pees on pad, poops on floor
DogForums.com is the premier dog Forum on the internet. Registered Users do not see the above ads.
+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: pees on pad, poops on floor

  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    207

    pees on pad, poops on floor

    Please, someone help me!!

    My baby beagle pees on a pee pad like 99% of the time, I always give him a little piece of the treat & praise and it seems to work perfectly, but I CANNOT get him to poop on the pad, or outside. he will poop ANYWHERE else on the floor, so I mopped with bleach and 'natures miracle stain & odor remover' but he still does it.
    I tried saying "NO!" in a stern voice when hes about to do it, then I put him on the pad, but he doesn't go. Instead he will go under the couch and poop when I'm not looking.. What has worked for you all? any advice is greatly appreciated..


    heres my boy!

  2. Remove Advertisements
    DogForums.com
    Advertisements
     

  3. #2
    Super Moderator Kuma'sMom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Manitoba, Canada
    Posts
    5,200

    Re: pees on pad, poops on floor

    I've heard a lot of people say that you need to spread out several potty pads instead of just one. This worked for me when we were using them, since my Pug hates pooping where he has peed and vice versa. We've since weaned him off the potty pads, but I'd give that a try.

  4. #3
    Senior Member FilleBelle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    The home of swimming pools and movie stars
    Posts
    4,574

    Re: pees on pad, poops on floor

    Any particular reason you're using the pads if you also have an outdoor area for your pup to use (which it sounded like you did, from my reading)?


    RIP Clifford, who never met a stranger

  5. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    396

    Re: pees on pad, poops on floor

    I know people on this forum have suggested pee pads, and they say they have been successful with them.

    Each dog is an individual, especially in the potty department. Some dogs "get it" in a very short time (I recently trained a 4 month old pup in 3 days) others take longer (4 month old pup I rescued last year took every bit of 5-6 months, long story).

    Dogs need to be walked to get things moving, correct potty training is essential to other training, plus they need the exercise. Using pee pads is a completely un-natural thing for dogs. Using them is fighting the natural thing dogs need most.

    Lots of people have found themselves backing up and starting all over in the potty department when they have been unsuccessful with pee pads.

    I have a simple 5 step program that has been successful for me a lots of others. If you would like me to post it, please let me know.

    Anela

  6. #5
    Senior Member skunkstripe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    up in the frozen north
    Posts
    373

    Re: pees on pad, poops on floor

    Well whatever you do, don't say "no" sternly when you catch him about to start. You may think that he will get the message that you do not want him to go on the floor, but instead the mesages that gets to his doggy brain is that he better not let you see him pooping at all. The result is he gets sneaky about it and goes when and where you are not looking so he won't get yelled at.
    Get in touch with your inner canine!

  7. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    207

    Re: pees on pad, poops on floor

    see this is why I love you guys, so many responses in so little time, I cant wait to do the same :-)


    Kumasmom- we have 3 pads, in random spots in the room, he uses all 3 to pee on..

    filliebelle- we take him out about every 20-30 min, he rather play then poop... occasional pee, and yes, we keep him on a leash while hes out there (most of the time)

    anela- PLEASE post it. I know I can learn from it, and I'm sure someone else can too..

    skunkstripe- I shall try that, thank you.

  8. #7
    Senior Member Durbkat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    KY
    Posts
    7,508

    Re: pees on pad, poops on floor

    If there is not a reason as to why you can't house train the dog then I would suggest that you take the dog outside to go to the bathroom as anela said, its against their natural instinct. I did the pads as well but my dog wouldn't really used them so I got these drop clothes that painters use to cover the floor while they are painting to keep the paint off the floor and it is made of the same stuff as puppy pads are. So I covered the sectioned off area my puppy was in. Then eventually he started going on one area of the room so I cut the pad down to that area. But I wouldn't recommend it as its costly and it would have been alot easier to just house train him. But we live in an apartment and we couldn't crate him as the neighbors complained. That was my reason for the pads, but if we had a house my dog would have been house trained from the beginning, we don't use pads anymore though.


  9. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    396

    Re: pees on pad, poops on floor

    Here is the cut and paste thing. Please forgive what my not apply to you, and the length. I put this system together after I spent every bit of 5-6 months house traing my pup last year. This is an unusually long time to make this happen (long story), but I did learn lots, mostly thanks to my vet, and it did the trick for me. I have also given the info. to lots of other people and they have all indicated that it has helped solve the potty problem. Good luck!

    *Potty training. Don’t expect a “quick fix”. To be successful with this and other training issues, you really need to crate train. Potty training correctly, is a very important issue for you and your dog. Lots of people get frustrated when their dog does not make progress. Commitment, work, consistency, treats and praise and are key to this issue. Potty training problems are one of the major reasons so many dogs wind up at the pound or back at one. Below I have listed 5 key steps to get your dog potty trained. It a simple procedure that has worked for me and lots of others. But first, some words about crate training.

    Numerous people have a negative attitude about crate training. They think that the dog will be uncomfortable when crated, or they don’t like the idea because of what they have read, heard, or just think. If you have a negative attitude, you need to make it a positive.

    Crate training a newly introduced pup or even an older dog is one of the most important things you will ever do for you and your new dog. Pups and older dogs love the feeling of being closed in when they are in a strange place, especially if there is an old sheet over the crate, leaving the front open so dog can look out. If the crate has to much room for a pup to move around, put something indestructible inside to cut down on space so pup can curl up and feel secure. Leaving soft music playing when you are away pacifies the dog and helps prevent separation anxiety. Dogs of any age kept confined to the crate won’t get into trouble when you are away or can’t supervise. The more room new dogs have to roam around in like a blocked off kitchen or bathroom, the more trouble they can get in to.

