Leash training is house training is leash training...
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Thread: Leash training is house training is leash training...

  1. #1
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    Leash training is house training is leash training...

    Hey all, I知 a new member with a new Weimaraner/Vizsla mix who will be joining our family once he reaches 8 weeks. My wife and I are both experienced dog owners, but since we both grew up on farms with lots of land, this will be the first time either of us has needed to teach a dog how to behave on-leash. I have a few questions that I haven稚 been able to find answers to, mainly about the relationship between house breaking and leash training, which, as the title suggests, I view as being highly related.

    When the dog is taken out of the crate, out of the house, and allowed to do his business, what should I be expecting of him as far as leash manners? I certainly want to start leash training immediately, and I understand that every bad action when the dog is on-leash puts me behind, but is a 5 AM potty break really the time for training?

    While I値l initially settle for just not eliminating in the house, I値l eventually want my dog to make it to the empty lot two doors down. When and how do I need to start working on this?

    As I see it, there are three phases of walking: tight heel, relaxed but controlled (silky leash), and just being a dog (using a retractable leash and allowing the dog to sniff, etc). Do I need to teach these in a specific order?
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  3. #2
    Senior Member elrohwen's Avatar
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    Re: Leash training is house training is leash training...

    With a young puppy on leash, you really just need to focus on not being a spazz. In other words, not attacking the leash, walking in a relatively straight line, going in generally the same direction as you, etc. Every walk is a training session, yes, but you're starting with a puppy who has no idea what a leash is, so keep your expectations reasonable. If he pulls off in another direction, be a tree and praise/reward when he redirects back to you. Lure the pup to walk with you on your left side and click/treat him for it - eventually he'll start to walk in that position on his own as he learns that being there gets him wonderful treats. The more you take him out on leash, the faster he'll get the idea and then you can work on perfecting it. Generally, walking in a relaxed manner without pulling is the main thing you'll be teaching at a young age. This is all I expect of my pup, but when he walks at heel I treat and praise because this is what I ultimately want, but I can't expect him to do it for more than a few steps at a time.

    I wouldn't worry about where he eliminates for right now, because he won't be able to hold it very long. Even my 20 weeks old pup can barely hold it long enough to get to the first patch of grass he can reach. You can train going in the empty lot, but I think it's far more likely that the dog will just end up going in your yard unless you're willing to walk two doors down the many many times a day you will need to take a puppy outside.
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  4. #3
    Senior Member Poly's Avatar
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    Re: Leash training is house training is leash training...

    You start working on these as soon as you get your puppy home (crate training too). These are considered basic socialization.

    It's very easy to leash train a puppy. I like the 'drag line' method which I've described here many times. But there are many other approaches and they probably all work.

    House training : I use the "errorless housetraining" approach. That means taking your puppy out often during the day on a schedule as well as watching him closely so he makes a minmum of mistakes - rather then correcting the mistakes after he makes them. At first, he won't be able to walk very far so for the immediate future have a place in your yard where he can go.

    Don't combine his leash training, walkng , and house training. This is called "lumping" and it isn't a formula for success. Keep things separate until you and your dog have them down.

    Loose leash walking is the foundation. So you work on that. If you teach LLW properly, you can have your dog as close to you as you want and completely under your control. A LLW behavior is all you need. You don't need anything extra like tight heeling until- and only if- you get into other activities. That comes much, much later (meaning months later).

    I don't use a flexi for walking - don't see the need for it and I've had negative experiences using them on walks with large, boisterous dogs. You can incorporate breaks duriing your regular exercise walk when your dog can 'stop and smell the roses'. I'm sure someone else will give you the ins-and-outs of using them on a walk.

    I'd also suggest you start looking for off-leash facilities in your area. Your farm dogs got their exercise running arond on the farm, but you don't have that and your dog is going to need a lot of off-leash exercise as he grows. You can't take your puppy to interact with random dogs and their leavings until he has completed all his shots, but at some point not too far down the road your dog IS going to need a lot of exercise.


    Let us know how things are working out with your puppy
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  6. #4
    Senior Member wvasko's Avatar
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    Re: Leash training is house training is leash training...

    Well it's an 8 week old pup and I would just carry him to empty lot with a long lead at least 15/20 ft attached to collar. Put pup down and he can wander a bit with the long lead to do his duty and there is not a bunch of stress added with trying lead work while he is emptying out-. You are holding lead so he can't run away

    Doing it this way will start habit of doing the dumping etc habit in the empty lot. You can walk him back with lead work after he's done if you think that is important, last thing I worry about with an 8 week old pup is lead work. 1st and only thing I worry about is housebreaking, I can do lead work at any age.
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