How long will it take to settle? What should I not do too early?
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Thread: How long will it take to settle? What should I not do too early?

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    How long will it take to settle? What should I not do too early?

    I got an 8 week old Border Collie mix on Thursday. How long does it take to "settle" long enough in the house to begin:

    training such as sit, come, lay down, etc.

    Isolating the dog to her sealed off hallway and ignoring her crying.

    What kind of things should I not be doing before the "settling" is over?

    PS. She doesn't seem to want to engage with toys, and she doesn't look up at me in the face. Is that a sign it's too soon to try and train?
    Last edited by Chikyuu; 05-02-2010 at 01:34 PM. Reason: PS

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    Re: How long will it take to settle? What should I not do too early?

    I don't wait for any settling period. I start training the second the dog is in my house.

    That includes confinement or crate training, though I only train it for a few minutes during the day and then at night. I don't confine/crate during the day for no reason.

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    Re: How long will it take to settle? What should I not do too early?

    So I can isolate her in the hallway with her bed, toys, water, and if she cries out I just have to leave her alone and ignore her until it stops? Should I do it a couple times a day?

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    Re: How long will it take to settle? What should I not do too early?

    This is a welcome letter I have written for one of my rescues for their new fosters and how to manage their new foster dog the first week they're with them:

    Your New Foster, the First 48
    Introduce the dog to your home.
    Meet all the family members, including pets. Keep introductions short and low key and one at a time with breaks in-between meetings to allow your foster dog to process the information. When introducing to other pets always be prepared for the worst and try to anticipate negative situations before they occur.
    - Donít set up your new foster for failure by giving him things like rawhide bones, extra treats or other ďcompetition itemsĒ before learning your new dogís temperament. Does he guard resources, is he food aggressive, toy aggressive, until you know donít expect heíll have good manners with your resident pets over high value items such as toys, bones, treats, etc. Give your foster treat items in a gated dog safe room or in his crate (if crate training is reasonable and implemented properly). Your foster dog shouldnít be made to feel like he has to defend prize items. He should be permitted the opportunity to enjoy them in peace. This management avoids resource guarding.
    Once introduced into your home everyone basically needs to ignore the dog for the first 48 hours. Feed him, familiarize him with your home but try to have as minimal interaction as needed to manage daily life skills such as potty breaks, feeding, and brushing, walking, basic necessities. Do not try to play with the dog or train him in these first 48 hours. This time should be spent letting the dog adjust and learn you and his new surroundings. Vigorous play with a dog that is already stressed and in a new environment with people he doesnít really know can result in anxiety biting or fear responses to over stimulation. Let him approach you and initiate interaction. It is always suggested you have a space in the house that your new foster can retreat to when he is feeling overwhelmed.
    -Whether itís his crate, a dog bed or random blanket on the floor that he likes. Respect his space when he is in a retreat zone. Do not force interaction. Make sure there are several different areas of your home where your foster can retreat and relax undisturbed. Section off certain areas of the house with baby gates or close doors to make sure your new foster canít get into trouble and is always with in sight.
    Introductions with pets already in the house requires a little tact and good management so that we donít upset the resident pet or over stress the new foster. It is NEVER recommended that you leave your foster dog and your existing pet alone unsupervised in the home at ANY time. Always separate the animals by crating, gating, or closing doors to prevent tragic accidents. For the first week supervise interactions between your current pet and your foster dog. Separate them with baby gates when they canít be watched 100% of the time even if youíre in the home. Make sure you feed in separate areas until you know if your foster dog or current pet is going to be food aggressive to prevent accidental fights. Feed on a schedule the properly measured food ration assigned for your foster dog.
    -Keep play session with your foster and current pet short in the beginning. No more than 15 minutes at a time before you separate them and insist on a rest period. This way we can prevent the animals from getting over excited and potentially causing an altercation.
    Lastly we ask that with in the first 48 hours of having your new foster that you fill out our New Foster Bio Form. Answer each question to the best of your ability so that the other members of our staff can handle inquiries from potential adopters with out disrupting our foster familiesí lives too much. It will be expected of you to speak with potential adopters on occasion if their request for information is more than what is provided in the dogís bio, or to discuss their potential to fulfill your foster dogís needs. Your cooperation in this endeavor is greatly appreciated.

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    Re: How long will it take to settle? What should I not do too early?

