Dachsund Hacking Cough Problem
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Thread: Dachsund Hacking Cough Problem

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    Dachsund Hacking Cough Problem

    I Have A 3 Month Old Mini Dachsund Puppy Who Has A Hacking Cough. I Took Her To The Vet And They Did Some X-rays And Said They Thought It Was An Upper Respitory Problem. She Was On Antibiotics For About 10 Days. That Seemed To Help For A While,then She Started Doing It Again. The Vet Gave Her A Steroid Shot And That Helped For About A Week, And Now The Hacking And Coughing Is Worse Than Ever. Does Anyone Have Any Ideas? Thanks Any Ideas Would Be Appreciated.

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    Re: Dachsund Hacking Cough Problem

    Quote Originally Posted by sandyc View Post
    I Have A 3 Month Old Mini Dachsund Puppy Who Has A Hacking Cough. I Took Her To The Vet And They Did Some X-rays And Said They Thought It Was An Upper Respitory Problem. She Was On Antibiotics For About 10 Days. That Seemed To Help For A While,then She Started Doing It Again. The Vet Gave Her A Steroid Shot And That Helped For About A Week, And Now The Hacking And Coughing Is Worse Than Ever. Does Anyone Have Any Ideas? Thanks Any Ideas Would Be Appreciated.
    if you aren't getting satisfaction from your vet and the cough continues it is time to go and get a second opinion.... in a small breed and such a young dog I would be reticent to give any advice other than to see a vet.....
    coughs can become quiet serious in young puppies and are nothing to mess around with....

    if your vet can't figure it out then you need to find a vet that can
    s

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    Re: Dachsund Hacking Cough Problem

    Kennel cough can take weeks to resolve, and its pretty common in young dogs, especially if they've been around other dogs recently. I wouldn't accept another steroid shot however, unless your vet can PROVE there isn't any infection going on.

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    Re: Dachsund Hacking Cough Problem

    Quote Originally Posted by Misskiwi67 View Post
    Kennel cough can take weeks to resolve, and its pretty common in young dogs, especially if they've been around other dogs recently. I wouldn't accept another steroid shot however, unless your vet can PROVE there isn't any infection going on.

    you are diagnosing now?????
    interesting......

    then you AS A STUDENT most certainly realize that Kennel cough can easily turn into pneumonia in a young puppy especially a toy breed......

    so instead of diagnosing don't you think that sending her back to her vet would be wise.......????? instead of saying well it could take weeks to resolve and implying that she should just wait it out...???

    I would follow the advise of your LICENSED vet rather than that of a student over the internet who has not seen, examined or listened to the lungs of your pup....

    as stated before.... just as with people if you do not get satisfaction as to solving the cough problem it might be time to find a second opinion.

    s
    Last edited by Shalva; 06-21-2007 at 11:14 PM.

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    Senior Member luv4gsds's Avatar
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    Re: Dachsund Hacking Cough Problem

    I have some question to ask.

    1) How long has your Dachshund been coughing?
    2) Have you had your Dachshund groomed here recently?
    3) Is the cough harsh and dry or is it moist and productive?
    4) Is your Dachshund having trouble breathing?
    5) Does your Dachshund have a runny nose and sneezing?
    6) Does your Dachshund cough most when it is up and active or when it is lying down?

    It could be a number of things that can cause this starting with the heart, lungs, infection and so on. I would seek out another vet.

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    Re: Dachsund Hacking Cough Problem

    she has had the cough since i got her from the breeder. I have had her for about three weeks. it is a dry hacking cough,then its like she is trying to throw up but nothing comes out. she is very active,and eats and drinks well and is a great little puppy. i had called the breeder and she told me that its mother does this sometimes and that wire-haired doxies can get hairballs???? anyone ever heard of that? i called the vet this morning and am taking her in this afternoon. thanks for all the responses.

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    Re: Dachsund Hacking Cough Problem

    I have not heard of that but I imagine it is possible.
    I love wire haired doxies and would love to see some pictures of her when you can.
    good luck at the vet
    s

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    Re: Dachsund Hacking Cough Problem

    Dogs don't get hairballs??? what? I have a longhaired dachshund and he has never once gotten a "hairball".

