Rottweiler or Doberman?
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Thread: Rottweiler or Doberman?

  1. #1
    Senior Member sillylilykitty's Avatar
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    Rottweiler or Doberman?

    Which do you think is the smarter or more aggressive? I have always tried to see which one is less aggressive. I have heard Rotties are less aggressive than the Dobie. Anyone know anything about the 2 breeds?

    These 2 breeds are similar, but what is the difference?
    Lily- 7 1/2 year old Siamese cat
    Luna- 4 year old Catahoula Leopard Dog mix


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    Senior Member xoxluvablexox's Avatar
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    Re: Rottweiler or Doberman?

    Someone told me that Dobermans don't live long because their brains keep growing even when their bodies have stopped growing. I don't think it's true, probably just told me that to keep me from getting one. If it is true then that's pretty sad. I'ed really like to know if it is though.

  4. #3
    Senior Member Snowshoe's Avatar
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    Re: Rottweiler or Doberman?

    I've heard that Rotties are more stable then dobies, but I have no idea where I heard it, or who told me.

    So, take that with a grain of salt.

    Redyre Rotties *hopefully* will see this post and come to your rescue!

    I also think that maybe Carla's mom had rotties...at least...I think she's posted as much on the forum elsewhere.

    Here, I found this for you:

    Your Purebred Puppy, Your Candid Guide to Dogs and Dog Breeds
    Purebred Dogs vs.
    Mixed Breed Dogs Which Dog Breed
    Is Best For You? 11 Things You Must Do
    Right To Keep Your Dog
    Healthy and Happy
    Advice You Can Trust:
    180 Dog Breed Reviews Teach Your Dog
    100 English Words Test Your Dog's IQ!

    Rottweilers: the most honest dog breed review you'll ever find. Information about Rottweiler personality and behavior.

    main page

    breed review

    faq

    health

    training

    adopting/buying

    links


    My book, Your Purebred Puppy: A Buyer's Guide (published by Henry Holt Your Purebred Puppy: A Buyer's Guide Co.), includes a full-page profile of the Rottweiler, including these excerpts:

    "The AKC Standard describes the Rottweiler as "a calm, confident, and courageous dog with a self-assured aloofness that does not lend itself to immediate and indiscriminate friendships."

    Steadfast and usually serious, the Rottweiler tends to respond quietly and with a wait-and-see attitude to influences in his environment.

    This muscular dog needs some space and exercise: brisk daily walks, interactive romping sessions, and regular opportunities to stretch out and run. Mental exercise (advanced obedience, agility, retrieving a ball, Schutzhund) is even more important and appreciated.

    Rottweilers must be thoroughly socialized at an early age so that their territorial instincts are controlled rather than indiscriminate.

    They can be aggressive with other dogs of the same sex, and some individuals are predatory with cats.

    Rottweilers are inclined to test for position in the family pecking order, but they will respect an assertive owner who knows how to lead a strong-minded dog.

    Overall, the Rottweiler is a splendid, capable companion in the right hands, but without ongoing companionship, socialization, obedience training, and supervision, he is too much dog."


    History
    Developed in Rottweil, Germany, he drove the butcher's cattle to and from market, pulled carts, and protected farm and family.


    Size
    22-27 inches and 80-130 lbs


    Rottweilers
    What's good about 'em
    What's bad about 'em

    * There are energetic Rottweilers, and placid Rottweilers.
    * Hard-headed Rottweilers, and sweet-natured Rottweilers.
    * Serious Rottweilers, and good-natured goofballs.
    * Introverted Rottweilers, and Rottweilers who love everyone.

    If you acquire a Rottweiler puppy, you can't know for sure what he or she will grow up to be like. Because a good number of purebred puppies do NOT grow up to conform to the "norm."


    Now let's look at some common characteristics for this breed...


    If you want a dog who...

