Leash difficulty
DogForums.com is the premier dog Forum on the internet. Registered Users do not see the above ads.
+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 11 of 11

Thread: Leash difficulty

  1. #1
    Junior Member Connieb3's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Posts
    4

    Leash difficulty

    Hello, we have a 9 week old yellow lab that we brought home on Saturday. We're using a combination of crate and umbilical chord training for potty training. The main problem we're running into is that often when he doesn't want to go outside (even when I know he has to potty) he'll just lay down and refuse to move, even with a slight tug in his leash, excited calling, clapping, kissy noises, etc. He will also do this when hooked to the leash on my waist and I'm walking around trying to clean or whatnot. Right now I just pick him up and carry him outside when he needs to go, since we have deck stairs I have to carry him down anyway, but obviously that's not a viable long term solution. Lol. Also, we'll eventually need him to walk well on a leash for walks and hiking, not just when he feels like it. Any suggestions or ideas? I hate feeling like I have to pick him up our drag him around.

    We do have a fenced yard, but are trying to get him to go in a certain spot in the yard, so we're currently walking him there on the leash. (I won't comment on how the potting in the potty spot is going. That's a whole nother post. Haha.) But again, he does this in house too, so I'm not sure what to do about it.

    Thanks!

  2. Remove Advertisements
    DogForums.com
    Advertisements

  3. #2
    Junior Member 3kpets's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
    Posts
    16

    Re: Leash difficulty

    Have you tried enticing him with a treat? Treats and snacks go a long way hahaha

  4. #3
    Member Sprocket2016's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Posts
    74

    Re: Leash difficulty

    I agree with using a treat that is how I trained sprocket loose leash walking holding a yummy treat in front of his nose and walking a step or two giving him the treat then trying for 3 steps and giving him a treat and so on now at close to 8 months he walks really well on a leash
    At first he did have issues going through the front door we worked on going back and forth thru the door many times throwing treats on the opposite side of where we were now he's a pro also had issues the first week I had him with the 3 stairs leading up to the door did the same thing with the treat tossing he flies down those stairs now lol
    If commercial treats are not doing it try a small piece of chicken or cheese


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  5. Remove Advertisements
    DogForums.com
    Advertisements

  6. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Posts
    40

    Re: Leash difficulty

    Honestly for me, there's too much being involved already in housebreaking a puppy without having to worry about leash training at the same time... I'd buy/borrow baby gates and just gate the puppy in the room with you. Otherwise yeah... treats is how I taught mine to walk on a leash.

    We have deck stairs too and she wouldn't go down the stairs for the first couple days... so I just picked her up and put her in the yard. After that, I would just encourage her and call her from below and eventually she figured it out (I also enticed with treats down the stairs too... but there's only 2 steps). To be fair she's 21 lbs now and I still have to carry her and put her down when it rains (sigh).

  7. #5
    Member Sprocket2016's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Posts
    74

    Re: Leash difficulty

    Before I got my puppy I knew it would be hard work the first few months
    Potty Training as well as sit, lay, come ,loose leash walking, stay, wait, place, leave it, find it, touch, and lots of tricks too are a part of raising a puppy
    Teaching housebreaking is such a small part of raising a healthy well adjusted puppy I don't think that should be too hard to do with all the other above mentioned training as well as many others I'm sure I forgot to mention just my opinion


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  8. #6
    Junior Member Connieb3's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Posts
    4
    We haven't tried treats for the leash stuff yet. He's very food driven so that might work, I just don't want to end up with an overweight lab as an adult due to excessive treating, lol. I want him to be healthy and keep his joints, etc in good shape. We currently use 1/2 his kibble at every meal for training. Started with sit and down, yesterday I added place. We do keep a palmful of kibble out for the inevitable grabs at stuff he shouldn't have to work on "drop", so I suppose we could keep more out for going out the door.

    He definitely hates those stairs, even being carried. We have a walk out basement, so it's a full flight of 20ish deck stairs. He has started going up some of them, so hopefully going down will happen soon and that fear will go away.

