Declawing a cat?
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Thread: Declawing a cat?

  1. #1
    Senior Member Daenerys's Avatar
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    Declawing a cat?

    So, we have two cats. One of them, Lucky, was found in the engine of my dad's car as a teeny 6-8 week old kitten. My dad trapped him in his garage and I caught him and took him home to live with me. However, we have two dogs and two cats in a one bedroom apartment. It's a bit crowded, but mostly livable. My brother has been asking to have Lucky ever since I took him home. My dad wouldn't allow it at his house, but my mom just bought a new townhouse and my brother is planning on moving in with her. My mom says he can have Lucky, but only if he gets him declawed. I am seriously considering giving Lucky to my brother, but I am unsure about having him declawed. On the one hand, growing up we had seven cats and every single one of them was declawed and completely fine. I have also seen first hand the damage that cat claws can do (and so has my mom, the previous owners of her new townhouse had cats and there is claw damage all over) and I completely understand why my mom doesn't want a cat with front claws. I feel like he'd be missing a part of himself. I think Lucky could be happier living with my mom and brother, because he would have a lot more room and their dogs aren't as "in your face" with cats as Faolan is. Our other cat, Jaylan, also tends to find Lucky annoying because she is calm and tends to nap all the time whereas Lucky prefers to be active and play. On the other hand, Lucky has had his claws for 2 years now and has been climbing furniture and the cat tree for those 2 years and I'd really hate to see him clawless. I would always be willing to take Lucky back if for some reason my brother or mom decide they don't want him anymore, but the whole condition that he has to be declawed really has me hesitating about letting them take him. Thoughts?

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  3. #2
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    Re: Declawing a cat?

    I'm totally against it. There's a reason it's illegal in pretty much every country other than the U.S. and Canada.

    www.declawing.com
    www.pawsneedclaws.com

  4. #3
    Senior Member lil_fuzzy's Avatar
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    Re: Declawing a cat?

    I consider declawing animal cruelty, and as mentioned, is illegal in most countries.

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    Re: Declawing a cat?

    Totally agree. Declawing a cat is the equivalent of cutting off a person's fingers to the first knuckle. It's barbaric.

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    Senior Member SydTheSpaniel's Avatar
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    Re: Declawing a cat?

    I'm also against declawing - as there's really no real benefit to it, and inhumane in all the senses of the word. Same reason I'm against pointless tail docking! Have you tried negotiating with your mother about the cat? Or is she firm on her conditions?

  7. #6
    Senior Member HollowHeaven's Avatar
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    Re: Declawing a cat?

    I am fully 100% against it and do consider it cruelty.
    I don't even compare it to cropping/docking. I put it far beyond that.

    You can get nail caps to put on cats. They cost money, but not a lot. And you do have to keep up with reapplying them, but it's not that difficult.
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  8. #7
    Senior Member Daenerys's Avatar
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    Re: Declawing a cat?

    Quote Originally Posted by SydTheSpaniel View Post
    I'm also against declawing - as there's really no real benefit to it, and inhumane in all the senses of the word. Same reason I'm against pointless tail docking! Have you tried negotiating with your mother about the cat? Or is she firm on her conditions?
    She is firm in her conditions. I told her that most countries have made it illegal or consider it inhumane/animal cruelty and that it has a high complication rate, but she thinks because we had 7 declawed cats and relatives have also had declawed cats and none of them ever had a problem with the surgery that it's completely fine.

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    Senior Member luv mi pets's Avatar
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    Re: Declawing a cat?