    Yeah, a couple of a times a day put her in there and treat her consistently if she's being quiet, or wait her crying out then treat when she'ss quiet again.

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    Re: How long will it take to settle? What should I not do too early?

    I have to comment that I think an older dog introduction like a foster or rescue is a lot different than a young puppy, and I don't think the situations should be handled the same. Obviously that's just my opinion.

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    Re: How long will it take to settle? What should I not do too early?

    Quote Originally Posted by DJEtzel View Post
    Yeah, a couple of a times a day put her in there and treat her consistently if she's being quiet, or wait her crying out then treat when she'ss quiet again.
    I'll have to get some earplugs for my parents since they need sleep for work, and my Mom works graveyard shift.

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    Re: How long will it take to settle? What should I not do too early?

    Definitely ignore the crying/barking when left alone. My pup used to do that constantly when I first brought him home. I just shut my door and watched some movies and eventually he got used to being alone.

    It's really normal for puppies to cry or bark when they're alone--it's a genetic programming that makes sure they don't get lost in the wild. I'd get those earplugs for your parents, lol. Or maybe leave your pup in a room that's really far from your parents' bedroom so that the sound is muffled a bit..
    Lucidity's Papillons & Cavaliers

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    Re: How long will it take to settle? What should I not do too early?

    Quote Originally Posted by Chikyuu View Post
    I'll have to get some earplugs for my parents since they need sleep for work, and my Mom works graveyard shift.
    Along with earplugs, putting a ticking clock, warm water bottle, and a shirt that you've worn in the area with her can help calm her down sometimes. And sleeping nearby helps too. Generally puppies don't want to be alone, so the closer you are, the more secure they feel.

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    Re: How long will it take to settle? What should I not do too early?

    Quote Originally Posted by DJEtzel View Post
    Along with earplugs, putting a ticking clock, warm water bottle, and a shirt that you've worn in the area with her can help calm her down sometimes. And sleeping nearby helps too. Generally puppies don't want to be alone, so the closer you are, the more secure they feel.
    My parents told me about the ticking clock. I have a really simple slow-ticking clock that I put next to her crate and I think she likes it

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    Re: How long will it take to settle? What should I not do too early?

    Play classical music too. It's been proven to calm the nerves and I've seen it work. Dogs love Mozart.

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    Re: How long will it take to settle? What should I not do too early?

    Quote Originally Posted by Dog_Shrink View Post
    Play classical music too. It's been proven to calm the nerves and I've seen it work. Dogs love Mozart.
    Oh really? Nice, music DOES soothe the savage beast

    First I learn about bread from you and now music.

    *goes and looks for Mozart MP3s*

    Wally's latent learning position.

    Believe in yourself, be the type of dog owner you want to be and you wonít need labels." - Dr. Abrantes

    "I hear, I know. I see, I remember. I do, I understand. " -Confucious says why I love shaping in a sentence.

    "Once you've entered the battle, you've already lost." -Amaryllis' mom on dog and child training.

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    Re: How long will it take to settle? What should I not do too early?

    Frag likes metal music.

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    Re: How long will it take to settle? What should I not do too early?

    Frag definitely goes against the norm then

    "Two recent studies have shown that the behavior of dogs can be affected by the type of music they are hearing.

    When a team of researchers led by Deborah Wells, an animal behaviorist employed by Queens University in Belfast, Northern Island, exposed 50 dogs in an animal shelter to Vivaldis, The Four Seasons, Greigs Morning and other classical pieces, the dogs became calm and laid down.

    When the researchers played music by Metallica and other heavy metal bands, the dogs became agitated and began barking.

    Pop music and radio talk shows seemed to have little effect.

    A similar research project conducted at the Rehoming Center of the National Canine Defense League in Evesham, England yielded comparable results.

    "It is well established that music can influence our moods," said Wells. "Dogs may be as discerning as humans when it comes to music."

    "Dogs have a taste in musical styles just as people do," said Alison Jaskiewicz, cofounder of the Canine Freestyle Federation, which is dedicated to broadening the scope of dog training by adding choreography to it. "If you move dogs to different types of music, you will see their preferences reflected in their bodies, in their eagerness to move, in their tail set, in their ear set, etc."

    An Arizona Animal Welfare League has started playing classical music to calm animals at its no-kill shelter.