    * Is large, stocky, muscular, and powerful
    * Is calm, steady-tempered, confident, and courageous
    * Is versatile -- when well-trained, can learn and do almost anything
    * Makes a fine watchdog and guardian

    A Rottweiler may be right for you.



    If you don't want to deal with...

    * An extremely careful search to avoid all the bad-tempered Rottweilers
    * A bulky dog who takes up a lot of space in your house and car
    * A heavy dog who wants to sit on your feet, lie on your lap, and lean his weight against your leg
    * Rowdiness and exuberant jumping, especially when young
    * Destructiveness when bored or not exercised enough
    * Providing enough socialization so their protectiveness doesn't become aggression
    * Aggression toward other animals -- chasing instincts
    * Strong-willed mind of his own, requiring a confident owner who can take charge
    * Slobbering and drooling
    * Gassiness (flatulence)
    * Shedding
    * Legal liabilities (public perception, future breed bans, insurance problems, increased chance of lawsuits)
    * A multitude of serious health problems and a short lifespan

    A Rottweiler may not be right for you.



    If I were considering a Rottweiler...

    My major concerns would be:

    1. Unstable temperaments. Rottweilers are a dime a dozen, and most of them are bred and offered for sale by people who don't have the slightest idea of how to breed good-tempered dogs. Obedience instructors and behavioral consultants see LOTS of Rottweilers who are dangerously sharp, aggressive, or fearful.

    2. Providing the proper balance of exercise. Young Rottweilers need enough exercise to keep them lean and healthy, but not so much that their soft growing bones, joints, and ligaments become over-stressed and damaged. Adult Rottweilers need more exercise to keep them in shape, but not in hot or humid weather for fear of overheating.

    Since you have to minimize their exercise, young Rottweilers can be very rambunctious. They will romp with uncoordinated gawkiness all over your house. You need to substitute extra quantities of companionship and supervision. Otherwise, left alone, young Rottweilers become bored and destructive -- and their powerful jaws can literally destroy your living room.

    If you simply want a pet for your family, and don't have the time or inclination to take your dog running or hiking or biking or swimming, or to get involved in advanced obedience, or agility (obstacle course), or schutzhund (protection), or tracking, or pulling a cart or sled, or a similar canine activity, I do not recommend this breed.

    3. Providing enough socialization. Most Rottweilers have protective instincts toward strangers. They need extensive exposure to friendly people so they learn to recognize the normal behaviors of "good guys." Then they can recognize the difference when someone acts abnormally. Without careful socialization, they may be suspicious of everyone, which could lead to biting. Some Rottweilers go in the opposite direction -- without enough socialization, they become fearful of strangers, which can lead to defensive biting.

    If you have small children, I do not recommend a Rottweiler. Young Rottweilers (up to about three years old) can be bulls in a china shop. When they romp and jump, they do so with great vigor, and things can go flying, including people. In addition, Rottweilers may try to protect their own children from other children, which could lead to tragedy if kids are simply roughhousing and your Rottweiler decides to stop it. With such a massive dog, I wouldn't take the risk.

    4. Animal aggression. Many Rottweilers will not tolerate another dog of the same sex, and some won't tolerate the opposite sex either. Some Rottweilers have strong instincts to chase and seize cats and other fleeing creatures. If anything goes wrong in the breeding, socializing, training, handling, or management of this breed, it is capable of seriously injuring or killing other animals.

    5. The strong temperament. Rottweilers are not Golden Retrievers. The best Rottweilers are versatile working dogs, capable of learning a great deal, but they are not pushovers to raise and train. Some Rottweilers are willful, obstinate, and dominant (they want to be the boss) and will make you prove that you can make them do things. You must show them, through absolute consistency, that you mean what you say.

    To teach your Rottweiler to listen to you, "Respect Training" is mandatory. My Rottweiler Training Page discusses the program you need.

    6. Shedding. Rottweilers shed more than you might think. Their short, coarse hairs come off on your hands when you pet them, and stick tenaciously to your carpeting, upholstery, and clothing.