    I have 2 cats right now that are not declawed. I am lucky they both use the scratching post downstairs. I have had declawed cats in the past. The cats I own now were supposed to be barn cats and they decided that was not what they wanted. So they became housecats instead. Where I work we declaw a lot of cats. People try the glue-on and claim the glue-on do not stay on. They are hard to put on. Trying to keep the cat still long enough for the plastic to stay on the claw is the biggest complaint I hear. I have never tried the glue-on so I can not give you my review on them.
    My personal opinion is that I would prefer to see people declaw cats while they are younger (under a year old) Older cats, especially bigger fatter cats, tend to have a harder time recovering. Pain meds should not be an option but mandatory if you declaw your cat. I also, would only do the front feet and not all four. It seems to me that those owners who have leather furniture opt for the all four declaw.
    I would discuss with your vet what type of pain meds are offered and how your vet performs the surgery. How long the cat has to stay at the vets. What type of aftercare is needed.
    Front declawed cats still can climb trees, poles and other objects. They just can not do the shredding anymore with their front claws. Declawed cats should not be let outside alone. No cats, especially town cats, should be allowed to roam outside anyway. The outdoors is a dangerous place for cats whether they are declawed or not.
    After working at the shelter and now at a vets office, I would rather see people declaw their cat than to drop it off at the shelter or have it euthanized at the vet. Especially irritating getting rid of cat only because they are getting new furniture or carpet and the owner does not want the cat ruining the new pieces.
    I would try therapy but the couch was full!

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    Re: Declawing a cat?

    I would keep the cat, personally. I will agree with everyone else that declawing is inhumane. I have a houseful of fully clawed cats, and I consider any damage incurred from them is just part of owning them. They have scratching posts, but they also like the doorframes and wood furniture. I have a This End Up couch, though-it looks like it was made from shipping crates and is supposed to look "distressed" so it doesn't look too terrible-LOL. Those claws also serve to give my dogs a little pause when they think about getting in the cats' faces. Declawing can also lead cats to have behavioral problems like biting.

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    Re: Declawing a cat?

    I had a cat that came from the shelter declawed. I don't know what age he was done at-but that's a choice I would never make. I guess I'd rather see a cat declawed than euthanized, but people should realize that cats come with claws and they like to scratch. If they don't want to deal with that, they shouldn't get a cat in the first place.

  12. #11
    Senior Member Daenerys's Avatar
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    Re: Declawing a cat?

    I guess my brother will just have to be disappointed then because I tend to agree with you guys. Even though every declawed cat I have met has seemed like a normal healthy cat I don't want to put Lucky through that.

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    Re: Declawing a cat?

    I'd encourage him to adopt a cat who's already de-clawed from a shelter/private ad. Around here, there are lots of de-clawed cats needing homes. Probably similar there. I have 2 I'll send him .

  14. #13
    Senior Member Brydean's Avatar
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    Re: Declawing a cat?

    Not getting into the declaw debate. But can speak for the caps. It depends on the cat. I had one cat who never bothered them, she would leave them on to they grew off. I used them mainly for her back claws, she would scratch herself until she bled. I was ready to have her declawed, just to save her skin. But I found the caps and they were a lifesaver!
    Current cat will pull them off as soon as they were put on. Thankfully as long as he has a couple of pieces of cardboard laying around, he is happy to claw that!

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    Re: Declawing a cat?

    Quote Originally Posted by luv mi pets View Post
    No cats, especially town cats, should be allowed to roam outside anyway. The outdoors is a dangerous place for cats whether they are declawed or not.
    .
    Totally disagree. A cat is an instinctual animal and like a dog, it needs access to the sights and smells of the outdoors. It needs to jump, strop and yes, even hunt. Personally, I think that a cat kept exclusively indoors only has half a life. Most countries agree with me. I used to work at a UK shelter in London. You could not adopt a cat or kitten unless you passed a home visit. To pass a home visit you had to have a pet door with access to a private back yard. If you had no way for your cat to exit your house at will, you weren't allowed a cat. My cat would be utterly miserable if I never let her go outside, just the same as my dog would be.

  16. #15
    Senior Member luv mi pets's Avatar
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    Re: Declawing a cat?

