Bleach does NOT kill Parvo!
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Thread: Bleach does NOT kill Parvo!

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    Senior Member ACampbell's Avatar
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    Bleach does NOT kill Parvo!

    I contacted a company called Spray Nine in regards to a product I use in my home frequently (it kills many nasty things like MRSA and is approved for hospital use) in regards to it's effectiveness on Parvo.
    Here is the reply I received:


    Ashley,

    We have not tested Spray Nine for Parvo – we focus on viruses and bacteria that pose health risks to humans –

    FYI, bleach does NOT kill Parvo, either
    With regards to Parvo, there are disinfectants that have the Parvo claim (some are like 10-20 minutes)-I would suggest you contact a few businesses in the industry of servicing veterinary businesses – they may recommend one – probably several would be surprised to hear that bleach doesn’t kill it.



    I thought this would be some good information to pass along to anyone who has had Parvo in their home, or has had any kind of exposure to it...

    Here's some more information on picking a product to actually kill Parvo.
    http://www.animalsheltering.org/reso...laim_game.html
    Last edited by ACampbell; 07-14-2008 at 10:43 AM.
    If at first you don't succeed, destroy all evidence that you ever tried.

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  3. #2
    Senior Member briteday's Avatar
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    Re: Bleach does NOT kill Parvo!

    Did you read the article you posted? It clearly states that bleach does kill parvo, but not on difficult, mostly porous, surfaces. So they suggested that shelters be built with surfaces that are easily disinfected.
    Having worked in medical labs for years, bleach (at different dilutions for different viral exposure) is the mainstay of disinfection at the end of every shift or work session. I personally have worked on a daily basis with known positive HIV specimens and we use bleach to clean that work bench as HIV is a virulent virus much like parvo.
    Not only is bleach inexpensive ($1/gal) but it can be diluted to vaious ratios based on the level of disinfection needed. As stated in the article you posted, the downside is that it can irritate the lungs, skin, etc of humans using it and animals living in a recently disinfected area. Those downsides can be eliminated by wearing protective gloves, aprons, eye protection as well as letting the newly disinfected area air out for a while before exposing animals to the environment.

    Here are quotes taken directly from the article you posted:

    "A study led by one of Potgieter’s graduate students and published last year in JAAHA compared several different disinfectants and found again that the quaternary ammonium compound was not effective against feline calicivirus or feline panleukopenia, a kind of parvovirus (“Virucidal Efficacy of Four New Disinfectants,” May/June 2002,Vol. 38). Sodium hypochlorite, or bleach, served as a control and killed all the viruses tested, including calicivirus, panleukopenia, and feline herpesvirus."

    "The bright side of bleach, of course, is that it irritates the microorganisms far more than it irritates the macro ones, killing even the most resistant viruses (see “The Bleach Niche”). But the corrosive, staining, and irritating qualities of sodium hypochlorite have had many people searching for years for an alternative."
    Being smart is learning from your own mistakes. Being wise is learning from others' mistakes.
    Cally- 14 yo papillon, Moose the puppy, McKenna 8 yo pomeranian grand-dog, and chickens

  4. #3
    Senior Member sillylilykitty's Avatar
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    Re: Bleach does NOT kill Parvo!

    I think bleach does kill Parvo. Otherwise the top Vets would be saying it doesnt kill it.
    Lily- 7 1/2 year old Siamese cat
    Luna- 4 year old Catahoula Leopard Dog mix


  5. #4
    Senior Member ACampbell's Avatar
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    Re: Bleach does NOT kill Parvo!

    Clorox is the only bleach that claims it, and I confirmed this with my vet who stated that the storebrand "bleach" is not the same and does not work.
    I should have elaborated, for yard clean up and such it is not suggested.
    Also, read the Clorox website, you have to have a 10 minute wait to kill Parvo (meaning "wet time") so it has to be pretty saturated.
    http://www.clorox.com/products/faqs.php?prod_id=clb

    There's several other sites and lots of information on it on what can be used instead of bleach.

    And YES Brite, I did read the article, unfortunately I Copy and Pasted the wrong one. There are other commercial cleaners that are more effective than bleach though, I meant to post the one I did with another remark on it but was distracted this morning, sorry.
    I checked this against a bottle of bleach I have at home, it is not Clorox brand it is made by some large commercial provider. Parvo is not covered, I called the company and asked and they stated that their bleach is not effective against Parvo. That's not exactly a positive thing to say so I imagine I believe the people I talked to this morning.

    So why do people suggest spraying it on your yard if you have had a Parvo infection there? It's a porous surface and it would dilute down, I don't see how much of a gain this could be. Also it would probably evaporate before the 10 minute wet time window was up so how effective is this?