    Sounds to me like the breeder is trying to avoid her responsibility, IMO. Either the pup came from the breeder sick with kennel cough or some other upper resp. infection or the mom has a collapsing trachea which she passed down to her pups.

    You need to be dilligent about getting the cough fixed. As Shalva said URI in puppys are not something to mess with, infact any sickness in a young pup shouldn't be treated lightly. If it is kennel cough then you need to continue with the vet recomended meds and have the vet re-check until it's gone. You may also want to disscus the posibility of it being a collapsing trachea. It's very common in dachshunds and something you need to be aware of if that is what he has.

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    Re: Dachsund Hacking Cough Problem

    My first pup had kennel cough and she had to be treated several times for it--the vet would give me meds (she had a shot too) and would say, "if it is not gone in 5 days (or whatever the time frame was), I want you back in". You need to go back in to that vet for a recheck or to another vet who is more diligent about following up on his furry patients.

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    Re: Dachsund Hacking Cough Problem

    i took ollie(my daschund ) back to the vet this afternoon. the vet checked her again and said her lungs sounded good. she had one of her coughing attacks while we were there and the vet said it sound like something stuck in her nasal cavity or her soft palate,so she wanted to sedate her and check to see if she could find anything in there.(grass seed or blade of grass). well needless to say she found nothing.... i have to pick her up in the morning and she wants to start her on another round of antibiotics if this doesn't help then i will be referred to the vet hospital at university of tn@knoxville. (the antibiotics helped before until she was thru taking them). Any thoughts or suggestions??? thanks

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    Re: Dachsund Hacking Cough Problem

    Quote Originally Posted by sandyc View Post
    i took ollie(my daschund ) back to the vet this afternoon. the vet checked her again and said her lungs sounded good. she had one of her coughing attacks while we were there and the vet said it sound like something stuck in her nasal cavity or her soft palate,so she wanted to sedate her and check to see if she could find anything in there.(grass seed or blade of grass). well needless to say she found nothing.... i have to pick her up in the morning and she wants to start her on another round of antibiotics if this doesn't help then i will be referred to the vet hospital at university of tn@knoxville. (the antibiotics helped before until she was thru taking them). Any thoughts or suggestions??? thanks
    I think that your best bet is to follow your vets advice and follow through with the referral if she decides to do that..... small dogs and puppies can have severe repercussions from coughs that might be otherwise harmless
    I am glad you opted to take her to the vet..... hopefully they can figure out what is going on.
    good luck
    Steph

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    Re: Dachsund Hacking Cough Problem

    Quote Originally Posted by sandyc View Post
    this doesn't help then i will be referred to the vet hospital at university of tn@knoxville. (the antibiotics helped before until she was thru taking them).
    You live in the knoxville area or they just sending you down here?

    I live in west Knox and go to University of Tennessee.

    I have a 6 month shih tzu and he has coughed once or twice kind of like a dry hack, but once was from where he ate a piece of the fuzz off a tennis ball he was playing with , he coughed for good 5-10 mins with that and then the next time I couldn't figure out why he was coughing but as far as your situation I wouldn't really know especially since your puppy has done it ever since you got her from the breeder.. Only thing I could think of is that she got something from the mom or being around other dogs as a young one..

    Did you go to the house when you bought your pup and see the parents, living conditions, etc or did they meet you when somewhere?

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    Re: Dachsund Hacking Cough Problem

    Quote Originally Posted by Shalva View Post
    you are diagnosing now?????
    interesting......

    then you AS A STUDENT most certainly realize that Kennel cough can easily turn into pneumonia in a young puppy especially a toy breed......

    so instead of diagnosing don't you think that sending her back to her vet would be wise.......????? instead of saying well it could take weeks to resolve and implying that she should just wait it out...???

    I would follow the advise of your LICENSED vet rather than that of a student over the internet who has not seen, examined or listened to the lungs of your pup....
    Sensitive are we? If the vet is administering steroids, its already been diagnosed as kennel cough and NOT pneumonia, and I had absolutely nothing to do with it.

