Why would rescues require a fenced yard?
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Thread: Why would rescues require a fenced yard?

  1. #41
    Senior Member InkedMarie's Avatar
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    Re: Why would rescues require a fenced yard?

    Quote Originally Posted by Bordermom View Post
    I think it's a dumb rule myself. I mean most fenced yards have GATES. Gates can get left open! Fences don't always contain dogs, if they're on ignore and can dig, or jump, or whatever. It's a silly requirement. I'd rather see some sort of 'no chaining' rule and manditory training classes for all adopted dogs, that would be more of a benifit than making sure the yard is fenced.


    Lana
    I agree about it being a dumb rule, mostly. IMO, it would depend on the dog. Some dogs might need a fenced in yard and to require it for that dog, then a good rule. Yes, fences can have gates....thats why you lock them. We have two gates on our fence; both are padlocked. In regards to a dog digging out, this is when the owner comes into play....for alot of dogs, you can't just put them in the yard and leave them go, you need to check on them. Mine are out alone, one of mine digs but not at the fence but we have a hundred holes in the back yard because of her LOL. I put them out but still check often.

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  3. #42
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    Re: Why would rescues require a fenced yard?

    Paul and I already knew what rescue we were going to when we adopted Dexter because our neighbor is good friends with the woman who started it. They skipped over the home visit and everything once Janette called Mitzi and she said we were good and spoiled our cats rotten. She had also talked about us to her before over our FeLV+ cats, both our 2 inside ones and multiple outdoor(feral) ones. They didn't care that we didn't have a fenced in yard. Actually Mitzi let's us use hers she she's not home if we want to. Dexter gets walked everytime he has to go potty and he might spend 30 mins in Mitzi's backyard or a couple hours at the dog park depending on the weather. They want what is best for their animals, Janette let us have a cat for free after Nuts died(we donated money to them anyways in leui of an adoption fee)because she knew how much I had put into taking of Attitude and Nuts and that we were crushed to lose Nuts to FeLV and it was a total shock. He was perfectly 'healthy' until the day we had him PTS'd when we found out the virus had infected his bone marrow and he was in total marrow failure. They like for all adopters to have fenced in yards but they do it on a case by case basis. Like I said Dex gets walked multiple times a day and him and the cat love to play and Dexter loves to chase Sirius, the cat, around the house(the cat likes it he encourages the dog to chase him) and depending on the weather he might play in Mitzi's backyard or the dog park so he does get exercise. He's a JRT/collie or corgi mix so he would drive us insane if he didn't get enough exercise.
    I will say that your letter to the rescue was really out of line and very rude. I don't think I would have even bothered to respond once much less multiple times like they did. There was no reason what so ever for you to be rude to them over a rule they have. If you don't agree with them then simply don't adopt from them, plain and simple.

    Taryn

    Dexter and Sirius

  4. #43
    Super Moderator cshellenberger's Avatar
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    Re: Why would rescues require a fenced yard?

    Quote Originally Posted by KBLover View Post
    I don't get the children thing - that's another training and supervision thing. Just because a dog doesn't like kids NOW doesn't mean he can't ever like kids. Just counter-condition and go for it.
    Therea re many reasons for not allowing small children, small children aren't the nicest people to small dogs (I was a horror to small dogs at 3-4 years old and mym moms cat once scratched me and I threw it in the dryer and turned it on...) also there are dogs out there like my Angel who are scared of small children, she would most likely NEVER be reliable around them. Then there are large and giant breeds whose tail could injure a child (seriously getting hit by a Mastiff tail is like getting hit by a bat) and then there are resource gaurders, which should NEVER be adopted to families with children.
    Carla
    "A fool gives full vent to his anger, but a wise man keeps himself under control" Proverbs 29:11

  5. #44
    Senior Member +two's Avatar
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    Re: Why would rescues require a fenced yard?

    For the most part, it has been my experience that the restrictions put on adopting families are in place for good reason. I have had to explain to people why a certain dog wouldn't be a good fit in their home, and even if they disagree, it is in the best interest of the dog.

    Children are one of those restrictions that I think are put in place for very good reason. Simply put, many of my fosters have too much energy and are too exuberant to be placed in a home with small children. Resource guarding, as cschellenberger mentioned, is another disqualifying trait. Resource guarding can be managed very well to the point where it is no longer an issue with the owners, but with a small child the risk is too great for injury.

    Rescue's don't need any bad publicity and placing 'iffy' dogs in homes that aren't suitable is asking for trouble.

  6. #45
    Senior Member osdbmom's Avatar
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    Re: Why would rescues require a fenced yard?