    Here was what my vet suggested in the event of a Parvo outbreak
    http://www.calvetsupply.com/browsepr...---Gallon.HTML
    This was the link I MEANT to post originally. Duh me!

    FTR I don't have a Parvo issue at my house, but a friend does and we are looking at the most effective solution for clean up and disposal. Hence why I contacted the company I have the chemicals from, then my vet, etc...we are trying to contain it and when my vet said not to use bleach that it's "basically worthless" and that there are other things out there and the email I got back this morning really makes me doubt the practical use of bleach on this situation.

    The Spray Nine stuff I use in my house (hospital grade cleaner for MRSA etc etc and a ton of other things) is highly caustic...it's almost amazing at what it can do to some surfaces, but has proven to be safe to use on carpet (I've used it on my own)...whereas bleach is not. I was really curious as to how effective it would be (it has a longer viral kill list than typical bleach does in a shorter time span) - evidently according to their representative it is not effective

    EDIT:

    Reading other than websites for Parvo-sol etc some say it may be less effective than they guarantee...this was found on a kennel cleaning information website.
    Then this stuff was mentioned:

    http://www.momar.com/www/pdf/neutradis.pdf

    Curious to see what the consensus is on this.
    Last edited by ACampbell; 07-14-2008 at 12:41 PM. Reason: Automerged Doublepost
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    Senior Member Spicy1_VV's Avatar
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    Re: Bleach does NOT kill Parvo!

    If diluted correctly, applied and allowed for kill time it does kill parvo. There is no guarantee it will kill all of it or every single little organism. When you use kitchen or bathroom spray cleaners they might not get all of it, especially if you don't apply properly and allow the wait time. It is like you almost didn't do it at all.

    I use Parvo-lan 128 to disinfect but I've used bleach before to clean from parvo. I can't tell you it killed them without having been able to see if their was any virus left or not but I will say it worked to the best of my knowledge. Consider I've never had a dog get parvo again, including the pup I got less then a couple months after the infection.

    We also use Odoban and Nolvasan for cleaning purposes.

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    Senior Member briteday's Avatar
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    Re: Bleach does NOT kill Parvo!

    First, as a biochemist, sodium hypochlorite is sodium hypochlorite, no matter which brand. But I did a small sampling of brands around my own house and found that Clorox only has 5.25% and the generic brands I have around have 6% sodium hypochlorite.

    I will say that at the lab we used generic brands but I always figured it was a cost factor as name brands are more expensive.

    I believe that the difference in concentrations is insignificant relating to this topic.

    However, having had a couple of parvo positive litters fostered in my home, it is critical that people understand the saturation time of 10 minutes needed to do the job with bleach. This means that all surfaces must be able to withstand wet application for 10 minutes or more. And even when wiping after 10 minutes it is important not to wipe the surface completely dry, but leave the surface slightly damp as evaporation (adding oxygen to the solution) causes an oxidative process that will further kill viruses.

    I dilute bleach 50/50 with water when cleaning up after parvo indoors. And since kittens do not go outside I don't have the issue with dirt or outdoor areas to clean. However, if I did have to go down that road I would most likely choose to confine elimination of animals to a small area so that disinfection, in the case of parvo, could be as complete as possible. If it were me I would be buying several gallons of bleach and pouring it straight (no dilution) in the elimination area.
    Being smart is learning from your own mistakes. Being wise is learning from others' mistakes.
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    Senior Member sillylilykitty's Avatar
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    Re: Bleach does NOT kill Parvo!

    Well thats ok, Clorox is the only brand of bleach my family and I use.
    Lily- 7 1/2 year old Siamese cat
    Luna- 4 year old Catahoula Leopard Dog mix


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    Re: Bleach does NOT kill Parvo!

    Bleach will kill anything, if used properly.

    I bought some stuff called Ken-Care, and it says it kills Parvo. I haven't used it for that purpose, though, just for general sanitizing.
    "Compassion for animals is intimately associated with goodness of character, and it may be confidently asserted that he who is cruel to animals cannot be a good man."
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    Senior Member JeanninePC99's Avatar
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    Re: Bleach does NOT kill Parvo!

    Quote Originally Posted by briteday View Post
    First, as a biochemist, sodium hypochlorite is sodium hypochlorite, no matter which brand. But I did a small sampling of brands around my own house and found that Clorox only has 5.25% and the generic brands I have around have 6% sodium hypochlorite.
    Thanks for pointing that out. Bleach is bleach, people. It doesn't matter what brand you use. It's going to work just fine.

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    Re: Bleach does NOT kill Parvo!