    7. Slobbering. Some Rottweilers, especially large males with loose jowls, tend to slobber or drool, especially after eating and drinking.

    8. Gassiness (flatulence) that can send you running for cover. Fortunately, Rottweilers who are fed a natural diet of real meat and other fresh foods have much less trouble with gassiness. See my Rottweiler Health Page for more information.

    9. Serious health problems. The Rottweiler is one of the riskiest of all breeds in the health department. Their lifespan has become short -- an alarming number of Rottweilers are crippled by bone and joint diseases and/or succumb to cancer or heart disease in middle age.

    To keep this breed healthy, I strongly recommend following all of the advice on my Rottweiler Health Page.

    10. Legal liabilities. Rottweilers may be targeted for "banning" in certain areas, or refusal of homeowner insurance policies. Your friends and neighbors may be uncomfortable around this breed. In this day and age, the legal liabilities of owning any breed that looks intimidating and has a history as a guard dog should be seriously considered. People are quicker to sue if such a dog does anything even remotely questionable.

    Frankly, most Rottweilers are "too much dog" for the average household. Very few people really have the knowledge or skills necessary to manage this breed or to provide the activities that keep him satisfied.



    If you're considering an adult Rottweiler...

    There are plenty of adult Rottweilers who have already proven themselves NOT to have negative characteristics. If you find such an adult, don't let "typical breed negatives" worry you.

    When you acquire a puppy, you're acquiring potential -- what he one day will be. So "typical breed characteristics" are very important. But when you acquire an adult, you're acquiring what he already IS.



    Copyright © 2000-2006 by Michele Welton. All rights reserved. No part of this website may be reproduced without the permission of the author.
    Last edited by Snowshoe; 05-07-2007 at 07:46 PM. Reason: Automerged Doublepost

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    Re: Rottweiler or Doberman?

    What ever you pick take you rtime and find a good breeder with a good contract it will be worth it in the long run! Good luck

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    Senior Member Snowshoe's Avatar
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    Re: Rottweiler or Doberman?

    Doberman Pinscher, including these excerpts:

    "This athletic dog needs brisk walking every day and all-out running as often as possible. Too little exercise and too little companionship can lead to restlessness and other behavioral problems.

    Mental exercise (advanced obedience, agility, tracking, Schutzhund) is just as important to this thinking breed.

    Though some Doberman Pinschers are big softies who love everyone, most are reserved with strangers and protective of their family. Early and extensive socialization is mandatory to avoid either shyness or sharpness.

    Some Doberman Pinschers are dominant with other dogs. Some are confirmed cat chasers, while others love small animals.

    Some excel in advanced obedience competition, while others are hardheaded and will test to find their place in the pecking order.

    Calm, consistent leadership is a must, and obedience training must be upbeat and persuasive rather than sharp. This breed does not tolerate teasing or mischief."


    History
    The Doberman Pinscher (also spelled Dobermann Pinscher) was developed in Germany by Louis Dobermann as a guard and military dog.


    Size
    24-28 inches and 60-85 lbs


    Doberman Pinschers
    What's good about 'em
    What's bad about 'em

    If you want a dog who...

    * Is large and strong, yet sleek- and elegant-looking
    * Has a short easy-care coat
    * Thrives on exercise, athletic activities, and challenging things to do
    * Looks serious and imposing, so makes an effective deterrent even when friendly

    A Doberman Pinscher may be right for you.



    If you don't want to deal with...

    * An extra careful search to avoid dangerous lines
    * Providing enough exercise to keep him satisfied
    * Rowdiness and exuberant jumping, especially when young
    * Aggression, sharpness, suspiciousness, or shyness when not socialized enough
    * Aggression toward other animals
    * Emotional sensitivity to stress and loud voices
    * Physical sensitivity (tendency to react defensively when startled or mishandled)
    * Shedding
    * A multitude of serious health problems
    * Legal liabilities (public perception, future breed bans, insurance problems, increased chance of lawsuits)

    A Dobermann Pinscher may not be right for you.