    I think it is a strange rule, myself. I think it would be better to have the question on the adoption form or during an interview, "Do you have a fenced yard? If not, how do you plan to exercise this dog?" and then maybe check after a month or so and see if the dog is being left tied out or something. I ran into some strange rules when we were looking, "must have fence", "must not have kids under 12" (ok, I can see toddlers being a problem, but an 11 yr old? really?) and that could also be worked out if the family brought their children to the rescue and the rescue could watch them interact with dogs. Or maybe there could be community classes to teach families with kids how to be responsible with dogs. The oddest thing I think I found was a rescue who wont adopt a dog out unless you promise to feed raw.
    I have 1 acre of property. I do not have a fence. So...I walk my dogs. A lot. Or we put them on leash and run around the yard with them. Sometimes, we put them on a stake and cord if we are outside for awhile, such as doing yard work.
    I have a friend who decided with her family to get a shelter dog. While there, they found a beautiful, older dog with a sign on its cage that said, "Today is my last day". My friends heart just broke, as she is an animal lover. She told the staff she wanted him. They asked if she had a fence. She doesnt, so she was not allowed to adopt the dog, and it ended up being put down. Thats a really sad situation.
    I know the rescues have the best interests of the animal at heart, and making sure they are cared for well should be the goal of everyone involved. It just seems to me that if things were taken more on a case by case basis, instead of just a blanket rule, more dogs could find good homes.
    However....when I was looking for a yorkie, bc some of the ones that looked like a good fit for our family, we just couldnt mesh with the rules. I lucked out and found my yorkie on craigslist.

  7. #46
    Senior Member WheatenDaneMom's Avatar
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    Re: Why would rescues require a fenced yard?

    I have dealt with some rescues that just made insane requests... I find that shelters are more lenient.
    Please scale down your signature

  8. #47
    Senior Member ThoseWordsAtBest's Avatar
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    Re: Why would rescues require a fenced yard?

    Quote Originally Posted by JackRider View Post
    Good thing I use anonymous email accounts and different names
    Definitely not insane at all. LAWD.

  9. #48
    Senior Member jersey_gray's Avatar
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    Re: Why would rescues require a fenced yard?

    I can't imagine having a dog without having a fenced yard unless your talking a Chihuahua. But my dogs do their business in the fenced backyard, I just open the door and tell them to "go potty". As to exercise they happily chase the ball in the house. The big dog will play outside but the small dog won't chase anything outside-has to be balls and in the house. I would want a fenced yard to have dogs. I do let my dogs in the yard unsupervised. Their not diggers/jumpers/climbers, it's a six foot tall solid wood fence and there's nothing behind us. At our old house the yard was fenced but due to the neighborhood and not as secure fencing the dogs needed supervision there.
    Last edited by jersey_gray; 12-14-2011 at 12:01 AM.

  10. #49
    Senior Member ThoseWordsAtBest's Avatar
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    Re: Why would rescues require a fenced yard?

    Quote Originally Posted by jersey_gray View Post
    I can't imagine having a dog without having a fenced yard unless your talking a Chihuahua. But my dogs do their business in the fenced backyard, I just open the door and tell them to "go potty". As to exercise they happily chase the ball in the house. The big dog will play outside but the small dog won't chase anything outside-has to be balls and in the house. I would want a fenced yard to have dogs. I do let my dogs in the yard unsupervised. Their not diggers/jumpers/climbers, it's a six foot tall solid wood fence and there's nothing behind us. At our old house the yard was fenced but due to the neighborhood and not as secure fencing the dogs needed supervision there.
    I have a Dachshund who can easily dig himself out of a fenced in yard. Ain't about size. We had a ~20 lbs terrier mix at work that scaled up a kennel door and leaped out the top, kennel is probably at least 8 feet high but I am terrible with scale. I lived in an apartment with my mutt, Norwegian Elkhound, and briefly my Dachshund. A fenced in yard is easy for going the bathroom, but we get our exercise else where. I do not need a fence to own a dog.

  11. #50
    Super Moderator cshellenberger's Avatar
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    Arrow Re: Why would rescues require a fenced yard?

    Quote Originally Posted by jersey_gray View Post
    I can't imagine having a dog without having a fenced yard unless your talking a Chihuahua. But my dogs do their business in the fenced backyard, I just open the door and tell them to "go potty". As to exercise they happily chase the ball in the house. The big dog will play outside but the small dog won't chase anything outside-has to be balls and in the house. I would want a fenced yard to have dogs. I do let my dogs in the yard unsupervised. Their not diggers/jumpers/climbers, it's a six foot tall solid wood fence and there's nothing behind us. At our old house the yard was fenced but due to the neighborhood and not as secure fencing the dogs needed supervision there.
    I'm currently living without a fences yard with a Doberman. We walk her and take her to an unused ball field to get her excercise. It can be done and have a happy healthy dog of any breed
    Carla
    "A fool gives full vent to his anger, but a wise man keeps himself under control" Proverbs 29:11

  12. #51
    Senior Member Kyllobernese's Avatar
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    Re: Why would rescues require a fenced yard?

    I think the main reason they want a fenced yard is they know too many people don't walk their dogs, just open the door and let them out. I am not saying I agree as too many people think that if they have a fenced in yard, that is enough exercise for the dog. I think it should completely depend on the person's situation when they are getting a dog. Many dogs that do not have a fenced in yard get more attention than they would if the owner could just turn them loose in a yard.

  13. #52
    Senior Member zdonBGSU's Avatar
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    Re: Why would rescues require a fenced yard?

    I think the fence is for lazy people to let their dogs off leash without fence or rock solid recall.

    but with that said, a person that I don't think can handle a dog or knows how to care for one, will fail with or without a fenced yard. Sure, a fenced yard MAY save the dog from running off, but it may also give the bad owner an excuse not to exercise the dog properly.

    at the same time, a good owner will do great with or without a yard. sure, I would love to have a yard to train my dog off leash, even without a yard, I think I spend more time than most owners with a yard.

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