    We will have to work on walking the backyard or in the house on leash and him not just plopping down and refusing to move when he doesn't want to. Most puppies I had growing up wanted to be everywhere with you, so it wasn't an issue.

  9. #7
    Senior Member Alisa♥'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Location
    Wauwatosa, WI
    Posts
    126

    Re: Leash difficulty

    I have heard that there's a theory, with labs, to avoid doing too many stairs or jumping up and down from taller places for the first few months (I've even seen up to a year suggested) to protect their hips while they are still growing. So I would totally support the method of walking on the leash to the stairs, picking him up to go down/up, then walking on the leash again to the destination!

  10. #8
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Posts
    55

    Re: Leash difficulty

    Connieb

    Labradors are known to be incredibly food-driven. I've had one for 12 years and as long as the price (read treat) was right Hunter would do anything I asked. What I would suggest is trying to find out which treat he values most and reserve small quantities of those for leash-training or eventually training him to walk up and down the stairs.

    An easy way to find out what kind of food motivates him most is to give him an option of several different treats on several occasions (after good behavior, of course) and see which one he consistently eats first. Labradors are a lot like kids in that they'll rather eat the yummy stuff first and then if they absolutely have to they eat the healthy stuff.

    Obesity is unfortunately an issue with Labradors so you have to keep the treats small and therefor highly valued by the pup. In training Hunter I used 2 treats per session maximum so he realized that he had to work to earn it.

    Another option, of course, is positive reinforcement but I'm sure there's enough other threads about that topic.

  11. #9
    Senior Member Kathyy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    5,678

    Re: Leash difficulty

    You can substitute good quality treats for up to 25% of the CALORIES pup takes in daily without jeopardizing the nutrient balance of the diet. Use hot dogs, cooked chicken, cheese, tuna or liver brownies* up to that amount. I'd not be using only hot dogs or cheese but tuna or liver brownies and cooked plain meat are fine used extensively.

    *5 ounces [1 small can] tuna, other fish or liver. Peanut butter probably works fine but I'm allergic. Mix with an egg in a blender/food processer and small amount of fresh or powdered garlic to cut the smell some. Add as much of your choice of flour as it takes to make a stiff dough. Spread on very well greased or parchment paper lined pan and bake until cooked through at about 350*F. Cut and bake until crisp if you like. I prefer it to be doughy so I can pinch off tiny bits in training. Keep frozen or refrigerated to store so there's no chance your hard work will go to waste.

    Puppy will turn into a land shark when this sort of high value treat is used so add doggy zen to your long list of training sessions. Make a fist around the treat and only open hand when pup stops trying to gnaw it out of your fist. Some people use leather gloves at first so they don't lose any skin, I've never needed them. Extend the wait time as pup gets the lesson until you can do ridiculously elaborate stuff like put treats on paws and pup waits for the release.

  12. #10
    Junior Member Connieb3's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Posts
    4
    Thanks so much for the info! I will look into replacing a bit of his food with some high value treats.

  13. #11
    Senior Member hanksimon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Charleston, SC USA
    Posts
    8,948

    Re: Leash difficulty

    He just came home, so things are a little new. Carrying him downstairs for a week or two won't hurt things, plus at 9 weeks, he may still sleep a lot ... things change weekly, and at 12 weeks you may wish he had an off-button ;-)

    Kibble for training treats is an excellent idea. When I want special treats for my 75Lb Labs, beyond kibble, I'll cut the treat into dime-sized slices, then cut those into fourths, so that I don't offer a little meal, but just a small taste to mark good behavior.

    You can use all of his kibble for training sessions, according to Ian Dunbar. Working for his food with positive, gentle training can help to build the relationship.

    Start teaching him Bite Inhibition, now. ... His nipping is going to get worse. :-)

  14. Remove Advertisements
    DogForums.com
    Advertisements

+ Reply to Thread

Quick Reply Quick Reply

  • Decrease Size
    Increase Size
  • Remove Text Formatting
  • Insert LinkInsert ImageInsert Video
  • Wrap [QUOTE] tags around selected text


Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
SEO by vBSEO 3.5.2 ©2010, Crawlability, Inc.