    If I were considering a Doberman Pinscher...

    My major concerns would be:

    1. Unstable temperaments. Doberman Pinschers are a dime a dozen, and most of them are bred and offered for sale by people who don't have the slightest idea of how to breed good-tempered dogs. Obedience instructors and behavioral consultants see LOTS of Doberman Pinschers with neurotic behaviors, including aggression and biting, extreme fearfulness, and hyperactivity.

    2. Providing enough exercise and mental stimulation. Doberman Pinschers MUST have regular opportunities to vent their energy and do interesting things. Otherwise they will become rambunctious and bored -- which they usually express by barking and destructive chewing. Bored Doberman Pinschers can make a shambles of your house and yard.

    If you simply want a pet for your family, and don't have the time or inclination to take your dog running or hiking or biking or swimming, or to get involved in agility (obstacle course), or advanced obedience, or tracking, or schutzhund (protection), or a similar canine activity, I do not recommend this breed.

    3. Providing enough socialization. Many Dobermann Pinschers have protective instincts toward strangers. They need extensive exposure to friendly people so they learn to recognize the normal behaviors of "good guys." Then they can recognize the difference when someone acts abnormally. Without careful socialization, they may be suspicious of everyone, which could lead to biting. Some Dobermans go in the opposite direction -- without enough socialization, they become fearful of strangers, which can lead to defensive biting.

    To teach your Doberman to listen to you, "Respect Training" is mandatory. My Doberman Pinscher Training Page discusses the program you need.

    4. Animal aggression. Some Doberman Pinschers are dominant or aggressive toward other dogs of the same sex. Many have strong instincts to chase and seize cats and other fleeing creatures. If anything goes wrong in the breeding, socializing, training, handling, or management of this breed, it is capable of seriously injuring or killing other animals.

    5. Emotional sensitivity. Be honest...is there tension in your home? Are people loud or angry or emotional? Are there arguments or fights? Doberman Pinschers are extremely sensitive to stress and can end up literally sick to their stomachs, with digestive upsets and nervous behaviors, if the people in their home are having family problems.

    If you have small children, I do not recommend a Doberman Pinscher. First, young Dobermanns (up to about two years old) romp and jump with great vigor, and things can go flying, including people. Second, Doberman Pinschers may try to protect their own children from other children, which could lead to tragedy if kids are simply roughhousing and your Doberman decides to stop it. Finally, there are just too many Dobermans who feel overwhelmed by the loud voices and quick movements that children can't help making -- and stress and shyness (even defensive biting) may be the result.

    6. Shedding. Doberman Pinschers shed more than you might think. Their short coarse hairs come off on your hands when you pet them, and stick tenaciously to your carpeting, upholstery, and clothing.

    7. Extremely high prices. Some breeders are charging over $1500 for a Doberman puppy. In my opinion, this is absolutely absurd and I wouldn't even consider supporting prices like this.

    8. Serious health problems. In the health department, Doberman Pinschers are extremely risky. An alarming number of Dobermans die of heart disease and cancer at an early age.

    To keep this breed healthy, I strongly recommend following all of the advice on my Doberman Pinscher Health Page.

    9. Legal liabilities. Doberman Pinschers may be targeted for "banning" in certain areas, or refusal of homeowner insurance policies. Your friends and neighbors may be uncomfortable around this breed. In this day and age, the legal liabilities of owning any breed that looks intimidating and has a history as a guard dog should be seriously considered. People are quicker to sue if such a dog does anything even remotely questionable.

    Frankly, most Doberman Pinschers are "too much dog" for the average household. Very few people really have the knowledge or skills necessary to manage this breed, or to provide the activities that keep him satisfied.



    Not all Doberman Pinschers are alike!

