the females. My dad adored this dog. I know the chain sounds bad, but my dad thought he was doing away with any chance for him to get loose while still letting him outside to play. One day we came outside and Caesar wasn't in the yard. We rushed to the front of the house to see him running far down the hill, chain and cinder block in tow. He had pulled the cinder block out of the wall and gotten through the gate that one of us kids had left open (4 kids in the house at the time, ranging from 4-9). He was gone for more than 14 hours and fathered two litters of puppies that we found out about, and who knows how many he fathered with stray dogs or dogs who's owners didn't know who to blame for their half doberman pups. That dog dragged a cement cinder block all over town in his quest to find the ladies. That's how motivated he was.

    Obviously it was an unfortunate quirk of circumstance that let him get loose. The cinder block must have been loose in the wall and we just happened to have left the gate ajar that day, but my point is that even the most responsible owner can never guarantee 100% that their dog will not ever get loose, especially if it's a dog that has occasional unsupervised use of outdoor space (ie going out in the yard unleashed/unsupervised), I know there are some strong advocates of leaving an animal intact on this board and I'm sure they'll chime in soon, but my personal opinion is that there is no reason to leave a dog intact unless you are showing or breeding them.

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    Senior Member hulkamaniac's Avatar
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    Re: Should we get him fixed?

    Quote Originally Posted by Ayanla View Post
    My dad, who I visited on weekends occasionally as a kid, had a Doberman Pinscher named Caesar that he kept intact. Caesar was kept on a chain in the fenced yard sometimes. Thick, heavy, chain bolted to a cinderblock in the porch wall. Wooden privacy fence so he couldn't even see the females. My dad adored this dog. I know the chain sounds bad, but my dad thought he was doing away with any chance for him to get loose while still letting him outside to play. One day we came outside and Caesar wasn't in the yard. We rushed to the front of the house to see him running far down the hill, chain and cinder block in tow. He had pulled the cinder block out of the wall and gotten through the gate that one of us kids had left open (4 kids in the house at the time, ranging from 4-9). He was gone for more than 14 hours and fathered two litters of puppies that we found out about, and who knows how many he fathered with stray dogs or dogs who's owners didn't know who to blame for their half doberman pups. That dog dragged a cement cinder block all over town in his quest to find the ladies. That's how motivated he was.

    Obviously it was an unfortunate quirk of circumstance that let him get loose. The cinder block must have been loose in the wall and we just happened to have left the gate ajar that day, but my point is that even the most responsible owner can never guarantee 100% that their dog will not ever get loose, especially if it's a dog that has occasional unsupervised use of outdoor space (ie going out in the yard unleashed/unsupervised), I know there are some strong advocates of leaving an animal intact on this board and I'm sure they'll chime in soon, but my personal opinion is that there is no reason to leave a dog intact unless you are showing or breeding them.
    It's stories like this that make me tell people to speuter their dogs unless there is a very strong prevailing reason not to. Someone posted a story on here once about a dog they owned who was very old. If I remember right he was a lab who was 12 yrs old, walked on three legs and was half blind and half deaf. They let him out to do his business figuring the guy couldn't get far in his state and couldn't find him. They got a call from the neighbors a mile or so away saying the dog was there and wouldn't leave them or their bitch in heat alone.

    I don't think expecting someone to control their dog 100% of the time 24/7/365 is a reasonable expectation. To me it's like telling teenagers to practice abstinence as a means to prevent STDs and teen pregnancy. Does it work? Yes, it does when it's practiced. Is it practiced 100% of the time? No, it's not. Is it reasonable to expect every single teenager to practice abstinence? I don't think it is. Nor do I think it reasonable to expect the vast majority of dog owners to control their dogs at all times.

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    Senior Member CoverTune's Avatar
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    Re: Should we get him fixed?

    Quote Originally Posted by hulkamaniac View Post
    It's stories like this that make me tell people to speuter their dogs unless there is a very strong prevailing reason not to. Someone posted a story on here once about a dog they owned who was very old. If I remember right he was a lab who was 12 yrs old, walked on three legs and was half blind and half deaf. They let him out to do his business figuring the guy couldn't get far in his state and couldn't find him. They got a call from the neighbors a mile or so away saying the dog was there and wouldn't leave them or their bitch in heat alone.

