containing the excitment
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Thread: containing the excitment

  1. #1
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    containing the excitment

    We have a three year old 70lb boxer mix who gets way to geeked up when he sees people, or dogs. if he can't go over there right now and play with them he'll start throwing a fit, jumping and barking pulling on his leash and then he'll try nipping at your hands to try and pull you. He doesn't have a mean bone in his body, and would never intentionally hurt anyone, but his excited nipping has got him in trouble a couple of times. There doesn't seem to be to much that gets him to really snap out of it unless i get in front of him and back him into sitting. We don't want to have his excitement become an issue

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  3. #2
    Senior Member Jen2010's Avatar
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    Re: containing the excitment

    My Boxer mix used to be the same, and still gets that way with certain people who like to get her riled up.

    I assume your dog is food motivated? What worked for us was teaching her that the reward is on the floor. When she would get excited we would toss treats onto the floor so she would frantically go after them instead of the person. The idea is to teach him that if all 4 feet are on the floor he will get rewarded. You could also get him to sit and get rewarded for that, if he'll sit for you. It takes a lot of treats, patience, and time for this to become a habit. You could also try using a toy if he likes to play. Keep a favourite toy within reach and before he starts freaking out, give him the toy and encourage him to play with it.

    You will have to practice this at a distance until he's behaving how you want, then slowly make your way closer and closer. If he's still freaking out, you're too close; go back a step.
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  4. #3
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    Re: containing the excitment

    Quote Originally Posted by Jen2010 View Post
    My Boxer mix used to be the same, and still gets that way with certain people who like to get her riled up.

    I assume your dog is food motivated? What worked for us was teaching her that the reward is on the floor. When she would get excited we would toss treats onto the floor so she would frantically go after them instead of the person. The idea is to teach him that if all 4 feet are on the floor he will get rewarded. You could also get him to sit and get rewarded for that, if he'll sit for you. It takes a lot of treats, patience, and time for this to become a habit. You could also try using a toy if he likes to play. Keep a favourite toy within reach and before he starts freaking out, give him the toy and encourage him to play with it.

    You will have to practice this at a distance until he's behaving how you want, then slowly make your way closer and closer. If he's still freaking out, you're too close; go back a step.

    He is defiantly food motivated, and we've been doing that in more controlled environments, getting in and out of the car, following us on the stairs, and through the door etc....I'll have to try that when walking

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  6. #4
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    Re: containing the excitment

    The thing you need to do (and it starts at home) is consistent impulse control. Boxers are a Bully Breed and they can have a lot of "exuberance.."

    Impulse control is sitting at the door until you mark the behavior and release them from the sit (the marker "Yes" ends the behavior and the reward is being able to go out the door). It is also lying down without wiggling until marked and released to do something else (such as get a ball or got to the food dish and eat). Impulse control is learning to sit or lie down while you throw a ball around and until you mark it and release them to the ball.

    You must start in increments and not expect too much at first and you need to be consistent.

    When you get this going well at home, move it to outside and then to areas where the stimulus is greater. You must be 100% consistent.

    You also need to build drive for other things like a tug toy so that when you are out and about you need to "change the conversation" and use the toy as a reward instead of going up to the dog or person the dog wants to see as the reward. I like a tug toy because it REALLY can engage a dog with YOU.

  7. #5
    Senior Member PatriciafromCO's Avatar
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    Re: containing the excitment

    leave......... act like a fool ,,,,,, leave it goes away........ the one thing you will learn is how far away your dog is able to handle it so you can work on training skills and reward so you in time can be closer. why you would want to keep going into a situation that you know they unable to handle, and allow your dog to practice the behavior ? Find something else or some place else for them to enjoy spending time with yall and being out on an adventure.

  8. #6
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    Re: containing the excitment

    The thing that worries me the most is when someone, or he thinks someone is at the door, he'll run to the window and start barking, and sometimes he'll grab at your hand and to try to bring you to the window.

  9. #7
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    Re: containing the excitment

    Give him a toy to carry and unload on in the house. I use a Gappay ball on a rope that he only gets at certain times (not a toy he has all the time as it is his reward for working). You can use an available toy he likes but does not chew. Tell him to "get his toy" and instead of unloading on your hands he can squeeze his toy (one with a sound may be more desirable). Soft toys work well for this. If he chews, just have one in a drawer near the door and when he starts all this get the toy out and engage him or let him carry that. When he is done being excited, put the toy up.

    Better than unloading on your hands.

  10. #8
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    Re: containing the excitment

    Interesting...We'll have to give that a try thanks

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