    Hello, I had lost my puppy Enzo, who I absolutely fell in love with and adored, to parvo. He was a french bulldog. He was sold to me with the virus. I had bought him in march and within a week of having him I had to put him down. I was devastated! I am about to pick up my new frenchie Lola tomorrow. I am super nervous something like this is going to happen again because the virus was in my home. My vet advised me to bleach everything in really hot water and whatever could not be bleached be thrown away. I basically threw out everything! The crate was power washed and soaked in bleach and I bleached my floors and had the carpets cleaned. I am hoping I have done enough to clean it and the fact it was four months ago will ensure me that there is no sign of the virus in my home. Please if anyone has any feedback I'd love to hear. I am planning on soaking the puppies area with bleach one last time to really clean well. I am so happy to be getting my little girl tomorrow but I wish I still had Enzo. No body plans on loosing a pet so soon and so tragic! I pray I will have Lola for a very long time!!!:-)

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    Re: Bleach does NOT kill Parvo!

    Bleach does kill the parvo virus, and bleach is bleach.

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    Senior Member mashlee08's Avatar
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    Re: Bleach does NOT kill Parvo!

    I don't think clinics would use bleach if it doesn't kill everything.(although the last 3 clinics I have worked in use Trygene) but we always have bleach in the right solutions made up. Saturation time and % is extremely important. You don't want to risk it with nasty things like that. Although where I am from parvo is pretty rare and it is huge news when a puppy has parvo in new zealand, a clinic could have parvo an hour away and the news spreads like wild fire. "Woah so and so's clinic had a case of parvo!" Sometimes it even makes the local paper to warn people.

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    Re: Bleach does NOT kill Parvo!

    If you read about the other compounds that kill parvo, they also share the 10 minute contact time.

    Bleach is a powerful tool in cleaning up after parvo.

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    Senior Member Poly's Avatar
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    Re: Bleach does NOT kill Parvo!

    Household bleach (essentially a 4%-6% solution of sodium hypochlorite in water) is a very effective disinfectant. It works against a wide range of bacteria and viruses, INCLUDING the parvo virus. Don't believe the advertising hype- read the scientific data.

    Household bleach should not be used full strength from the bottle. Generally, a one-in-five (1:6) dilution is used in hospitals and veterinary facilities for dealing with infectious diseases, so I would use that dilution for home indoor disinfection for parvo. For routine general household and other disinfection (not dealing with infectious diseases) a one-in-nine (1:10) dilution is adequate.

    As with any corrosive chemical, there ARE some safety issues that should be taken into account when using bleach (see Safety). The reason why other disinfectants are sometimes used is that they are less corrosive on hard surfaces and - maybe- have fewer health concerns for the user. Not that are any more effective.

    Finally, there is no practical way to remove parvo viruses from soil, sand, grassy areas, or other similar outdoor surfaces. Time and exposure is the only alternative there, and in areas visited continuosly by animals, one should consider them as always infected. That's why it is important to get your puppies vaccinated.

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    Re: Bleach does NOT kill Parvo!

    Why Bleach Does Not Work Well as a Disinfectant

    Here's a typical answer that we often see on the internet to questions consumers have about bleach as a disinfectant.
    No_Bleach_Logo
    Question: "How can I disinfect an area contaminated by a dog infected with Parvovirus?
    Incorrect Answer: "There are many Parvovirus disinfectants on the market, but regular old bleach is still 100% effective against Parvovirus. The dilution for bleach is one part bleach to 30 parts water. Caution is advised for dyed or colored fabrics or objects. This should go without saying, but to be complete, DO NOT use a bleach preparation on the animal at any time!!! "

    The answer is wrong because it relies on undocumented kill claims and a misunderstanding about the nature of bleach.

    For many years bleach, or sodium hypochlorite, has been used as an inexpensive universal disinfectant. Over the last few years the EPA has put pressure on bleach manufacturers, including the large national brands, to discontinue promoting bleach as an antimicrobial unless the product is tested and properly registered for efficacy. The following provides an overview for the distribution and use of bleach.

    Bleach has virtually no surfactant base so, a second solution will be needed to preclean mthe surface. The EPA now requires that any product, including bleach, that makes specific kill claims, be thoroughly tested for efficacy, registered and properly labeled. Unlike quaternary disinfectants and sanitizers, bleach does not have a residual surface presence.

    Commercial bleach can be very unstable in that the active ingredient (sodium hypochlorite) will dissipate over a very short period of time. The manufacturer may use a 10% solution of sodium hypochlorite to water but, by the time the product reaches the consumer, the actual active may reduce to 5%.

    It is well documented that sodium hypochlorite is a known carcinogen. It can also irritate skin and permanently damage eyes.