    The music comes courtesy of Scottsdale residents Scott Goldberg and Hannah Romberg, who paid for the installation and service for the Muzak system that provides the music continuously via satellite, said Cheryl Weiner, the league's Vice President.

    A United Kingdom study published in the journal Animal Welfare revealed that shelter animals overwhelmingly spend more time in a relaxed state when exposed to classical music.

    Goldberg said he noticed the calming effect of music on his two cats and two dogs, and he wanted to extend the service to the shelter animals.

    There are other benefits.

    "The dogs bark less and are more relaxed when people visit the shelter," Weiner said. "Visitors stay longer and spend more time with animals, so more may be adopted."



    This News Report has been provided by the Animal News Center, Inc. ©2003
    Animal News Center, Inc. http://www.anc.org"

    http://www.eternalanimals.com/Dogs_S...t_To_Music.htm

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    Re: How long will it take to settle? What should I not do too early?

    That is strange. I knew classical music generally had a calming effect, but I didn't know there was a negative effect to metal music and the like. Frag's never exhibited any adverse behavior to it though. He doesn't mind classical music, but my boyfriend is a metal head and Frag loves laying in bed with him listening to music through the night.

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    Re: How long will it take to settle? What should I not do too early?

    That's like my 14 year old son. When I was pregnant with him I use to put the headphones on my belly and play him metallica and zeppelin and now he loves both sometimes it's all about proper exposure at just that right age. Works for canines and kids

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    Re: How long will it take to settle? What should I not do too early?

    Y'know what's weird, River can sleep in her crate while my Mom across the house blasts her classic rock. Lol. Same as me, when I was little in the car I could fall asleep to Rob Zombie.

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    Re: How long will it take to settle? What should I not do too early?

    That definitely makes sense.

    I have however seen firsthand what classical music can do to dogs. We always play it in the shelter, and when the radio's on the noise reduction is drastically noticeable.

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    Re: How long will it take to settle? What should I not do too early?

    Assume that River will whine for about three nights.... so last night or tonight, she should have slept through the night, quietly. Once you are sure she is no longer crying from fear or loneliness, then you can try to eliminate other whining:

    1. Pay attention to when she whines and why. If she whines to go poop or pee, obviously you want to understand that sound.
    2. She may whine when tired before bed at night, then go to sleep. To reduce that whining, take her outside for potty and for 10 min. of playtime. Unlike children, puppies may need to burn off that last bit of energy before they go to bed at night.
    3. She may whine because she wants a little company. A dog may whine when bored, then go to sleep. But, a puppy needs a little more interaction. If you notice a pattern, try to anticipate it and give the puppy a little attention before she whines. Once she whines, wait until she stops for 30 seconds, if possible.
    4. Dogs whine when they feel cooped up and under-exercised. After she has all of her shots, you can walk her 30 min. in the morning and 30 min. in the evening to help reduce this type of whining. As a puppy, 10 - 15 minutes of play before she starts to whine will help.
    5. At least two sessions of training a day will help also.

    Puppies have lots of energy to burn, and they can whine when they don't have a chance to burn it off each day.

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    Re: How long will it take to settle? What should I not do too early?

    Quote Originally Posted by hanksimon View Post
    Assume that River will whine for about three nights.... so last night or tonight, she should have slept through the night, quietly. Once you are sure she is no longer crying from fear or loneliness, then you can try to eliminate other whining:

    1. Pay attention to when she whines and why. If she whines to go poop or pee, obviously you want to understand that sound.
    2. She may whine when tired before bed at night, then go to sleep. To reduce that whining, take her outside for potty and for 10 min. of playtime. Unlike children, puppies may need to burn off that last bit of energy before they go to bed at night.
    3. She may whine because she wants a little company. A dog may whine when bored, then go to sleep. But, a puppy needs a little more interaction. If you notice a pattern, try to anticipate it and give the puppy a little attention before she whines. Once she whines, wait until she stops for 30 seconds, if possible.
    4. Dogs whine when they feel cooped up and under-exercised. After she has all of her shots, you can walk her 30 min. in the morning and 30 min. in the evening to help reduce this type of whining. As a puppy, 10 - 15 minutes of play before she starts to whine will help.
    5. At least two sessions of training a day will help also.

    Puppies have lots of energy to burn, and they can whine when they don't have a chance to burn it off each day.
    Thank you very much! This helps a lot.

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