Dog Grooming and behavior
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Thread: Dog Grooming and behavior

  1. #1
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    Cool Dog Grooming and behavior

    I have two shi-poo puppies (1.5) years old and I recently took them to be groomed. One of the puppies had to have his hair cut very short, almost shaved, due to matting he got from his harness and my having difficulty combing him. Since his trip to the goomers his behavior has changed significantly. He seems to cower, does not want to go out for a walk and seems overall sad. It has been three days since his grooming and his behavior has not improved. He used to he a happy-go-lucky dog and now he just seems sad and periodically licks his back side. However, he does not appear to have any cuts on him or any redness. He is eating and drinking well, but seems sad and less playful then usual. Is is possible that he just needs time to get used to his new shorter haircut or was he somehow really traumatized at the groomers? I am worried because I have read so much stuff on the net about dogs getting abused by groomers.

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  3. #2
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    Re: Dog Grooming and behavior

    well I wouldn't Totally rule out the dog being abused because you just never know. BUT! being a groomer myself... I know that some dogs just take being groomed differently. He may just have to get used to the fact that he has no hair now. Given the fact that its cooler now than it was, he probably just feels funny with all of his hair gone. Sometimes it takes them a few grooms before they realize that nothing was hurting them and that they are okay. I would just watch him a while and see how he does. I wouldn't make his behavior from his first shavedown shy me away from doing it again though. like I said previously, some dogs take a few trips to the groomer before they get used to it. Don't worry he will back to himself before you know it

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    Senior Member poodleholic's Avatar
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    Re: Dog Grooming and behavior

    A lot of the Poodles I've fostered displayed similar behavior after being groomed. I know they weren't abused, because I was there and assisted. Removing hair can affect a change in behavior, as can the change of environment, strange people and other dogs, and also, some aren't used to being groomed. Each dog is an individual, and react differently. I've watched Poodles who, in desperate need of being groomed, appeared withdrawn and wary, yet became happy little, vivacious darlings after a groom!

    A few weeks ago, I got a poor little mini Poodle who was matted to felt. The groomer we use is excellent, but this little poodle girl was going to end up bald, and with no topknot because the groomer wouldn't consider wet shaving her, and would have to use a #10F blade all over. So, I soaked her in warm water, lathering her up with shampoo, rinsed her, and then more shampoo and LOTS of EQyss Mega-Tek conditioner, and wraped her in a towel for about 30 min. or so. Rinsed her, lathered her up with more Mega-Tek, then blotted her, and shaved her down wet, with a #4F blade, leaving the topknot to scissor. Her tail was hopelessly matted, so couldn't save that, but it doesn't look bad at all. Then rinsed her again, and used the HV, and went over a few spots again. Rachel (groomer) was floored by all the hair left on this little poodle girl, whom I've named MeMe, because she's such a happy little thing, bouncing all over the place (and into your lap), and seeming to say look at me, look at me! My two (Standards) put up with her pushing them out've the way so she can have my attention! LOL

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    Senior Member Love's_Sophie's Avatar
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    Re: Dog Grooming and behavior

    I would say, next time, definitely don't wait so long to get the dogs groomed; if they are matted so bad that the only option is shaving, you have waited too long!

    Even if the groomer didn't do anything wrong, that dog is probably a bit tender from the matts having been pulling at his skin...shaving, even if you can't see anything, can aggravate the problem.

    Now, this is not to say the groomer wasn't rough with the dog either; so the next time I would probably try a different groomer and see what happens...if the same thing happens, it could be your dog just doesn't like the process of getting 'naked'!!!

    Oh and just a 'quick' not on wet shaving, while it is seemingly easier on the clippers and the dog, you are really doing a number on your blades. You also wind up having to change your drivers sooner, because the blades have to work harder, as does the clipper, to get through a wet coat.

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    Member justagirl21's Avatar
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    Exclamation Re: Dog Grooming and behavior

    Please don't take this personally Poodleholic but...
    You shaved her down WET!
    I highly agree with Love's_Sophie that clipping a dog wet is one of the worst things you can do to your blades short term and your clippers long term. I already do a grooming no-no and sometimes clip matted dogs, only because I don't want to get the dog wet as it worsens the matt and the dog will take two centuries to dry because of the clumped hair! Clipping matted/dirty dogs already wears my blades down and clipping a wet dog would be murder to your blades. If this dog came to me I would've (as heartbreaking as it is) told the owner it has to come off reeeal short and to start again. Teaching the owner good grooming practices and showing them what tools to use will ensure that this dog (hopefully) can be left long for future grooms.