    A dog with kennel cough IS going to cough until the mucosa has healed, and the bordatella basically destroys the entire mucosal lining of the bronchioles. Any treatments given to suppresss the cough will also suppress the natural clearance mechanisms. You have to balance the need to maximize the immune system with the need for the dog to have comfort. I personally prefer to tell owners that your dog is going to be coughing for several weeks instead of telling them to find another vet to shoot the dog full of drugs to keep it comfortable. Thats just my uneducated, not a veterinarians opinion however.

    Oh, and just to cover my butt since I'm giving too much advice... if your dog has anorexia, fever, lethargy, starts breathing from its abdomen, has ocular or nasal discharge, or any other change in clinical signs, you should see a vet immediately as the disease has changed. If the coughing doesn't go away in a couple weeks, you should discuss radiographs with your veterinarian as your dog may have a congenital problem such as hypoplastic trachea or collapsing trachea.

    The best way to monitor your dogs ability to breathe is to monitor their resting respiratory rate. Count how many times your dog breathes per minute while resting and sleeping. If the respiratory rate increases significantly (unless dreaming) or if it is above 60, you should call your veterinarian immediately.

    Feel better now Shalva?

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    Re: Dachsund Hacking Cough Problem

    Here is an excellent article on Kennel cough if you want more information. Feline info, bronchodilators and nebulization edited out due to space restrictions...

    Bordetella bronchiseptica in Dogs and Cats
    ACVIM 2003
    Richard B. Ford, DVM, MS, DACVIM
    Raleigh, NC

    THE NATURE OF THE BEAST
    Closely related to Bordetella pertussis, the cause of "whooping cough" in humans, Bordetella bronchiseptica is a gram negative, aerobic coccobacillus particularly well adapted to colonize the ciliated respiratory epithelium of dogs and cats. Today, this organism is regarded as the principle etiologic agent of canine infectious tracheobronchitis (ITB). In the clinical setting, however, B. bronchiseptica infection should not be regarded as synonymous with ITB. Dogs infected with canine parainfluenza virus (CPiV) or canine adenovirus-2 (CAV-2) are expected to experience more severe respiratory disease when co-infected with B. bronchiseptica than with any these agents alone. Canine bordetellosis, i.e., B. bronchiseptica infection in the absence of either CPiV or CAV-2, is known to occur and can be associated with acute, fatal pneumonia in young dogs. B. bronchiseptica is transmitted through aerosolization of respiratory secretions. Bacteria can also be transmitted directly by contaminated dishware, human hands, and other fomites. Because B. bronchiseptica possesses several intrinsic mechanisms for evading host defenses, it is recognized for its role as a significant complicating factor in dogs with multiple-agent respiratory infections. The fact that outbreaks of canine ITB are common, despite widespread use of topical and parenteral vaccines in dogs for over 20 years, highlights the fact that current vaccines are not highly effective in preventing infection.

    PATHOGENESIS OF INFECTION
    Most of what is known about the pathogenesis of B. bronchiseptica is based on information derived from studies in dogs. In addition to dogs, infections have been documented in cats, pigs, various laboratory species, and humans. B. bronchiseptica rarely infects tissues outside the respiratory tract, a fact that supports the ease of transmissibility among dogs, particularly when housed in close quarters. Contributing to the ability of B. bronchiseptica to colonize respiratory epithelium is the fact that the bacterium possesses both fimbrial and non-fimbrial adhesins that facilitate the attachment to host cells. Two non-fimbrial adhesins, filamentous hemagglutinin (FHA) and pertactin (Prn), are essential for the attachment of B. bronchiseptica to respiratory epithelial cells. Understanding the role of such proteins in the pathogenesis of B. bronchiseptica infection has been fundamental in investigations that may lead to the first acellular whooping cough vaccine. It is not unreasonable that such research may ultimately lead to improved vaccines for dogs and cats. Fimbriae, hair-like appendages extending from the cell membrane of B. bronchiseptica, recognize specific receptors within the respiratory tract. This allows B. bronchiseptica to colonize specific tissues where it then releases various exotoxins (such as adenylate cyclase-hemolysin and dermonecrotic toxin) and endotoxins that impair function of the respiratory epithelium (ciliastasis) and compromise the ability of the infected host to eliminate the infection. These potent toxins not only disrupt the protective action of the mucociliary apparatus, but also are believed to compromise phagocytosis and suppress both cellular and humoral immune responses. Additionally, B. bronchiseptica is regarded as an extracellular pathogen that has the unique ability to invade host cells. Once contained within the intracellular environment, bacteria are able to avoid immunologic defense mechanisms and establish a persistent infection (months) or carrier state.

