Need Help! Anytime someone's in the backyard -___-
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Thread: Need Help! Anytime someone's in the backyard -___-

  1. #1
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    Need Help! Anytime someone's in the backyard -___-

    Anytime someone's in the backyard -___-, Butters barks like CRAAZZYYY!!! WE have double glass sliding doors so she can see when someone's outside, and we could block her access to the kitchen, which means no more barking, but to do this all the time, is very annoying

    Any ideas on how to get her to stop barking anytime someone is outside? I've tried correcting her and rewarding when she does stop barking, but this doesn't seem to be working

    Thanks for your help!

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    Senior Member elrohwen's Avatar
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    Re: Need Help! Anytime someone's in the backyard -___-

    If removing her from the kitchen stops the barking, then I would absolutely do it every single time. Once she is quiet, let her back in, but if she barks, right back out again. She will learn that she only gets to stay and watch people outside if she is quiet about it. If she looks outside at someone and is quiet for even a second, reward that.

    If people are going by a lot, I would block her from the kitchen any time you don't have the time or energy to train her. If you let her bark one day because you're busy doing something else, but then try to train the next day, she's not going to get the idea.
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    Re: Need Help! Anytime someone's in the backyard -___-

    Hmmm interesting...I wonder how many times until she learns! I"ll give it a go. Thank you!

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    Senior Member Greater Swiss's Avatar
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    Re: Need Help! Anytime someone's in the backyard -___-

    Does Butters stop....ever? Another option is if someone is out there and Butters is barking go stand next to him....wait....wait....wait. When he stops barking give a treat, there's a good chance that the possibility of a treat might keep him quiet for a second or two....if it does, give another treat.
    You could also stand away from the door/window with him on a leash, wait until he sees the person, and wait for calm (I'm basically suggesting the same as before....but start a distance from the window).
    If Butters doesn't stop barking, I'm not sure what to do other than keep him away from the door....an option that I personally don't like simply because it doesn't really solve the problem....it just avoids it, but if that's what needs to happen, I guess you'd be stuck with that.
    Good luck

    Some people say that doing the same thing again and again and expecting a different result is the definition of insanity, I call it training my dog

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    Re: Need Help! Anytime someone's in the backyard -___-

    That seems to be the best training advice, I'll give it a go again. I've tried the same technique for teaching her how to 'be quiet' but she only barks when someone pulls up in the drive way with the car, and that's kind of hard to 'renact' over and over again to get that pattern goin'.

    Now that it's cold, there won't be anyone in the backyard, so I'll have to ask a helper! Thank you ~

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    Re: Need Help! Anytime someone's in the backyard -___-

    Ho'boy, people get tired of me describing training for situations like this. The problem is your dog doesn't think like you. On most every level your dog (any dog) is "resource guarding." This means it's all about her domain, her people, her food source, security and any other wonderful pleasure she can imagine. She doesn't care what it takes to defend her territory. She has no way of knowing if those outside threats/noises might somehow get inside. That's why she's barking. Every dog in a group (pack) has a job (purpose) for the means of group survival. That's why they work in a "pack" and not solo. Her "job" is to alert! It's instinctual. And (sad but true) your "corrections" (commotion) are only adding to the general "kerfuffle" of the moment. Meaning, it's just more the noise, attention ... which adds to her sense of "power." That's why your corrections like ("no!") are just incidental and temporarily inconvenient interference in her mind. Because all she cares about, is that she's got your attention. And you are interacting with her, which is her biggest payoff!

    Now you've got to figure out a better payoff! And here's how:

    Of course she stops when she can't see what's going on. So you can approach the remedy in 2 ways, but it's going to take absolute consistency. Dogs learn from repetition, meaning that variations in your direction (expectation) or especially in your reaction, only confuses them. Intelligent dogs, learn a behavior (barking to deter a threat) from permission (no obstacle) test it (impermanent obstacle overcome) and repeat, until road-blocked. People assume this means a correction. But infact - it can be a more effective distraction (because it's a better payoff).

    (One) Teaching the use of distraction means you always have to be there with her, otherwise keep her from seeing the threat. Because you really don't want her to get "amped" up by that threat outside anyway. So keep her in the kitchen, or behind the drapes, or in a crate (and NO they are not "prisons" just safe havens, until people use them as punishment!).

    So .... when you are with her, do marker training (which does NOT involve a clicker!). It is simply a way to condition the dog positively. And to your specific cue! Hopefully food will be a high enough value to her. Pick something yummy, and it can be a portion of her meal. So that you're training with half (or more of) her food intake (meat/chicken, not kibble). Pick a cue word. Clear, crisp, and normally unused in conversation. Like "Silence!" (Of course she's got to be in your presence/ideally sitting in front of you). Then use the word with a happy voice! And instantaneously treat! And I mean instantaneously! (That's charging the mark). Repeat 20 times. Do it 5 five days in a row (or AM & PM). So that she has locked into her brain, that the cue word means instant yummy reward!! PLUS your positive happy attention! You've just now found a way to reassure her in a very meaningful way!