    * There are energetic Dobermans, and placid Dobermans.
    * Hard-headed Dobermans, and sweet-natured Dobermans.
    * Serious Dobermans, and good-natured goofballs.
    * Introverted Dobermans, and Dobermans who love everyone.

    If you acquire a Doberman Pinscher puppy, you can't know for sure what he or she will grow up to be like. Because a good number of purebred puppies do NOT grow up to conform to the "norm."


    If you're considering an adult Doberman Pinscher...

    There are plenty of adult Doberman Pinschers who have already proven themselves NOT to have negative characteristics. If you find such an adult, don't let "typical breed negatives" worry you.

    When you acquire a puppy, you're acquiring potential -- what he one day will be. So "typical breed characteristics" are very important. But when you acquire an adult, you're acquiring what he already IS.



    Copyright © 2000-2006 by Michele Welton. All rights reserved. No part of this website may be reproduced without the permission of the author.

  7. #6
    Senior Member Laurelin's Avatar
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    Re: Rottweiler or Doberman?

    Quote Originally Posted by xoxluvablexox View Post
    Someone told me that Dobermans don't live long because their brains keep growing even when their bodies have stopped growing. I don't think it's true, probably just told me that to keep me from getting one. If it is true then that's pretty sad. I'ed really like to know if it is though.
    Yeah... not true...

    I personally love both breeds, but I think I'd be better suited to owning a rottie. They're wonderful dogs. Dobes are also just plain gorgeous animals.
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    Re: Rottweiler or Doberman?

    Quote Originally Posted by sillylilykitty View Post
    Which do you think is the smarter or more aggressive? I have always tried to see which one is less aggressive. I have heard Rotties are less aggressive than the Dobie. Anyone know anything about the 2 breeds?

    These 2 breeds are similar, but what is the difference?
    Their built different and from the ones that I have known Rotties don't have as much fear as Dobies.

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    Senior Member Chloef_2799's Avatar
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    Re: Rottweiler or Doberman?

    If I had to chooe a rottie or a dob I would choose a dobe. I like their look more then the rotties. But I know several of both and they are wonderful dogs. You HAVE TO HAVE TO HAVE TO socialize them ALOT and you also have to keep them busy with long walks, lots of exercise and mental stimulation. A friend of my boyfriends has a rottie and when they first brought him home he chewed a hole in the living room wall. It was about 6 foot wide by 3 foot tall, he chewed away the drywall, puled out the insulation and was actually chewing on the 2 by 4 studs!!!!! Luckily they got home in time to stop him because I can't imagine what would have happened if he bit a wire....poor Duke! They have since fixed the wall and duke is put into the kitchen with his food and toys when they leave now.
    And my boyfriend used to have a doberman and if they were out of the house for more than six hours someone had to come and let the dog out because he would go nutso and chew everything in sight and mess in the house.
    ruff....riff riff...bark bark bark growl....ruff growl!
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    Senior Member xoxluvablexox's Avatar
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    Re: Rottweiler or Doberman?

    Quote Originally Posted by Laurelin View Post
    Yeah... not true...

    I personally love both breeds, but I think I'd be better suited to owning a rottie. They're wonderful dogs. Dobes are also just plain gorgeous animals.
    Yeah, I really didn't think it was. That's sick that someone told me that to keep me from getting one. Pretty pathetic but whatever.
    I love both but Dobies are my favorite.

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    Senior Member sillylilykitty's Avatar
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    Re: Rottweiler or Doberman?

    Thanks for all the replys. They are so darn similar! Looks like they both have VERY similar characteristics. Im still not sure which I like better, Im in a rush right now so I will come back and look at all that information later probably tomorrow.
    Lily- 7 1/2 year old Siamese cat
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    Senior Member Chloef_2799's Avatar
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    Re: Rottweiler or Doberman?

    sillylilykitty Thanks for all the replys. They are so darn similar! Looks like they both have VERY similar characteristics. Im still not sure which I like better, Im in a rush right now so I will come back and look at all that information later probably tomorrow.

