Adopting a Retired Stud?
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Thread: Adopting a Retired Stud?

  1. #1
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    Adopting a Retired Stud?

    I'm looking into adopting a retired stud dog. I've never had a male dog, let alone a retired stud. Can I expect any behavior problems from a retired stud (ie, inappropriate interaction with a human leg - if you get my drift)? Any advise and/or opinions on this subject is greatly appreciated.

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  3. #2
    Senior Member Dogstar's Avatar
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    Re: Adopting a Retired Stud?

    Totally depends on the dog and the training he's recieved. Sorry, I know that's not very definitive. But it really does.

  4. #3
    Senior Member wabanafcr's Avatar
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    Re: Adopting a Retired Stud?

    Dogstar is right. My boys, even the most active stud, are not allowed to exhibit marking and humping behaviors when it is inappropriate. They are good boys, with rules, especially in the house, and their interactions with people and with other animals are the same as those of my neutered dogs. I have placed retired stud dogs in pet homes with no problems at all.

    Not all breeders teach their stud dogs manners, though. A while ago, we picked up a stud dog of another breed to deliver to a friend, and the short time that I spent with that dog was frustrating, as he had been allowed to get away with some behaviors that I find unacceptable--he was marking everything (we made him sleep crated in the car, as we didn't trust to bring him in the house) and kicking after each time. He was on his toes when he saw other dogs, growling. He was simply a jerk because he had never been told he had to behave.

    It all depends on the dog, the training and the previous owner.

  5. #4
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    Re: Adopting a Retired Stud?

    My mom recently got a "he hates the show ring" retired show dog. He previously lived in more of a kennel situation than a home situation so his house manners weren't all that great. He tried to mark, but within just a few weeks he was doing just fine in the house. The training was just the basic crate/tether/eagle eyes stuff you'd do with a new puppy, or any new dog really.

    Some dogs will be more stubborn about it. But if you think about it, very few male rescues would be placed if these things couldn't be trained out. Most of them come into rescue intact, and have surely mated in their lives. And maybe you'll get lucky and the breeder was one like Wabana who teaches impeccable manners

  6. #5
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    Re: Adopting a Retired Stud?

    Thanks to everyone who replied. I have been told this male is very gentle and affectionate. You have given me great things to discuss with the breeder.

    Thank you!

  7. #6
    Senior Member wabanafcr's Avatar
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    Re: Adopting a Retired Stud?

    Quote Originally Posted by Priss and Pedro's Mama View Post
    And maybe you'll get lucky and the breeder was one like Wabana who teaches impeccable manners
    Oh, geez, definitely not impeccable manners. They can be extremely naughty! But they don't get to act like testosterone-poisoned jerks! There is just plain naughtiness (stealing food off the counter, getting underwear out of the laundry and running through the house with it, jumping on your human when they are dressed up for something important and want to stay clean, etc.), and then there are unacceptable behaviors (marking in the house, humping humans, etc.)!

  8. #7
    Senior Member briteday's Avatar
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    Re: Adopting a Retired Stud?

    We recently (Oct.) acquired a retired bitch. She came with a spay agreement due to her age. Once she was acclimated to our household the breeder made arrangements for her spay with his vet.

    There were the normal incidents of establishing hierarchy with the other two dogs, one of which we have had for 8 years and is her littermate. The only real issue we've had to deal with is her desire to hear her own voice, all the time! We have really had to work on this one. It is incredibly annoying.

    Otherwise she has been a wonderful addition to the family and it's been fun having such a nice representation of the breed.
    Being smart is learning from your own mistakes. Being wise is learning from others' mistakes.
    Cally- 14 yo papillon, Moose the puppy, McKenna 8 yo pomeranian grand-dog, and chickens

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