    I don't think expecting someone to control their dog 100% of the time 24/7/365 is a reasonable expectation. To me it's like telling teenagers to practice abstinence as a means to prevent STDs and teen pregnancy. Does it work? Yes, it does when it's practiced. Is it practiced 100% of the time? No, it's not. Is it reasonable to expect every single teenager to practice abstinence? I don't think it is. Nor do I think it reasonable to expect the vast majority of dog owners to control their dogs at all times.
    Agreed. It just seems like so much additional stress to put on ones self that is not necessary.


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    Re: Should we get him fixed?

    I'm conflicted on what to do myself with our pup.

    We have Gavin who we got at 18 months (2 months ago). He had to be neutered because the pound won't give you a dog unless they are. I never knew they eat less when neutered. I wonder if this is why Gavin hasn't gained weight, he's lost a little.? I remember the pound saying "He's 75 pounds, but I bet he gains more after being with you a month or two" and instead he's at 73.5. I struggle to get that dog to eat. He seems happy, though. So with him I didn't get to make the choice. Even though he's neutered, he still marks inside on occasion (especially since the pup has come home). He constantly marks outside though, especially if he sees another dog. So I don't think the question of neutering has anything to do with that.

    Our cocker spaniel pup is only 3.5 months old. I asked our breeder (who happens to be our daycare provider for the girls, as well) said she neuters her dogs only because the ones she's had have had major marking wars in the house and they stopped doing that when they got neutered. So she recommended I have Buster done, even though we are in a situation where we shouldn't have to worry about it where we live.

    The only thing I can think of, that we just ran across, is taking the dogs to the dog park. I was watching Buster like a hawk, but I turned for a quick second to pick his ball up and he was starting to hump another dog. Luckily the owner of the other dog stopped it from happening, but it's instances like this even I saying I can watch my dog 24/7 and can guaranty it won't happen....well I was just picking up the ball and he went for it so.......it can happen, IMO.

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    Senior Member hulkamaniac's Avatar
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    Re: Should we get him fixed?

    Quote Originally Posted by rdnkln View Post
    I'm conflicted on what to do myself with our pup.

    We have Gavin who we got at 18 months (2 months ago). He had to be neutered because the pound won't give you a dog unless they are. I never knew they eat less when neutered. I wonder if this is why Gavin hasn't gained weight, he's lost a little.? I remember the pound saying "He's 75 pounds, but I bet he gains more after being with you a month or two" and instead he's at 73.5. I struggle to get that dog to eat. He seems happy, though. So with him I didn't get to make the choice. Even though he's neutered, he still marks inside on occasion (especially since the pup has come home). He constantly marks outside though, especially if he sees another dog. So I don't think the question of neutering has anything to do with that.
    I can tell you that neutering doesn't affect appetite. Brutus is neutered and has been for years. He was very fat when I got him and he is constantly begging for food. There may be more involved with your dog not eating. Most healthy dogs don't turn down food.

    Our cocker spaniel pup is only 3.5 months old. I asked our breeder (who happens to be our daycare provider for the girls, as well) said she neuters her dogs only because the ones she's had have had major marking wars in the house and they stopped doing that when they got neutered. So she recommended I have Buster done, even though we are in a situation where we shouldn't have to worry about it where we live.

    The only thing I can think of, that we just ran across, is taking the dogs to the dog park. I was watching Buster like a hawk, but I turned for a quick second to pick his ball up and he was starting to hump another dog. Luckily the owner of the other dog stopped it from happening, but it's instances like this even I saying I can watch my dog 24/7 and can guaranty it won't happen....well I was just picking up the ball and he went for it so.......it can happen, IMO.
    Zero was neutered at 1.5 yrs and he marks all over outside. Never inside. I've never seen Brutus mark anywhere, but I have no clue when he was neutered. Marking is a behavioral thing though that can be trained. I could train Zero to not mark, but there just doesn't seem to be a point to it to me. I don't see the harm.

    As I said, I don't think it's reasonable to expect owners to watch their dogs 24/7/365 for the 10-15 years their dog will be with them. I don't think that's a reasonable expectation and honestly, why would you want to put the stress on yourself unless you had intentions of breeding the dog down the road or showing the dog or there was some strong prevailing reason to not speuter.

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    Re: Should we get him fixed?