    Well I would say they are similar in temperament, certain colouration (black and tan) and size (BIG DAWGS!) but they are different in build and the way they are built. Rotties are more bully looking and alot bulkier and they have the huge muscular beefy bodies. But dobes are tall, slim and very athletic looking and they can have different colours as well. If I had to give an example I would say rotties are built like bulls and dobbies are built like gazelles.
    An aquaintance of mine has two dobes a red one (I don't know the actualy name for the colouration, but she is carmel and red with a lite brownish nose) and her other dobe is a white one (he was a rescue). But I have never seen rotties with any other colours than black and tan.
    ruff....riff riff...bark bark bark growl....ruff growl!
    Doggish for DARN YOU SQUIRRELS.....ONE DAY I SHALL HAVE MY REVENGE!!!

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    Senior Member sillylilykitty's Avatar
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    Re: Rottweiler or Doberman?

    Oh, change of plans im back already! But yeah, I know the difference in looks, its the personality im talking about, im not sure which one is best suited for me and Lily, personality wise. Of course im not sure if I would actually get one, I would like to be able to tell people the difference besides looks and besides my personal experience. I have only met 2 dobies no rotties and both dobies were viscous at obedience class. One was muzzled (with the smarter owner) the other not muzzled (with the stupid owner) and it was the one that killed a little maltese dog (during a class!).

    I know I have met very poor examples of the Doberman breed, another reason why I want to know what they should act like.

    Anyone own one of these breeds?
    Last edited by sillylilykitty; 05-07-2007 at 09:02 PM.
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  14. #13
    Senior Member Laurelin's Avatar
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    Re: Rottweiler or Doberman?

    Well, maybe the best thing to ask is why are you interested in these two breeds in the first place? What qualities do you want/need in a dog?
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  15. #14
    Senior Member ScareCrow's Avatar
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    Re: Rottweiler or Doberman?

    My in laws raised Rottweilers for a long time and still have two as pets. My wifes aunt also had a Doberman so I've had experience being around both breeds, although it is limited to an extent. From what I've seen, the Doberman is much more protective, especially around strangers. When my wife and I first started dating I couldn't walk in the backyard by myself because the Rottweilers would have ripped me apart but if I went back there with my wife they were fine and playful. When I went to visit with my wife's aunt it was a different story, I hated that dog. I couldn't hold my wifes hand, make any sudden movements, or do anything else that might make that dog think I was in the wrong. It took a really long time of me being around for that Doberman to accept me as part of the family and allow me to be comfortable, the Rottweilers took to me pretty fast though.

    I would have a personal issue adopting an adult Doberman because of my past experiences with the dog and how long it took for the one to accept me. I wouldn't have a problem adopting an adult Rottweiler though or getting a Doberman as a puppy. I wouldn't suggest a Doberman unless you are the type that rarely has company, the one I've had experience was well socialized outside the house but not very nice to strangers in his domain.
    “They that can give up essential liberty to obtain a little safety deserve neither liberty nor safety.”
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    Senior Member sillylilykitty's Avatar
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    Re: Rottweiler or Doberman?

    Quote Originally Posted by Laurelin View Post
    Well, maybe the best thing to ask is why are you interested in these two breeds in the first place? What qualities do you want/need in a dog?
    I am interested because I like big strong dogs. I like that they are protective. But I would rather have a too little protective dog than too much protective. Maybe these 2 breeds are too aggressive for me, I have a cat and she is more important than the new dog if you know what I mean (shes there first).

    Hmmm I dont know, I guess I feel kinda lost in the dog world without having a favorite breed. I have my favorite cat breeds, but dogs are a much more serious commitment, maybe I should be asking for suggestions for the "perfect" (I know there is no real perfect) breed for me.
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  17. #16
    Senior Member xoxluvablexox's Avatar
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    Re: Rottweiler or Doberman?