    CLINICAL PRESENTATION
    Clinical signs of canine infectious tracheobronchitis (ITB) include paroxysmal coughing episodes, frequently associated with retching and expectoration, in an otherwise healthy, active dog. Swelling of the vocal folds, associated with laryngitis, can result in a loud, high-pitched cough often described as a "goose honk" or "seal honk." Expectoration of mucus following an episode of retching or hacking behavior may be misinterpreted by the owner as vomiting. Anorexia, fever, and lethargy may be observed among infected dogs during an outbreak. The onset of clinical signs typically ranges from 3 to 10 days following exposure. In most clinical cases, the onset of clinical signs can be associated with recent exposure to other dogs or general anesthesia and endotracheal intubation. The ability to elicit a cough on manipulation of the trachea is an inconsistent clinical finding that should not be used exclusively to rule canine ITB in or out.

    A second, more severe respiratory syndrome has been observed in dogs residing within kennel environments during an outbreak of ITB. Although cough may be present, the predominant clinical sign is associated with mucoid to mucopurulent nasal and ocular discharge. Pneumonia is likely to be a complicating factor and, in some cases, may become life threatening, particularly in puppies. In these cases, B. bronchiseptica has been isolated from the pharynx and trachea as a pure culture. Affected dogs are characteristically febrile, lethargic, anorexic, and may show some degree of respiratory distress or even dyspnea. Such cases are difficult to distinguish from those with bacterial pneumonia as well as non-bacterial causes of pneumonia. We have observed outbreaks to occur at any time of the year and may affect more than 50 percent of the dogs in a densely populated environment. Puppies are more severely affected and are at significant risk of dying if not treated.

    DIAGNOSIS
    A clinical diagnosis of infectious tracheobronchitis is based on historical or physical examination findings that meet clinical criteria described above. In addition, a history of exposure to other dogs (whether or not they have signs of coughing) is helpful in establishing the diagnosis. A favorable and rapid response to empiric antibacterial and antitussive treatment supports the diagnosis of uncomplicated ITB. Routine thoracic radiography, hematology, and biochemistry profiles are neither diagnostic nor prognostic in uncomplicated cases. An inflammatory leukogram with significant leukocytosis or left shift may develop in dogs with a complicated infection associated with pneumonia. It should be noted that because of the large number of indigenous microflora in the canine respiratory tract, bacterial isolates from the nasal and oral cavities will not distinguish a primary infection from a secondary or opportunistic infection. In dogs with uncomplicated ITB, thoracic radiographs are typically unremarkable. Dogs with respiratory complications associated with ITB may have radiographic signs of pulmonary hyperinflation, interstitial pneumonia, and segmental atelectasis.

    TREATMENT RECOMMENDATIONS
    Treatment of B. bronchiseptica is centered around oral administration of an appropriately sensitive antimicrobial. However, it may be in the patient's best interest to administer cough suppressants in the form of anti-inflammatory and/or antitussive drugs, particularly on a short-term basis.

    Antimicrobials

    Most cases of uncomplicated ITB can be regarded as self-limiting and do not necessarily require antimicrobial therapy. However, conventional practice standards include empiric, short-term administration of an antimicrobial to prevent opportunistic infections. Whether or not dogs with clinical signs of ITB are at significant risk of developing bacterial pneumonia has not been definitively established. On the other hand, evidence of a mucoid to mucopurulent nasal and/or ocular discharge justifies administration of an antimicrobial. Doxycycline, administered orally at 5.0 to 10.0 mg/kg, once daily, for a minimum of 2 weeks is the first choice of antibiotic due to its efficacy against B. bronchiseptica. However, the ability of B. bronchiseptica to persist in the respiratory tract of infected dogs for as long as 3 months justifies a treatment duration of up to 30 days, particularly when attempting to manage simultaneous infections in multiple dogs living in the same environment.