    Sometimes you need to consider the welfare of the dog (and your clippers, as they're not cheap!) before the overall 'look' of the dog. Sometimes you have to do, what you have to do, and your going to make some dogs look silly along the way

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    Re: Dog Grooming and behavior

    i strongly urge you guys to go to petgroomerforums.com and do a search on wet shaving and find out that it is actually a really good technique, when done right.

    i also urge the poster to a- not ever leave a harness on a dog long enough for it to cause any sort of matting (this includes collars and clothes as well), and b- to brush your dog daily. i am 90% sure that yoru dog is acting this way b/c he had one hell of a time at the groomers. it doesnt sound like you have done any sort of desensitising to grooming, which means he probably fought the groomer and made the entire process pretty hard for him, not to mention your groomer. and being shaved is very hard on most dogs. not only does it take longer, but it weird to be able to fell your own skin after being matted. i will also urge you not to coddle your dog for acting so sad after grooming, b/c he will learn to do it everytime he is groomed just so he can get attention. other than that, learn how to brush your dog, whether he likes it or not.

  8. #7
    Senior Member xoxluvablexox's Avatar
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    Re: Dog Grooming and behavior

    When my dog gets groomed his personality almost changes. I have a poodle and after grooming he always seems to act more prissy. Like he's a king and deserves the world. He even walks differently, it's goes from being a normal dog walk to being something like a show dog walk. Maybe it's just my imagination but it's almost like he knows he looks better haha.
    So maybe it might just be that your dog is unconfortable with the new feeling of having no fur and needs to get used to it. Other then that it's most likely because he's never been groomed before and it was a new and fightening experience.
    "Modesty is a vastly overrated virtue."
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    Senior Member poodleholic's Avatar
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    Re: Dog Grooming and behavior

    Not to worry; I won't take it personally! LOL The thing is, I know what I'm talking about, because I've done it, and learned about this technique from professional groomers who have perfected the method.

    I understand where you're coming from, but, you're mistaken. Shaving wet does not ruin the blade or the clipper at all, and many professional groomers have discovered this technique, and are amazed by how it saves their blades from getting dull, and gives them many extra months between sharpening. I oil the blades before I start, and use blade wash after, and the HV dryer to blow out the wet hair and dry before putting it away. I have an Andis UltraEdge 2 speed, and also a cordless Wahl Moser trimmer.

    What dulls blades is clipping a dirty coat. It's easier to get out matts in the bath, and cuts down a lot of time when you've got a badly matted dog. My dogs (Standard Poodles) aren't matted, but I will often wet shave my male's body, because he's got such a dense coat (and I have arthritic and painful thumb joints). The clipper goes through like a hot knife in butter. Try it, you'll like it! LOL





    Quote Originally Posted by justagirl21 View Post
    Please don't take this personally Poodleholic but...
    You shaved her down WET!
    I highly agree with Love's_Sophie that clipping a dog wet is one of the worst things you can do to your blades short term and your clippers long term. I already do a grooming no-no and sometimes clip matted dogs, only because I don't want to get the dog wet as it worsens the matt and the dog will take two centuries to dry because of the clumped hair! Clipping matted/dirty dogs already wears my blades down and clipping a wet dog would be murder to your blades. If this dog came to me I would've (as heartbreaking as it is) told the owner it has to come off reeeal short and to start again. Teaching the owner good grooming practices and showing them what tools to use will ensure that this dog (hopefully) can be left long for future grooms.

    Sometimes you need to consider the welfare of the dog (and your clippers, as they're not cheap!) before the overall 'look' of the dog. Sometimes you have to do, what you have to do, and your going to make some dogs look silly along the way
    Oh and just a 'quick' not on wet shaving, while it is seemingly easier on the clippers and the dog, you are really doing a number on your blades. You also wind up having to change your drivers sooner, because the blades have to work harder, as does the clipper, to get through a wet coat.
    Not true. A DAMP coat, yes. But, not a wet coat slippery with conditioner.
    Last edited by poodleholic; 01-28-2008 at 07:00 AM. Reason: Automerged Doublepost

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    Re: Dog Grooming and behavior

    I have a Chihuahua x Bolognese and she is 18 months old. We took her to the groomer 8 days ago and her behaviour has totally done a 360. We groomed her last year (about 3 times during the summer) with no problems but with the usual rubbing on everything from the lack of hair (she is normally VERY fluffy) and not being used to no hair.