    You want a protective dog that basically describes a lot of different breeds. As long as your part of there family they're going to be there to help you against someone trying to do you harm. Goldern Retreivers have been known to gaurd there family against a robber. It all depends on how much protection you want. If you want a dog that is capable of killing someone trying to do you harm then a Pitbull, Rottie, Dobie and a few other breeds would probably be good enough to do the job. If you want a family orientaded dog that would protect you when need be but be able enough to be around strangers then there are dogs like the GSD, Lab, and Golden Retriever. Honestly I think dogs can sense when someone is a pottential threat so as long as you have a well sized dog with teeth you have a dog that can protect you when need be.

  18. #17
    Senior Member Alpha's Avatar
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    Re: Rottweiler or Doberman?

    They are somewhat similar when you look at what they were bred for.

    Rottweilers were first off, cattle dogs. Hence, their "independent" attitude. Then, and mostly now a days, used as protection dogs. Doberman's were firstly and lastly bred for human protection by Louis Dobermann. I believe I had read somewhere that Rottweilers did go into the making of the Doberman, but you may never know. I forget where I had read... I think German Pinschers were on the list somwhere too...

    I think either breed can be stable, with responsible breeding and proper socialization, but I would lean more towards Rottweilers if forced to choose which would be MORE stable.

    Personally, I prefer Doberman's to Rottweilers APPEARANCE wise and have met some brilliant Dobes in the obedience ring. The few I've met in comparison to the tonne of Goldens and labs you see in obedience, outshone them by far. A woman I've spoken with over the internet also has two obedience/agility dobes, absolutely gorgeous, hard working creatures. Intelligent is the first word I would use to describe them.

    Roxy, who is half rottweiler half dobe, is quite a handful at that. She does have a "Doberman" personality, quite high strung and nervous. Although, much of her unstable personality is due to genetics. Not every Rott or Dobe will be like Roxy, but from owning a mix first hand, she is/was overly protective. Quite a handful to say the least.

    There are a tonne of breeds out there, large dogs, that are also similar in appearance if that's something that attracted to the Rott or Dobe that in general, aren't as much of a handful.

    Going to a site like dogbreedinfo, which have pretty much every breed you can imagine, and going through the pictures, and somewhat educational information may give you a better idea

    If you go there make sure to check out Hades picture in the American Pitbull Terrier picture page He he!

    http://www.dogbreedinfo.com/purebred.htm

  19. #18
    Senior Member sillylilykitty's Avatar
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    Re: Rottweiler or Doberman?

    A family dog that is able to protect but more of a family dog would be perfect. I guess that crosses out the dobe and rottie since they are bred to protect.

    I like the GSD! I have one problem with them that I have heard of. They have many health problems. But is that not a problem if you go to an excellent breeder?
    Lily- 7 1/2 year old Siamese cat
    Luna- 4 year old Catahoula Leopard Dog mix


  20. #19
    Senior Member xoxluvablexox's Avatar
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    Re: Rottweiler or Doberman?

    Health problems can always be a problem even with the best of dogs. Going to a good breeder and making sure all necasary health testing was done is the best thing you can do to make sure your dog is less likely to get health problems. Then again you could look into getting a one from a GSD rescue. I think that there is even a chance you could get a police dog. Sometimes the dogs they put through training aren't good enough to be police dogs. They're good for protecting but also safe enough to be in a family home. You could look into that too if you wanted.

  21. #20
    Senior Member Laurelin's Avatar
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    Re: Rottweiler or Doberman?

    Well, if you're not really sure what you want, then one of the best things I can tell you is to try to go to a dog show and meet some of the breeds in person. It's a great way to see a lot of dogs of different breeds and to talk to people involved in those breeds.
    Mia CGC - (5 year old papillon)
    Summer TG2 TBAD - (10 year old papillon)

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