    The reason I would not allow my cat just to roam about, people are mean to cats. They shoot them, poison them, have their dogs kill them. They can also be bait for coyotes, get hit by a car, are prey for hawks and owls and so on and so on. My one cat is leashed trained and loves to go outside while I am out there. My other cat has no desire to be outside. Her enjoyment to the outside is to lay in the open window with a screen for protection. Funny thing about her. I was supposed to euthanize her because she was considered a 'feral cat' and the shelter did not keep feral cats. She was live-trapped at a subdivision who had a large feral cat colony. I just coud not do it. She was a young female Siamese cat who's nose was marked up due to her trying to escape the trap. I told my boss she was not feral but boss was firm about the status of this cat. I marched right up to the office and adopted her. I figured if anything she could live out in my barn if she was truly a feral cat. She wanted no part in being an outside cat. I can leave the outside house door wide open and she will NOT go outside. Some feral cat she turned out to be.
    I would try therapy but the couch was full!

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    Re: Declawing a cat?

    Quote Originally Posted by Britbird View Post
    Totally disagree. A cat is an instinctual animal and like a dog, it needs access to the sights and smells of the outdoors. It needs to jump, strop and yes, even hunt. Personally, I think that a cat kept exclusively indoors only has half a life. Most countries agree with me. I used to work at a UK shelter in London. You could not adopt a cat or kitten unless you passed a home visit. To pass a home visit you had to have a pet door with access to a private back yard. If you had no way for your cat to exit your house at will, you weren't allowed a cat. My cat would be utterly miserable if I never let her go outside, just the same as my dog would be.
    wow the UK must have things under control. Some states in the US proposed having a "open hunting season" for cats. and most people voted for it. but it eventually got thrown out.

    I would never let my cat outside. NEVER. we have stray dogs. and cats . and its a danger zone out there. My neighbors cats just got picked off by the coyotes. and the disease out there! FIV FIP FELV. ALL of our indoor outdoor cats that come to our clinic have picked up one of them or 2.

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    Re: Declawing a cat?

    Well that's different. If you have a cat who prefers to stay inside, then fine. But what I object to is the large % of cats who never get the chance at all. And I don't think most people are mean to cats. My cat is the darling of the street, although most of the time she stays in the back yard, chewing grass and chasing butterflies. Cats are not defenseless animals, but if you chop their claws off and keep them confined to a house/apartment for their whole life that's what you turn them into.

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    Senior Member Brydean's Avatar
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    Re: Declawing a cat?

    Quote Originally Posted by Britbird View Post
    Totally disagree. A cat is an instinctual animal and like a dog, it needs access to the sights and smells of the outdoors. It needs to jump, strop and yes, even hunt. Personally, I think that a cat kept exclusively indoors only has half a life. Most countries agree with me. I used to work at a UK shelter in London. You could not adopt a cat or kitten unless you passed a home visit. To pass a home visit you had to have a pet door with access to a private back yard. If you had no way for your cat to exit your house at will, you weren't allowed a cat. My cat would be utterly miserable if I never let her go outside, just the same as my dog would be.
    I think you will find this is a cultural debate. I ran into it on a UK rabbit forum I used to frequent. Over there it seems it is considered cruel to keep a cat inside. Over here completely different. If you tell a rescue that your cat will be allowed outside, you will not be allowed to adopt. I think all rescues around here insist on inside cats. Just different perspectives on either side of the ocean!
    My cat is indoors and has no interest in going outside. I live on a 4 lane highway, I will never own an outside cat it is too dangerous.

  20. #19
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    Re: Declawing a cat?

    The UK and many other European countries have a whole different attitude about indoor/outdoor cats. I don't think tame cats should be allowed to run loose unsupervised, but at the same time, I wish the U.S. attitudes were more cat-friendly :/.

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    Re: Declawing a cat?

    Quote Originally Posted by Brydean View Post
    I think you will find this is a cultural debate. I ran into it on a UK rabbit forum I used to frequent. Over there it seems it is considered cruel to keep a cat inside. Over here completely different. If you tell a rescue that your cat will be allowed outside, you will not be allowed to adopt. I think all rescues around here insist on inside cats. Just different perspectives on either side of the ocean!
    My cat is indoors and has no interest in going outside. I live on a 4 lane highway, I will never own an outside cat it is too dangerous.
    I think it is cultural, but I have lived in the US for 5 years and my cat still goes outside here. She is not the only one, so obviously some of my US neighbors feel the same way. She is properly vaccinated, 14 years old and a picture of feline happiness.

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