When is a good time to spay your dog?
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Thread: When is a good time to spay your dog?

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    Senior Member jbray01's Avatar
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    When is a good time to spay your dog?

    I have heard a lot of thoughts on this, one saying that at six months, the puppy should be spayed, but someone else said she should go into her first heat.

    does anyone know the benefits/risks of either? and what is better for the dog?

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    Senior Member Durbkat's Avatar
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    Re: When is a good time to spay your dog?

    It depends on the breed of dog. Most vets push 6 to 7 months because some people can't be responsible with their female dog when it goes into heat and the same applies to people with male dogs when it tries to find a female in heat. But alot of people say its best to wait till after they go through a heat cycle, while others say that it doesn't matter.


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    Senior Member alphadoginthehouse's Avatar
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    Re: When is a good time to spay your dog?

    Quote Originally Posted by Durbkat View Post
    It depends on the breed of dog. Most vets push 6 to 7 months because some people can't be responsible with their female dog when it goes into heat and the same applies to people with male dogs when it tries to find a female in heat. But alot of people say its best to wait till after they go through a heat cycle, while others say that it doesn't matter.

    My vet says 5-6 months (which is when a female will begin her first heat cycle), and it's not because "some people cant be responsible with their female when it goes into heat." I personally don't want to go through the hassle when it really isn't necessary for her to go into heat. Also, my dogs are indoor/outdoor and I don't want to run the risk of an accidental coupling because males can be quite creative on how they get into a yard.

    If you trust your vet, go with his/her recommendation.

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    Re: When is a good time to spay your dog?

    there is a great deal of discussion about the topic in the archives and it might be worth a search of the archives.

    There are many health reasons to wait until after the first heat cycle..... while mammary tumours do increase if you wait until after the dog comes into heat, the risk of other cancers decreases along with endocrine disorders, incontinence and others. However, a girl coming into season is a big huge giant pain in the neck and most people find that they can't deal with the mess and the responsibility of not allowing your girl off leash or out of sight for a month from the beginning to the end.....

    If you want to spay prior to the first heat cycle I would suggest waiting as long as you possibly can.....

    again a search of the archives will turn up more information than I have had time to type today.... and check the health forum where most discussion happens.
    s

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    Senior Member blackrose's Avatar
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    Re: When is a good time to spay your dog?

    I have a question regarding that.

    Is it true that dogs who are allowed to mature sexually before getting altered tend to have more of a sturdy frame? I've heard that mentioned before somewhere, but didn't know if it was true.

    the risk of other cancers decreases along with endocrine disorders, incontinence and others.
    My old girl Rose has an incontinence problem (she was an early spay girl). She'll be laying in our garage taking a nap and when she gets up there will be a puddle of pee laying underneath her. She's not an inside dog so it isn't that big of a deal (as it isn't irritating her skin), but I can't imagine if she was. She'd have to wear doggy diapers.

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    Re: When is a good time to spay your dog?

    Quote Originally Posted by blackrose View Post
    I have a question regarding that.

    Is it true that dogs who are allowed to mature sexually before getting altered tend to have more of a sturdy frame? I've heard that mentioned before somewhere, but didn't know if it was true.

    depending on the breed spaying or neutering prior to maturity tends to cause the growth plates to close later and thus a taller leggier dog.... this taller leggierness (not a word I know) tends to lead to a base narrow stance and leads to more orthopedic injuries like ACL tears and stuff like that.... the frame itself is not necessarily sturdier but the dog is more in proportion....

    hope that makes sense .
    s

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    Senior Member Poly's Avatar
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    Re: When is a good time to spay your dog?

    Quote Originally Posted by blackrose View Post
    I have a question regarding that.

    Is it true that dogs who are allowed to mature sexually before getting altered tend to have more of a sturdy frame? I've heard that mentioned before somewhere, but didn't know if it was true.
    It is very much breed dependent and even individual dependent exactly how a puppy's growth and future health responds to altering at a particular age.

    There is some evidence that with some breeds, the generally accepted spaying and neutering age (6 months old) does have an impact on bone and joint development and this can show up later in various ways.

    However, in the case of spaying, there are significant health reasons to spay at about six months, specifically a demonstrably reduced incidence of mammary cancer and pyometra over the entire lifetime. Considering the fairly high mortality rate in females from these diseases, it is is certainly a tradeoff worth considering if you do not intend to use your female as a breeder anyway.

    With male dogs, the health tradeoffs of neutering at six months or at a later age are rather more complex. If you know the pedigree and don't intend to use your male as a stud, this is something that should be discussed with your vet and with your breeder who should be most familiar with the particular line your dog is from. It should be possible to achieve a consensus about when this is best done for your particular pet.

    With rescued dogs of uncertain parentage and mixed breeds in general, there is no real objective basis to make the tradeoffs so the traditional altering age is probably the best you can do.

    Remember that if you choose to let your dog reach maturity without alterning - male or female - you have incurred a serious obligation to prevent unwanted pregnancies. You should consider the amount of confinement and watchfulness that this may entail for both sexes and plan accordingly.

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