    Bleach is still used by many animal hospitals and other animal care facilities. In addition to the potential hazards listed above, bleach has a negative impact on an animal' olfactory system (ability to smell). For cats the problem is, if they can’t smell what they eat they won’t eat it. This is especially true with large cats in the zoo environment. For dogs, the problem is more prevalent in working canines(police dogs) where the loss of smell can effect their ability to track suspects, detect drugs and explosives,etc.

    Bleach (sodium hypochlorite) will naturally expand in its container. To prevent the container from exploding (especially gallon containers), the manufacturer will use a vented cap to allow the gas to escape into the air. This gas, in a confined environment like a delivery truck and/or storage closet, does have the capability of permeating surrounding surfaces, such as cardboard, paper bags, etc. thus creating a potential for the contamination of food products. X

    Bleach is known to cause many serious permanent medical conditions (everywhere from basic skin irritation to neurological and seizure conditions) in both humans and animals. There are other non-toxic chemicals on the market today that have been proven in labs to control animal disease that are safer than bleach. I myself could never use bleach as I'm highly allergic to it, because of this I've researched for other safer products. Ask your veterinarian for a list of safer cleaning supplies. Cheaper is not always better in the long run... educate yourselves from legitimate sources, don't just go off what people say on the internet, especially public forums. A post from a forum member with a high post count doesn't make a person correct, even if their hearts are in the right place....
    Last edited by inkypaws; 07-22-2013 at 06:54 AM.

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    Senior Member sassafras's Avatar
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    Re: Bleach does NOT kill Parvo!

    Eh, the sky isn't falling. Bleach isn't generally used as an all-purpose disinfectant in most clinics, only if there's been a known or suspected case of specific problems (such as parvo) and no one would use it in a cage an animal was still occupying. Nor can I imagine anyone using it as a cleaner (cleaning and disinfecting are two different things).

  18. #17
    Senior Member gingerkid's Avatar
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    Re: Bleach does NOT kill Parvo!

    Quote Originally Posted by sassafras View Post
    Eh, the sky isn't falling. Bleach isn't generally used as an all-purpose disinfectant in most clinics, only if there's been a known or suspected case of specific problems (such as parvo) and no one would use it in a cage an animal was still occupying. Nor can I imagine anyone using it as a cleaner (cleaning and disinfecting are two different things).

    My microbiology professor claimed that was all he used in his kitchen and bathroom, in a 1:10 dilution. (But those are both places that would benefit from regular disinfection).

    Re: the claims about bleach being linked to cancer... is there data on other quaternary cleaners and their link to cancer? I have a hard time imagining something that is as effective as bleach doesn't also have similar health/safety risks.

  19. #18
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    Re: Bleach does NOT kill Parvo!

    I use bleach alot to clean the clinic to disinfect and Parvo Clear as a main disinfectant for our clinic. and yes bleach is horrible smelly stuff it burns my skin! and the smell can burn your senses too especially if people spray it right on to pee. ( ammonia + bleach = poison.


    I use bleach to clean all our towels and fabrics.

    parvo clear is 90$ a gallon. you dilute it. but when you mop floors and do 5 loads of laundry a day just imagine the expense.

    .its not useful in all areas on all fabrics sure. Thats why we use Parvo Clear as our main disinfectant for surfaces and cages.
    I n the large concrete dog runs I use bleach with a good hose out...but do not put animals directly into the run or use it while a animal is in it.

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    Re: Bleach does NOT kill Parvo!

    There is a new product called Nixall that is 200 times stronger than bleach, non-toxic, 100% eco-friendly and kills Parvo. This is what I would recommend instead of using bleach or a diluted bleach solution.

  21. #20
    Senior Member vet@veterinaryinsight.com's Avatar
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    Re: Bleach does NOT kill Parvo!

    Briteday and Inkypaws are correct. Bleach, properly diluted is a very effective way to kill Parvo virus, with certain caveats:
    1) Parvo virus is what is called an "unenveloped virus." The envelope is what makes certain viruses so difficult to kill with normal disinfectants. As an unenveloped virus, Parvo is actually rather easy to kill. Ettinger's Texbook of Veterinary Internal Medicine makes the following comment: "Parvovirus is inactivated by bleach solutions (1 part bleach to 29 parts water)..."
    2) However...bleach has no detergent properties. This leads to a problem where in the disinfectant is "overwhelmed by organic materials." In other words, in the face of poop (blood, protein, mucous, etc.), the bleach quickly stops working. There is an easy solution to this, however: Mix a small amount of some other detergent (basically a soap) into your bleach water, or clean the surface in question with a detergent before applying the bleach.
    3) As mentioned previously, it is exceedingly difficult to effectively disinfect any porous surface with bleach, or any other disinfectant. Bleach also has the added disadvantage of potentially damaging carpet, couches, clothing, etc.

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