    Just know, that in the meantime (when not in training) she's still going to go crazy at noises. And she may have to get a little hungry, before she figures out that you hold the secret to her REAL pleasure! That mentality begins to shift her attention from "things outside" (potentially threats) to YOU inside (absolute reward!!). Which is going to make her feel confident and safer. (Ask yourself, now which direction would you choose??)

    What you are really doing however, is building in a very specific relationship with her. Meaning, that YOU are making yourself more important than anything else. YOU and she together, ... are now twice the value of other concerns in her world, in her mind's eye. because you can make her feel great (by reducing anxiety or fear). Now, while you're not directly correcting her for the barking YET, you are giving her the confidence to TRUST in your direction (going forward). That's the key, gaining her attention, and requiring her to focus on you. For good things!

    This is called building in engagement. And the training is ongoing, throughout the day, randomly. She'll probably follow you around like clockwork. If playing (tug, chase, fetch, walking outside) is also her "thing" .... then engage with that activity too! And you've just built two things in her life (food-pleasure PLUS fun)!!

    (Two) build in your next "cue" word ... "Come." Go through the same routine as above. Call it a drill. So she is learning to come very, very reliably. Never "correct" an absent behavior (as in not coming) only positive behavior. Try to build in success as well. In a quiet place, so she can really learn the cue.

    Next you can link the multiple cue's (when you're in another room, and she's barking), say "silence" and "come" for her reward! And as she becomes really good at this ... JACKPOT the reward! Meaning double-treat, extra happy voice, positive petting. Whatever sends her into ecstasy!

    I remind people, when you're doing marker training, don't forget to build in a "release" word like "done." So a dog can go back to their routine. They need to discern when to have their focus on you (expectation) from when it's not required. Always keep training fun, motivating, and successful! If it's an off day and your not getting any positive behaviors, then do some timeout (quiet place, other room, crate). Just a little "social separation" will help incentivize them into resuming interaction.

    But whatever routines you build, make sure it's a pattern the dog can learn. "If I do this, this happens!" If I don't do this, nothing happens."

    The second remedy, though in the long run will be much more of a nuisance to you, is only a temporary fix for the moment, which is to make a "noise" can. Use an empty, washed out, small pineapple juice can, or a soda can .... fill with only a couple of tablespoons of broken glass (can get at a hobby store), and seal the can tightly with packing tape. A "noise can" will definitely distract, and deter, but it will NEVER be a lasting remedy. Also it may intimidate a "soft" (meaning insecure) dog in non-productive ways. Remember, you never want to build fear into your dog. Only a trusting relationship with you!
    Last edited by Pacificsun; 04-22-2019 at 07:05 PM.

  9. #7
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    Re: Need Help! Anytime someone's in the backyard -___-

    Quote Originally Posted by Pacificsun View Post
    Ho'boy, people get tired of me describing training for situations like this. The problem is your dog doesn't think like you. On most every level your dog (any dog) is "resource guarding." This means it's all about her domain, her people, her food source, security and any other wonderful pleasure she can imagine. She doesn't care what it takes to defend her territory. She has no way of knowing if those outside threats/noises might somehow get inside. That's why she's barking. Every dog in a group (pack) has a job (purpose) for the means of group survival. That's why they work in a "pack" and not solo. Her "job" is to alert! It's instinctual. And (sad but true) your "corrections" (commotion) are only adding to the general "kerfuffle" of the moment. Meaning, it's just more the noise, attention ... which adds to her sense of "power." That's why your corrections like ("no!") are just incidental and temporarily inconvenient interference in her mind. Because all she cares about, is that she's got your attention. And you are interacting with her, which is her biggest payoff!

    Now you've got to figure out a better payoff! And here's how:

    Of course she stops when she can't see what's going on. So you can approach the remedy in 2 ways, but it's going to take absolute consistency. Dogs learn from repetition, meaning that variations in your direction (expectation) or especially in your reaction, only confuses them. Intelligent dogs, learn a behavior (barking to deter a threat) from permission (no obstacle) test it (impermanent obstacle overcome) and repeat, until road-blocked. People assume this means a correction. But infact - it can be a more effective distraction (because it's a better payoff).

    (One) Teaching the use of distraction means you always have to be there with her, otherwise keep her from seeing the threat. Because you really don't want her to get "amped" up by that threat outside anyway. So keep her in the kitchen, or behind the drapes, or in a crate (and NO they are not "prisons" just safe havens, until people use them as punishment!).

    So .... when you are with her, do marker training (which does NOT involve a clicker!). It is simply a way to condition the dog positively. And to your specific cue! Hopefully food will be a high enough value to her. Pick something yummy, and it can be a portion of her meal. So that you're training with half (or more of) her food intake (meat/chicken, not kibble). Pick a cue word. Clear, crisp, and normally unused in conversation. Like "Silence!" (Of course she's got to be in your presence/ideally sitting in front of you). Then use the word with a happy voice! And instantaneously treat! And I mean instantaneously! (That's charging the mark). Repeat 20 times. Do it 5 five days in a row (or AM & PM). So that she has locked into her brain, that the cue word means instant yummy reward!! PLUS your positive happy attention! You've just now found a way to reassure her in a very meaningful way!