    Glucocorticoids

    Short-term administration of glucocorticosteroids, administered concurrently with an antimicrobial, is safe and effective in attenuating severe cough in dogs having an uncomplicated infection. Prednisolone can be administered at anti-inflammatory doses, 0.25-0.5 mg/kg, orally, once or twice daily, for up to 5 days as needed to control cough. Since some of the antimicrobials recommended in the treatment of canine ITB are bacteriostatic, concurrent use of glucocorticoids should not be extended beyond 5 days. It is recommended that antimicrobial therapy be continued for at least 5 to 7 days beyond the day that the corticosteroid is discontinued.

    Antitussives

    Antitussives alone and in combination with bronchodilators, have been recommended in the treatment of canine ITB. Either hydrocodone or butorphanol are recommended antitussives. In cases of ITB that are complicated by bacterial pneumonia, administration of narcotic antitussives is not recommended.

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    Re: Dachsund Hacking Cough Problem

    Quote Originally Posted by Misskiwi67 View Post
    Sensitive are we? If the vet is administering steroids, its already been diagnosed as kennel cough and NOT pneumonia, and I had absolutely nothing to do with it.



    Feel better now Shalva?
    No because as long as you continue to give advice OVER THE INTERNET for things that are serious and potentially life threatening without seeing the dog, examining the dog, talking to the person, and practicing medicine without a license .... I am going to make sure that there is someone to counter that with a good old fashioned take your dog to the vet.

    Plus even if you were a licensed vet and not a student the fact is that you can't diagnose a dog whom you have never seen or listened to OVER THE INTERNET..... and here you are telling a person to not allow the vet .... the person who has seen and heard the dog ..... to do what they think they should....!!!! to me that is downright dangerous.....

    Why you would want to WAIT for a young puppy of a toy breed to get lethargic and anorexic and and and .... before sending them back to the vet is beyond me.....

    this could indeed by kennel cough.... that might need to run its course.... it could also be something caught in the throat of the dog.... like the dog at the ER clinic when I was there who had a needle through its tongue that nobody could see with just a regular visual examination.... the people had been waiting it out.... just a cough... no problem.....

    its dangerous..... and I am very surprised that as a student you can't recognize the limitations of this medium

    S

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    Senior Member borzoimom's Avatar
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    Re: Dachsund Hacking Cough Problem

    Misskiwi- Its HIGHLY dangerious to diagnose over the internet... You cant examine the dog and to do so is dangerious.. !

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    Re: Dachsund Hacking Cough Problem

    I have never heard of dogs getting hair balls. I own two mini Dachshunds both smooth coats. It take KC about three weeks to a month to run its course. Some dogs get relieve from KC with in two weeks with treatment.

    Did the vet give any cough suppressants?
    Last edited by luv4gsds; 06-23-2007 at 10:36 AM.

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    Re: Dachsund Hacking Cough Problem

    the vet checked ollie to see if there might be anything stuck in her nasal passages and soft pallet,(they found nothing )but they kept her overnight because she had a late afternoon appointment. I picked her up this morning and they have put her on two different drugs(CLAvamox,which is an antibiotic and predisone). since bringing her home she hasn't had an attack,which is much better than yesterday when she was having them every few minutes. she eats well and is gaining weight and is playful like a normal puppy should be,except for the cough. if this round of treatment doesn't work or if she were to get worse i will DEFINITELY be taking her to knoxville to UT. just wanted to update everyone and thank you all for your advice and info.

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    Re: Dachsund Hacking Cough Problem

    Quote Originally Posted by luv4gsds View Post
    I have never heard of dogs getting hair balls. I own two mini Dachshunds both smooth coats. It take KC about three weeks to a month to run its cours. Some dogs get relieve from KC with in two weeks with treatment.

    Did the vet give any cough suppressants?
    I have heard of dogs getting hairballs and wonder if it is something about the wire coat.....

    the prednisone is probably to try and calm down irritated passages and get things to relax a bit... at this point he could have just irritated his system so much that you need to break that cycle.

    good luck with your pup and don't forget to post some pictures of him....
    nothin cuter than a wirehaired dachshund.....

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    Re: Dachsund Hacking Cough Problem

    the vet didn't give me a cough suppressent. i will try to post some picts later today. she is a real cutie!!!!!!!!

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