    Well this time the groomer had a little accident with her. The groomer was shaving her near her ear and looked away for a second and my dogs ear got in the way and the groomer nicked her ear ( I say nick but it's a small chunk). The groomer says there was a little blood and my dog (RAGE) didn't cry, whimpper or anything. Well it's been 8 days now and she is not the same dog. She cuddles ALOT more, hardly plays and she always wants to be with me. She is eating and drinking the same, no change in that. Rage has always been mommies girl as I have bottled fed her since she was 3 weeks old, but this new behaviour is NOT her. Before this she would always play with my Pug x Schnauzer and her daddy the Chihuahua, and they would play rough together. Now she has to be with me and or by my side if she's not on my lap.
    I trust my groomer as we have been going there for 2 years now.
    Could this "loosing a chunk of her ear" really traumatized her? I'm worried about my girl! She kinda lets me touch her ear but only to a point...

    Please help ease my worried mind....

  11. #10
    Senior Member Graco22's Avatar
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    Re: Dog Grooming and behavior

    Quote Originally Posted by JinaC View Post
    I have a Chihuahua x Bolognese and she is 18 months old. We took her to the groomer 8 days ago and her behaviour has totally done a 360. We groomed her last year (about 3 times during the summer) with no problems but with the usual rubbing on everything from the lack of hair (she is normally VERY fluffy) and not being used to no hair.

    Well this time the groomer had a little accident with her. The groomer was shaving her near her ear and looked away for a second and my dogs ear got in the way and the groomer nicked her ear ( I say nick but it's a small chunk). The groomer says there was a little blood and my dog (RAGE) didn't cry, whimpper or anything. Well it's been 8 days now and she is not the same dog. She cuddles ALOT more, hardly plays and she always wants to be with me. She is eating and drinking the same, no change in that. Rage has always been mommies girl as I have bottled fed her since she was 3 weeks old, but this new behaviour is NOT her. Before this she would always play with my Pug x Schnauzer and her daddy the Chihuahua, and they would play rough together. Now she has to be with me and or by my side if she's not on my lap.
    I trust my groomer as we have been going there for 2 years now.
    Could this "loosing a chunk of her ear" really traumatized her? I'm worried about my girl! She kinda lets me touch her ear but only to a point...

    Please help ease my worried mind....
    No, your dog was not traumatized by the incident, any more than she would have been had the vet removed a mole etc. It is you who was "traumatized" and you probably dont realize that you are now treating her differently, making her feel insecure and as if there is something to worry about. When you "forget" about the incident, and act normal, she too will. :-)

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    Re: Dog Grooming and behavior

    Quote Originally Posted by Graco22 View Post
    No, your dog was not traumatized by the incident, any more than she would have been had the vet removed a mole etc. It is you who was "traumatized" and you probably dont realize that you are now treating her differently, making her feel insecure and as if there is something to worry about. When you "forget" about the incident, and act normal, she too will. :-)
    I am not treating her differently. I am treating her exactly the same way as I have been for the last 18 months, my husband and neighbours have even noticed the change in her. If she is not within 2 feet of me she cries, for the last 2-3 weeks I have been busy in the gardens so they are ALL with me and I treat them ALL the same. So I dont know, maybe something else happened...

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    Junior Member Brieana's Avatar
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    Re: Dog Grooming and behavior

    I used to bathe dogs at Petsmart and once I had a collie who had never been groomed since her adoption. She was 5-7 years old. I didn't check her in, so I didn't have a chance to ask about health issues. Turned out she was blind in one eye, and I didn't know. I treated her as a normal dog, but was slow and gentle because she seemed very frightened. I even called the owner to say the grooming would take a little longer than usual because I was taking it really slow with her.
    I didn't realize she was partially blind until she bumped into some cage dryer hoses as I was walking her out to check out. As I was waiting for her owner to pay, she laid down next to me and didn't respond to her owner calling her name.
    The owner asked me if she was sedated and I said no, we don't even have access to sedatives. They left and the owner even called me asking again what I had given her. I promised her I didn't and I was very careful with her.
    That was the last I heard of it. But even four years later, I still wonder what it was. Maybe she had a heart condition and nobody knew? Maybe it was PTSD from an experience she had before being adopted by her current owner? Maybe bumping into that hose made her lose what little confidence she had in me?
    What I'm saying is I did everything I could to keep her comfortable and the situation still seemed to traumatize her. Some dogs just shouldn't be sent to a groomer. It's too loud and unfamiliar.

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