    Just know, that in the meantime (when not in training) she's still going to go crazy at noises. And she may have to get a little hungry, before she figures out that you hold the secret to her REAL pleasure! That mentality begins to shift her attention from "things outside" (potentially threats) to YOU inside (absolute reward!!). Which is going to make her feel confident and safer. (Ask yourself, now which direction would you choose??)

    What you are really doing however, is building in a very specific relationship with her. Meaning, that YOU are making yourself more important than anything else. YOU and she together, ... are now twice the value of other concerns in her world, in her mind's eye. because you can make her feel great (by reducing anxiety or fear). Now, while you're not directly correcting her for the barking YET, you are giving her the confidence to TRUST in your direction (going forward). That's the key, gaining her attention, and requiring her to focus on you. For good things!

    This is called building in engagement. And the training is ongoing, throughout the day, randomly. She'll probably follow you around like clockwork. If playing (tug, chase, fetch, walking outside) is also her "thing" .... then engage with that activity too! And you've just built two things in her life (food-pleasure PLUS fun)!!

    (Two) build in your next "cue" word ... "Come." Go through the same routine as above. Call it a drill. So she is learning to come very, very reliably. Never "correct" an absent behavior (as in not coming) only positive behavior. Try to build in success as well. In a quiet place, so she can really learn the cue.

    Next you can link the multiple cue's (when you're in another room, and she's barking), say "silence" and "come" for her reward! And as she becomes really good at this ... JACKPOT the reward! Meaning double-treat, extra happy voice, positive petting. Whatever sends her into ecstasy!

    I remind people, when you're doing marker training, don't forget to build in a "release" word like "done." So a dog can go back to their routine. They need to discern when to have their focus on you (expectation) from when it's not required. Always keep training fun, motivating, and successful! If it's an off day and your not getting any positive behaviors, then do some timeout (quiet place, other room, crate). Just a little "social separation" will help incentivize them into resuming interaction.

    But whatever routines you build, make sure it's a pattern the dog can learn. "If I do this, this happens!" If I don't do this, nothing happens."

    The second remedy, though in the long run will be much more of a nuisance to you, is only a temporary fix for the moment, which is to make a "noise" can. Use an empty, washed out, small pineapple juice can, or a soda can .... fill with only a couple of tablespoons of broken glass (can get at a hobby store), and seal the can tightly with packing tape. A "noise can" will definitely distract, and deter, but it will NEVER be a lasting remedy. Also it may intimidate a "soft" (meaning insecure) dog in non-productive ways. Remember, you never want to build fear into your dog. Only a trusting relationship with you!
    This advice for this issue is.. not the best... IMO
    We don't know why the dog is barking. Is it because he knows the people out back and wants out with them or is he barking at people he does not know? The best advice is rewarding for silence and teaching him that he gets what he wants (being let out in the back yard???) only when you get what you want (silence).

    My dog will carry on when I am in the back yard and he is inside or out in a kennel NOT because he is "resource guarding" but because he wants to be out there with me! If he is in the basement dog kennel and he hears me outside (with or without the other dog) he has words.. he uses both big words and little words! LOL

    NOTHING to do with resource guarding. He wants out to do "stuff" with me (like training or playing which is the same to him).

    What is unclear is if the back yard is shared and these are random people out there or if the back yard is for the people in the house and he knows the people outside.

    I would NOT use the can or noise maker to stop the barking. FAR better to just use a crate and crate the dog away from the window.

  10. #8
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    Re: Need Help! Anytime someone's in the backyard -___-

    Thread is old.. 2013!!!! Wish I had not bothered to respond.

  11. #9
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    Re: Need Help! Anytime someone's in the backyard -___-

    Well I had misread this to assume she was barking while looking out the window at strange people in general outside. "Any ideas on how to get her to stop barking anytime someone is outside? I've tried correcting her and rewarding when she does stop barking, but this doesn't seem to be working." Upon re-reading, in this case, I think she just wants to be with her people (for fun) in her own backyard. And do admit over kill in terms of my recommendation. Thank you for pointing this out.

    One problem with barking is that it starts with one thing, for one reason ... and then the dog continues to do so for more attention. (And as you also realize) in the comment above they were confusing the dog by using both correction and rewarding. That's why I tried to straighten out the system of rewarding (marker training, relationship building). The goal is to lower the anxiety threshold. Anxiety is just over excitement, and some dogs (like mine) need a better sense of self-control, so he's always a "work in progress." And he can be easily distracted with a game of fetch or high value treats!

    Also I realize the people asking only want an easy quick fix for a specific thing. That's why they're running up a question here. But hopefully, the principle of training might be useful for the right person who accidentally comes across this thread!

    I'm glad you're a proponent of using a crate for useful, positive purposes! People are really touchy on this forum! (I try my best ��).

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