    If you have a pup, the crate should be in your bedroom at night and in a living area during the day to help the bonding process. It is not realistic to expect a pup, used to being around litter mates and mother to like being left alone, especially at night. They get frightened and confused and make all kinds of noise.

    If whining is an issue, with the sheet over the crate, gently tap on the top and firmly say “stop”. This may need to be repeated a few times, but soon dog will associate your command with the crate tapping. When whining stops, give praise and treats.

    Newly introduced dogs must earn your trust and their unsupervised freedom from the crate. Lots of people try to do this to quickly. This confuses the dog with to much space to roam around in. To be successful with your dog, initially you simply must supervise every second when dog is out of the crate. Dog should have a leash on when out so you can easily grab it and take the dog out when you need to or to keep it out of trouble. Frozen Kongs stuffed with cheese or peanut butter or other toys that don’t splinter should also be available for dog to chew on. Never leave dog alone with a chew toy, it could get lodged in the mouth or throat. Keep in mind that dog is looking at you and an alpha dog figure for guidance, not a human. It is your duty to provide this.

    When dog is house trained and you can start to trust the way things are going, weaning dog from the crate can start. This also must be done gradually so dog won’t get confused. About 10 minute intervals without a leash over the course of about one month or more is essential, depending on how well dog is doing. When dog is good give tons of praise and perhaps a treat. While dog is out of the crate, give lots of praise for anything good done, like drinking water, laying around, chewing on a toy, etc. Anything dog does that is positive should get recognition, this builds confidence and lets dog know that it is able to please you.

    To get dog used to your absence, leave the house with dog outside of the crate for only a few minutes. Leave the crate door open, return inside and give tons of praise and treats if dog has been good. If dog has gotten into only minor mischief, state your displeasure by firmly stating that dog was bad. Dogs are very visual creatures, only minor scolding and the look of your face should get the point across. Gradually increase time when dog is alone over the course of a month or so depending on how well things go.


    **When house training a dog it is very important for you to pick a system and stick with that, rather than switch if things are not going well. Switching will only confuse you and your pup. If you are not having success, you need to back up and start over, only go slower. House training is the first major step dog is going to take in earning your trust, this is simply a must for any indoor dog. If you have an older dog that needs to potty trained, you need to treat dog like a pup.

    Here is a simple step by step method for potty training that worked for me. It also has worked for others.

    1. First you need to realize that not all dogs are the same in this category. Some get it within a week or less, others take longer etc. How you might ask do I know so much about potty training?? I rescued a 4 month old Shepard/Hound last year, my fourth dog in 16 years. (I have two others that were a snap to train). She took about 5 months to potty train. This is an unusually long time, I had to back up numerous times and start over. I dug into her past and found out that she was traumatized by her experience before I came along. She completely missed the prime time of her life to be potty trained. I was really forced to take small baby steps forward after very minimal progress.

    MOST dogs won’t go in their crate. If pup does, remove blankets or padding. This should cure that problem. If problems persist, increase time when no padding is on the floor. 2. You need to start potty training by taking dog out immediately after dog comes out of the crate. Then, gradually increase length of time to regular intervals (gradually increased over the course of one-two months depending on how successful dog is doing). Get dog used to the commands “go poo” and “go pee”. These commands should be a must, they are incredibly helpful when the weather is bad.

    If dog doesn't do anything, that's fine, if it does, give tons of praise and give a treat, preferably one used just for training purposes. Consistency is the key to all of this. Dogs are creatures of habit and depend on a schedule. This is no time to skimp on excessive praise and treats when you are house training. Pup needs to associate yummy treats with doing it’s thing. Boiled or baked chicken liver is a great training tool, dogs crave it and you really have their attention when you use it.

    2. Daily walks at least twice a day (about 20-30 minutes each in the same area) are essential for dogs and getting them house trained. Walking gets things moving, dogs love it and it gives them something to look forward to. Try and feed a pup prior to the walks. Never free feed unless your vet says to. Pups have a high metabolism. Soon after it eats or drinks, it will need to go out.

    3. Pups drink huge amounts of water. In theory yours should be able to hold it for (one hour for each month) up to about 9 months. In reality, if a young pup has been playing, it will gulp down lots of water, and just won't be able to hold it for that long. After pup drinks, keep an eye on it. Take it out in about 5-10 minutes and offer it relief. Soon pup will go to the door when it need to go out.

    4. Your pup won't be considered house trained unless it has no accidents for at least 9months! Also, as I learned, there is a HUGE difference in a dog that is 4-6 months old and one that is 9-10 months old. They grow inside and out. Once they reach 9-10 months, their bladders are larger and able to hold it longer.

    5. Piddle pads and newspapers should never be used. Some on this forum have suggested them, and have had success with them. If you start to use them and dog gets accustomed to doing it’s thing on them, you could have a very difficult time getting dog to go on grass or even get dog outside. Some people see these pads and papers as a short cut to potty training. It is not. Dogs really need a natural area to relieve themselves.

    Because dogs are creatures of habit, they will associate the pads and papers with relieving themselves and you may find yourself starting all over in the potty training department, which would make for even more work for all involved. In other words, when was the last time you saw a wolf (dogs closest cousin) use a pee pad?

    Good luck !

    Anela

  10. Remove Advertisements
    DogForums.com
    Advertisements
     

+ Reply to Thread

Quick Reply Quick Reply

  • Decrease Size
    Increase Size
  • Remove Text Formatting
  • Insert Link Insert Image Insert Video
  • Wrap [QUOTE] tags around selected text

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
SEO by vBSEO 3.5.2 ©2010, Crawlability, Inc.