    Quote Originally Posted by rdnkln View Post
    We have Gavin who we got at 18 months (2 months ago). He had to be neutered because the pound won't give you a dog unless they are. I never knew they eat less when neutered. I wonder if this is why Gavin hasn't gained weight, he's lost a little.? I remember the pound saying "He's 75 pounds, but I bet he gains more after being with you a month or two" and instead he's at 73.5. I struggle to get that dog to eat. He seems happy, though. So with him I didn't get to make the choice. Even though he's neutered, he still marks inside on occasion (especially since the pup has come home). He constantly marks outside though, especially if he sees another dog. So I don't think the question of neutering has anything to do with that.
    Actually it does. Dogs that are neutered young (between 3-8/9 months old) generally mark a lot less and doesn't mark too much outside or is interested in females. Dogs that are neutered after sexual maturity tend to still be interested in females if she's not spayed and is in heat and will often mount. Also they mark a lot more.

    Usually you can fix marking in the house with umbilical training. A few weeks and they won't mark anymore if they're neutered. It's almost impossible to stop a dog from marking if he's unneutered.

    And it shouldn't have anything to do with appetite because most dogs will eat the same amount they ate before and that's why people limit their dogs to less food after neutering.

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    Re: Should we get him fixed?

    I would get him castrated but at about 9 months so he can mature nicely.

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    Senior Member Xeph's Avatar
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    Re: Should we get him fixed?

    Personally I would get him fixed because unfixed dogs like to mark the house, mark territory and are more aggressive towards other dogs than fixed dogs.
    My males don't mark in the house.

    Buddy did, but it was a rare medical issue (rare as in more often than not such an issue is behavioral). Buddy was neutered and his "marking" stopped. What really caused the problem was an enlarged prostate, and he was having a hard time urinating, so it just happened that he ended up urinating in the house as well as outside.

    Strauss does not mark in the house. He's 5 years old and still intact.

    If your puppy is male, I'd personally weight until 18-24 months to alter.

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    Senior Member cshellenberger's Avatar
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    Re: Should we get him fixed?

    Quote Originally Posted by Michiyo-Fir View Post
    Actually it does. Dogs that are neutered young (between 3-8/9 months old) generally mark a lot less and doesn't mark too much outside or is interested in females. Dogs that are neutered after sexual maturity tend to still be interested in females if she's not spayed and is in heat and will often mount. Also they mark a lot more.

    Usually you can fix marking in the house with umbilical training. A few weeks and they won't mark anymore if they're neutered. It's almost impossible to stop a dog from marking if he's unneutered.

    And it shouldn't have anything to do with appetite because most dogs will eat the same amount they ate before and that's why people limit their dogs to less food after neutering.

    Really? I'd like you to tell my Frank that, he was nuetered at 6 months and still marks, My Mastiff who was never nuetered did not mark at all.

    Nuetering doesn't effect appetite, however nuetering (or spaying) too young can have some health repercussions especially in large dn giant breed dogs because it causes the growth plates to close later, causing the dog to be leggier and possibly (according to some recent veterinary studies) increaseing the chances of bone cancer by 80x.

    I agree with nuetering, however I think it should be done at an appropriate age, no younger than six months in small breeds and 18 months to two years in large/giant breeds.



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    Senior Member animalcraker's Avatar
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    Re: Should we get him fixed?

    Quote Originally Posted by Michiyo-Fir View Post
    It's almost impossible to stop a dog from marking if he's unneutered.
    Gee it's a good thing my boy doesn't believe everything he reads. I've never had a problem with my boy marking in the house. I've never had to do anything different or special for my intact dog that I wouldn't have done with my sputered dog. I don't find it stressful at all to be a responsible dog owner.

    There's lots of conflicting information on the pro's and con's of sputering your pets. Some of it is really good and some of it's bad. Whichever decision an owner makes it should be there own; based on the information available and not what someone said they should or shouldn't do for one reason or another.

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    Re: Should we get him fixed?

    never had a neutered dog and probably won't ever. My dogs don't mark all over the place, aren't agressive (my old man did therapy work AND was used at stud), they are perfectly healthy and don't run all over the place making puppies...
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    Re: Should we get him fixed?

    Quote Originally Posted by animalcraker View Post
    Gee it's a good thing my boy doesn't believe everything he reads. I've never had a problem with my boy marking in the house. I've never had to do anything different or special for my intact dog that I wouldn't have done with my sputered dog. I don't find it stressful at all to be a responsible dog owner.
    I got this information from 2 breeders that intact males will mark. Especially if there are females in season around the house or outside. She said her male dogs ALWAYS mark when females are in season so much so that it's hard to even reliably potty train them. Usually if there isn't any females or any unspayed females, it's not as bad.

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    Senior Member hulkamaniac's Avatar
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    Re: Should we get him fixed?

    I've never had an intact dog of either gender and likely never will. I have heard from several people who have intact dogs though and have no issues with them marking.

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